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Elon Musk's Neuralink rival Synchron begins human trials of brain implant

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Elon Musk's Neuralink rival Synchron has begun human trials of its brain implant that lets the wearer control a computer using thought alone. The firm's Stentrode brain implant, about the size of a paperclip, will be implanted in six patients in New York and Pittsburgh who have severe paralysis. Stentrode will let patients control digital devices just by thinking and give them back the ability to perform daily tasks, including texting, emailing and shopping online. Although the implant has already been implanted and tested in Australian patients, the new clinical trial marks the first time it will be tested in the US. If successful, the Stentrode brain implant could be sold as a commercial product aimed at paralysis patients to regain their independence and quality of life.


Elon Musk's brain chip company Neuralink to begin human trials!

#artificialintelligence

Elon Musk-run brain-machine interface company Neuralink is preparing to launch clinical trials that will implant brain chips in humans. Elon Musk's brain-interface technology company Neuralink may start implanting microchips in human beings from 2022. Neuralink is preparing to launch clinical trials that will implant brain chips in humans. Cofounded by Elon Musk in 2016, Neuralink is working on a chip that would be implanted in our brains to record and stimulate brain activity. This chip is being created for medical applications such as treating serious spinal cord injuries and neurological disorders.


Elon Musk's brain chip startup prepares for first ever human trials

The Independent - Tech

Elon Musk appears close to beginning the first ever human trials of his brain-computer interface technology. A new job posting for a'Clinical Trial Director' at Neuralink reveals that the neurotech startup is preparing to take its brain chip research to the next stage. Neuralink has already conducted trials on pigs and monkeys, including a successful experiment involving a nine-year-old macaque capable of playing video games using only its mind. The firm eventually hopes to use the technology to allow "human-AI symbiosis". Early human trials, which Mr Musk said last month will take place in 2022, will likely involve people with paralysis using Neuralink's interface to gain direct neural control of a computer cursor.


Elon Musk's Neuralink could soon implant its brain chip in HUMANS

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Elon Musk has demonstrated the Neuralink brain chip in a pig, a monkey and we could soon see preform in a human brain. The firm posted a new job listing for a clinical trial director, which says the right candidate will'work closely with some of the most innovative doctors and top engineers, as well as working with Neuralink's first Clinical Trial participants.' The position is based in Fremont, California and provides the candidate with commuter benefits, meals and'an opportunity to change the world.' It also indicates that the job will mean leading and building'the team responsible for enabling Neuralink's clinical research activities,' as well as adhering to regulations. Neuralink posted a new job listing, first spotted by Bloomberg, for a clinical trial director, which says the right candidate will'work closely with some of the most innovative doctors and top engineers, as well as working with Neuralink's first Clinical Trial participants Although the posting does not say when the trials will begin, Musk revealed last month that they are less than a year away - meaning human trials could start this year.


Elon Musk's brain chip firm Neuralink lines up clinical trials in humans

The Guardian

The billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk's brain chip startup is preparing to launch clinical trials in humans. Musk, who co-founded Neuralink in 2016, has promised that the technology "will enable someone with paralysis to use a smartphone with their mind faster than someone using thumbs". The Silicon Valley company, which has already successfully implanted artificial intelligence microchips in the brains of a macaque monkey named Pager and a pig named Gertrude, is now recruiting for a "clinical trial director" to run tests of the technology in humans. "As the clinical trial director, you'll work closely with some of the most innovative doctors and top engineers, as well as working with Neuralink's first clinical trial participants," the advert for the role in Fremont, California, says. "You will lead and help build the team responsible for enabling Neuralink's clinical research activities and developing the regulatory interactions that come with a fast-paced and ever-evolving environment."


New York company gets jump on Elon Musk's Neuralink with brain-computer interface in clinical trials

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Elon Musk might be well positioned in space travel and electric vehicles, but the world's second-richest person is taking a backseat when it comes to a brain-computer interface (BCI). New York-based Synchron announced Wednesday that it has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to begin clinical trials of its Stentrode motor neuroprosthesis - a brain implant it is hoped could ultimately be used to cure paralysis. The FDA approved Synchron's Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application, according to a release, paving the way for an early feasibility study of Stentrode to begin later this year at New York's Mount Sinai Hospital. New York-based Synchron announced Wednesday that it has received FDA approval to begin clinical trials of Stentrode, its brain-computer interface, beating Elon Musk's Neuralink to a crucial benchmark. The study will analyze the safety and efficacy of the device, smaller than a matchstick, in six patients with severe paralysis. Meanwhile, Musk has been touting Neuralink, his brain-implant startup, for several years--most recently showing a video of a monkey with the chip playing Pong using only signals from its brain.


Neuralink and the Brain's Magical Future - Wait But Why

#artificialintelligence

By the way, you can listen to a neuron fire here (what you're actually hearing is the electro-chemical firing of a neuron, converted to audio). Some electrodes want to take the relationship to the next level and will go for a technique called the patch clamp, whereby it'll get rid of its electrode tip, leaving just a tiny little tube called a glass pipette,21 and it'll actually directly assault a neuron by sucking a "patch" of its membrane into the tube, allowing for even finer measurements:39 A patch clamp also has the benefit that, unlike all the other methods we've discussed, because it's physically touching the neuron, it can not only record but stimulate the neuron,22 injecting current or holding voltage at a set level to do specific tests (other methods can stimulate neurons, but only entire groups together). Finally, electrodes can fully defile the neuron and actually penetrate through the membrane, which is called sharp electrode recording. If the tip is sharp enough, this won't destroy the cell--the membrane will actually seal around the electrode, making it very easy to stimulate the neuron or record the voltage difference between the inside and outside of the neuron. But this is a short-term technique--a punctured neuron won't survive long.