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How Health Care AI Systems Are Changing Care Delivery - NEJM Catalyst

#artificialintelligence

A nurse avatar named "Molly" who regularly talks with patients about their symptoms and medical needs. Voice-recognition software that helps physicians document clinical encounters. A prescription drug-monitoring platform that can detect patients' opioid misuse. Systems that analyze millions of medical images to help physicians diagnose and predict diseases. Robots that extend the reach of surgeons.


When to Intervene: Detecting Abnormal Mood using Everyday Smartphone Conversations

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Bipolar disorder (BPD) is a chronic mental illness characterized by extreme mood and energy changes from mania to depression. These changes drive behaviors that often lead to devastating personal or social consequences. BPD is managed clinically with regular interactions with care providers, who assess mood, energy levels, and the form and content of speech. Recent work has proposed smartphones for monitoring mood using speech. However, these works do not predict when to intervene. Predicting when to intervene is challenging because there is not a single measure that is relevant for every person: different individuals may have different levels of symptom severity considered typical. Additionally, this typical mood, or baseline, may change over time, making a single symptom threshold insufficient. This work presents an innovative approach that expands clinical mood monitoring to predict when interventions are necessary using an anomaly detection framework, which we call Temporal Normalization. We first validate the model using a dataset annotated for clinical interventions and then incorporate this method in a deep learning framework to predict mood anomalies from natural, unstructured, telephone speech data. The combination of these approaches provides a framework to enable real-world speech-focused mood monitoring.


A 20-Year Community Roadmap for Artificial Intelligence Research in the US

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Decades of research in artificial intelligence (AI) have produced formidable technologies that are providing immense benefit to industry, government, and society. AI systems can now translate across multiple languages, identify objects in images and video, streamline manufacturing processes, and control cars. The deployment of AI systems has not only created a trillion-dollar industry that is projected to quadruple in three years, but has also exposed the need to make AI systems fair, explainable, trustworthy, and secure. Future AI systems will rightfully be expected to reason effectively about the world in which they (and people) operate, handling complex tasks and responsibilities effectively and ethically, engaging in meaningful communication, and improving their awareness through experience. Achieving the full potential of AI technologies poses research challenges that require a radical transformation of the AI research enterprise, facilitated by significant and sustained investment. These are the major recommendations of a recent community effort coordinated by the Computing Community Consortium and the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence to formulate a Roadmap for AI research and development over the next two decades.


Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare

#artificialintelligence

The world is evolving and so is technology. Over time, we've witnessed how the world has become smaller with the growth of the Internet. Exploring and searching for something is now just a click away and healthcare technology has rapidly evolved. Today, with the help of Artificial Intelligence (AI), diagnosing and then treatment of certain diseases in patients has become extremely dynamic. Machine Learning and Natural Language Processing (NLP) and Deep learning are making healthcare far more efficient by generating real-time clinical insights at all points of care to improve patient outcomes, which is just a start.


Does Your Doctor Need a Voice Assistant?

WIRED

"Siri, where is the nearest Starbucks?" "Suki, let's get Mr. Jones a two-week run of clarithromycin and schedule him back here for a follow-up in two weeks." Doesn't sound that crazy, does it? For years, voice assistants have been changing the way people shop, get around, and manage their home entertainment systems. Now they're starting to show up someplace even a little more personal: the doctor's office.