Results


Kalashnikov Reveals Joystick-Controlled, Battery-Powered Flying Bike

International Business Times

However, going by the official video, it doesn't seem to be equipped for flying long distances. Unlike diesel or petrol vehicles, battery-powered flying vehicles are equipped to fly less than an hour, also the thin frame doesn't give room to add much payload to the vehicle and also limits the number of rotors on the vehicle. But the concept can be scaled up and made capable of flying long distances and carrying bigger payloads. But it is not just the Russian military, the U.S. military is also working on a similar concept with Malloy Aeronautics, but that concept currently has a robot riding the hoverbike.


How Robotics Is Helping Military Veterans With Prosthetics

International Business Times

Today, it is ironic to consider a company that specializes in prosthetic limbs building parts for the war machine that unfortunately increases demand on companies making prosthetic limbs. Indeed, the tragedy of war has pushed prosthetics researchers to work ever harder to help service members and veterans who have lost limbs. As a biomedical engineer specializing in prosthetics, I've reviewed grant proposals seeking funding from the VA to research prosthetic limbs for several years. Veterans Administration Rehabilitation Research and Development funds were used to develop the Seattle Foot.


Who is Abdul Hasib? Afghan ISIS Leader Killed In Special Forces Operation

International Business Times

Hasib, who had been leading the faction since predecessor Hafiz Saeed Khan died in a U.S. drone strike last year, was believed the architect of several high-profile attacks, including a March 8 attack on Kabul's main military hospital that left dozens of medical staff and patients dead. Two U.S. Army Rangers also died in the attack that killed Hasib, part of an operation that included drone strikes that began in March along the border with Pakistan. The April 27 raid killed 35 ISIS fighters, including several high-ranking commanders. "This successful joint operation is another important step in our relentless campaign to defeat ISIS-K [Islamic State Khorasan] in 2017," the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, Gen. John Nicholson said in a statement from U.S. military headquarters in Kabul.


US Coast Guard Plans To Use Voice Recognition To Stop Prank Calls

International Business Times

In response to the pranks, which have been happening nearly every day in recent months, the Coast Guard is planning to adopt voice recognition software to identify the phony callers. While these challenges make it hard to eliminate fake callers, voice recognition may be able to catch the pranksters as the Coast Guard believes most of the calls originate from a small number of callers. It's not entirely clear if the Coast Guard's adoption of voice recognition technology will provide any relief from the pranksters; many software systems record an extended conversation -- up to 40 seconds of talking -- to ID a voice accurately, and callers can potentially thwart the system just by disguising how they talk. The voice recognition software likely wouldn't give the Coast Guard what it needs to make such an arrest or obtain a warrant but would be a solution that would mitigate the damage of the calls without leading to jail time for the callers.


Trump Allows CIA Drone Strikes, Reversing Obama Policy: Report

International Business Times

Shifting from the drone policy of the Obama administration, President Donald Trump has given the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) new authority to conduct drone attacks against suspected militants, anonymous U.S. officials said. Under the Obama administration, the CIA used drones and other intelligence resources to locate suspected terrorists and then the military conducted the actual strike. Although officials said that the new authority under Trump is only for CIA's operations in Syria, it is likely the CIA may be able to conduct drone strikes in other areas as well. "There are a lot of problems with the drone program and the targeted killing program, but the CIA should be out of the business of ordering lethal strikes," said Christopher Anders, deputy director of the Washington office of the American Civil Liberties Union.