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Asia Government


Singapore touts need for AI transparency in launch of test toolkit

ZDNet

Businesses in Singapore now will be able to tap a governance testing framework and toolkit to demonstrate their "objective and verifiable" use of artificial intelligence (AI). The move is part of the government's efforts to drive transparency in AI deployments through technical and process checks. Coined A.I. Verify, the new toolkit was developed by the Infocomm Media Development Authority (IMDA) and Personal Data Protection Commission (PDPC), which administers the country's Personal Data Protection Act. The government agencies underscored the need for consumers to know AI systems were "fair, explainable, and safe", as more products and services were embedded with AI to deliver more personalised user experience or make decisions without human intervention. They also needed to be assured that organisations that deploy such offerings were accountable and transparent.


Artificial Intelligence will make Indian roadways safer to travel on

#artificialintelligence

The Indian Ministry of Science and Technology said this unique approach uses the predictive power of AI to identify road hazards and a collision warning system to communicate timely alerts to drivers, to make various safety-related improvements. Artificial intelligence (AI)-powered solutions may soon make roads in India a safer place to drive. The Indian government announced on Tuesday that an AI-powered technology could reduce the risk of road accidents in the country, which have killed more than a lakh people in 2020. In a bid to prevent this from happening, the Indian government said the AI approach will use a first-of-its-kind dataset consisting of 10,000 images. He said that this dataset is finely annotated with 34 classes collected from 182 driving sequences on Indian roads obtained from a front-facing camera attached to a car driving through the cities of Hyderabad, Bangalore and their outskirts.


#NewProfilePic: Warning issued over viral app which hoovers data and sends it to Moscow

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new phone app which offers users a free digital avatar is taking facial-recognition quality photographs and sending them to Moscow, prompting major concerns within the cyber security community. Tens of thousands of people have already uploaded their photographs to the servers of the New Profile Pic app in return to the free avatar. However, many will be unaware that the company behind the app, Linerock Investments, is based in an apartment complex overlooking the Moscow River, beside Russia's Ministry of Defence and just three miles from Red Square. Jake Moore, Global Cybersecurity Advisor, ESET Internet Security told MailOnline that people have to be incredibly careful when uploading photographs or personal data to a brand new website. He said: 'This app is likely a way of capturing people's faces in high resolution and I would question any app wanting this amount of data, especially one which is largely unheard of and based in another country.'


Seadronix raises $5.8M, round led by SoftBank Ventures Asia – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

South Korean startup Seadronix wants to reduce the issue of marine accidents, 75% of which are caused by human error, according to a 2019 Allianz safety and shipping report. The company just secured a $5.8 million Series A extension to scale its AI-based ship berthing monitoring and navigation systems to help cargo ships navigate safely and assist port operators anchoring their vehicles at harbor. The fresh funds, led by SoftBank Ventures Asia, bring Seadronix's the total round up to $8.3 million. Seadronix will use the capital to grow its team beyond the current headcount of 30 employees and enter global markets, including Singapore and Europe, where its "smart ports" are located, Byeolteo Park, CEO and co-founder, said in an interview with TechCrunch. A smart port uses technologies including AI, big data, Internet of Things and 5G to provide more security and save energy by digitalizing the way huge ships enter docks and handle logistics at the ports.


The Turkish Drone That Changed the Nature of Warfare

The New Yorker

This content can also be viewed on the site it originates from. A video posted toward the end of February on the Facebook page of Valerii Zaluzhnyi, the commander-in-chief of Ukraine's armed forces, showed grainy aerial footage of a Russian military convoy approaching the city of Kherson. Russia had invaded Ukraine several days earlier, and Kherson, a shipbuilding hub at the mouth of the Dnieper River, was an important strategic site. At the center of the screen, a targeting system locked onto a vehicle in the middle of the convoy; seconds later, the vehicle exploded, and a tower of burning fuel rose into the sky. The Bayraktar TB2 is a flat, gray unmanned aerial vehicle (U.A.V.), with angled wings and a rear propeller.


Ukraine says drone destroyed Russian landing ship near Snake Island

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Ukraine's defense ministry on Saturday claimed it had sunk a Russian Serna-class landing boat off of the now-famous Snake Island which has stood as a symbol of resistance since the beginning of the war. Undated video footage posted to social media appears to show an airstrike hitting a landing vessel that had soldiers on board. Spokesman for the Odesa Regional Military Administration, Serhii Bratchuk, told Ukrainian news outlet Pravda that Zmiinyi Island – also known as Snake Island – has become "a symbol of our rock-hard endurance and our ability to shatter the enemy's most persistent efforts."


Small Drones Are Giving Ukraine an Unprecedented Edge

WIRED

In the snowy streets of the north Ukrainian town of Trostyanets, the Russian missile system fires rockets every second. Tanks and military vehicles are parked on either side of the blasting artillery system, positioned among houses and near the town's railway system. The weapon is not working alone, though. Hovering tens of meters above it and recording the assault is a Ukrainian drone. The drone isn't a sophisticated military system, but a small, commercial machine that anyone can buy.


China's COVID lockdowns expose the folly of communism

FOX News

'Special Report' All-Star Panel reacts to a federal judge declaring public transportation mask mandates unlawful. Brutal and oppressive lockdowns continue in Shanghai, the latest in a weeks-long effort by the Chinese Communist Party to contain a devastating outbreak of the Omicron variant. Reports from earlier in April estimated that as many as 400 million Chinese citizens were under some form of lockdown. In Shanghai, 25 million citizens today find themselves under a severe lockdown, unable to leave their fenced in, designated districts and, in many cases, unable even to leave their own homes. China's authoritarian actions, taken against their own citizens, should alarm the world.


China's COVID lockdowns are a symptom of deeper problems

FOX News

Gatestone Institute senior fellow Gordon Chang weighs in on Shanghai residents protesting COVID lockdowns on'Fox News Live.' In the spring of 2021, China was reporting only a few dozen COVID cases each day and celebrating a return to steady economic growth. The United States, meanwhile, reeled from its worst death wave of the pandemic. Media outlets around the world, from the Chinese Ministry of Propaganda to the New York Times, were quick to declare that China had "won" the pandemic, having decisively defeated the virus and demonstrated the virtues of unbridled autocracy. Xi Jinping was set to use China's apparent COVID success as a central argument for enshrining himself, at the upcoming Communist Party Congress in October 2022, as emperor-for-life.


Chernobyl scientists want robots and drones to monitor radiation risk

New Scientist

Drones and robots could form part of a new radiation-monitoring system at the Chernobyl power station in Ukraine, as scientists at the plant fear that existing sensor networks built after the nuclear accident in 1986 have been at least partially destroyed by Russian troops. When Russia seized the Chernobyl plant in February, the sensors monitoring gamma radiation levels quickly went offline and most remained that way.