Goto

Collaborating Authors

Asia Government


Deadly drone strikes on UAE raise Gulf tensions and roil oil market

The Japan Times

Iran-backed Yemeni fighters launched drone strikes on the United Arab Emirates that caused explosions and a deadly fire outside the capital, Abu Dhabi, ratcheting up security risks in the major oil-exporting region at a critical time. One of the biggest attacks to date on UAE soil ignited a fire at Abu Dhabi's main international airport on Monday and set fuel tanker trucks ablaze in a nearby industrial area. It took place days after Yemen's Houthi fighters warned Abu Dhabi against intensifying its air campaign against them. Crude extended gains to the highest level in seven years on Tuesday after the assaults in the UAE, OPEC's third biggest oil producer. Iran's longtime support of the Houthis means the incidents could roil regional diplomatic efforts to ease frictions and separate talks to restore Tehran's 2015 nuclear deal with world powers.


Three killed in suspected Houthi drone attacks in UAE: Live

Al Jazeera

A suspected drone attack by Yemen's Houthi rebels targeting a key oil facility in Abu Dhabi killed three people and started a separate fire at Abu Dhabi's international airport, police said. Police in the United Arab Emirates identified the dead as two Indian nationals and one Pakistani. "Small flying objects" were found as three petrol tanks exploded in an industrial area and a fire was ignited at the airport, police said, as Houthi rebels announced "military operations" in the UAE. The UAE which had largely scaled down its military presence in Yemen in 2019, continues to hold sway through the Yemeni forces it armed and trained. Drone attacks are a hallmark of the Houthis' assaults on Saudi Arabia, the UAE ally that is leading the coalition fighting for Yemen's government in the grinding civil war.


Suspected drone attack in Abu Dhabi kills 3 and wounds 6

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. A possible drone attack may have sparked an explosion that struck three oil tankers in Abu Dhabi and another fire at an extension of Abu Dhabi International Airport on Monday that killed three people and wounded six, police said. Abu Dhabi police identified the dead as two Indian nationals and one Pakistani. It did not identify the wounded, who police said suffered minor or moderate wounds.


'Say no to Putin': Ukrainians support protests in Kazakhstan

Al Jazeera

Kyiv, Ukraine – With their country's fate being discussed at this week's US-Russia talks, Ukrainians took to the streets over the weekend to defend their independence and champion an additional cause – that of Kazakhstan's protests. On Sunday, demonstrators in Kyiv and Kharkov, Ukraine's second largest city, held signs that read "Say no to Putin" and flew Kazakhstan flags alongside Ukrainian ones. Kazakhstan's blue and gold flag also appeared in the winter skies over Kyiv on Saturday, flown from a drone in an act of protest organised by Dronarium, an unmanned aerial vehicle enthusiast community known for political statements. "Every nation has the right to protect their socioeconomic and political rights through peaceful protest," said drone operator Vitaly Shevchuk."We After a week of violent protests that began over a hike in fuel prices and quickly spread across the country – leaving at least 164 dead, 2,000 injured and almost 6,000 arrested – a Russian-led military alliance has now restored control of Kazakhstan to the government. The Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO), an alliance of several former Soviet states, deployed about 2,500 troops to Kazakhstan to help quell the protest, including Russian paratroopers who are guarding "vital facilities and social infrastructure," a Russian Defence Ministry statement said. Critics have accused Russia of "occupation" over its involvement, with Kazakh Mukhtar Ablyazov, a former minister turned opposition leader, warning President Vladimir Putin will draw the country into "a structure like the Soviet Union" unless the West intervenes. Motivated more by their own hopes to defy Putin than in sharing a common cause with the protests, Ukrainians also urged resistance. "The dictator [Putin] wants to rebuild the USSR by force," said Olga Angelova, who was among the protesters in Kyiv. "He must be stopped – we Ukrainians will resist the occupiers.



Top 10 Emerging Indian Artificial Intelligence Start-Ups of 2022

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence or AI technology has taken over almost every organization, available on this planet. Be it a big company or a start-up, business leaders choose AI technology over any other traditional IT practices, as they believe artificial intelligence or AI will be the key element behind their business' success. As artificial intelligence is gradually gaining popularity in the Indian domestic market, several AI startups in India, have started emerging. According to the AIM Research, AI Start-ups in India successfully raised US$836.3 million in 2020, and in the same year, the Government of India had increased the expenditure for Digital India to US$477 million, to develop artificial intelligence or AI models for the newly emerging artificial intelligence start-ups in India. Several AI start-ups have sprung up in India, but only a few were able to create a mark in the Indian domestic market.


La veille de la cybersécurité

#artificialintelligence

Over the past six months, the Chinese government has rolled out a series of policy documents and public pronouncements that are finally putting meat on the bone of the country's governance regime for artificial intelligence (AI). Given China's track record of leveraging AI for mass surveillance, it's tempting to view these initiatives as little more than a fig leaf to cover widespread abuses of human rights. Anyone who wants to compete against, cooperate with, or simply understand China's AI ecosystem must examine these moves closely.


China's New AI Governance Initiatives Shouldn't Be Ignored

#artificialintelligence

Over the past six months, the Chinese government has rolled out a series of policy documents and public pronouncements that are finally putting meat on the bone of the country's governance regime for artificial intelligence (AI). Given China's track record of leveraging AI for mass surveillance, it's tempting to view these initiatives as little more than a fig leaf to cover widespread abuses of human rights. Anyone who wants to compete against, cooperate with, or simply understand China's AI ecosystem must examine these moves closely. These recent initiatives show the emergence of three different approaches to AI governance, each championed by a different branch of the Chinese bureaucracy, and each at a different level of maturity. Their backers also pack very different bureaucratic punches.


A New AI Lexicon: C is for Consent

#artificialintelligence

The collection of vast amounts of data is necessary to the functioning of AI and machine learning based systems. Where that data is personal data, the idea of consent, informed consent, and the redundancy of consent have become a part of debates on technology and rights. Governments across the world are looking to the potential of AI to open new markets and drive economic growth. In 2018, the Government of India, through Niti Aayog (formerly the Planning Commission), released a discussion paper titled'National Strategy for Artificial Intelligence.' This document stated that "for accelerated adoption of a highly collaborative technology like AI, the government has to play the critical role of a catalyst in supporting partnerships, providing access to infrastructure, fostering innovation through research and creating the demand by seeking solutions for addressing various governmental needs."


Chinese tech companies must undergo government cyber review to list overseas

ZDNet

China on Tuesday evening confirmed it will increase oversight on how local tech companies operate their platforms both locally and overseas through two new sets of rules. The first set of rules, set to be enforced on February 15, is focused on cybersecurity reviews and will require local tech companies with personal information on over 1 million users to undergo a security review before being allowed to list onto overseas stock exchanges. Announced by the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC), the rules did not specify whether cybersecurity reviews would be required for companies that list in Hong Kong. As part of a cybersecurity review process, the Chinese government can urge tech companies to make organisational changes to fulfil their commitments to the cybersecurity review. The CAC said the new listing requirement was established to address the risk of key infrastructure, data, and personal information being used maliciously by foreign actors.