Military


US government is funding research into technology that will connect soldiers' brains to computers

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is funding research that could give a future generation of soldiers the power to control machines and weapons with their minds. The agency said it will fund six organizations through the Next-Generation Nonsurgical Neurotechnology (N3) program who will work to design and build interfaces for application in the U.S. military, that could be worn be soldiers and translate their brain signals into instructions. Those instructions could be used to control swarms of unmanned aerial vehicles, wield cyber defense systems, or facilitate military communications. Soldiers may be able to control vehicles and more by using only their minds under a new initiative from the U.S. Department of Defense. While the feat may sound firmly in the realm of science fiction, according to DARPA it is setting a completion date within four years.


South Korea is developing nature-inspired military surveillance robots

Daily Mail - Science & tech

South Korea is developing robots that mimic wildlife adapted for all environments on Earth for military warfare. The nature inspired technology, known as biomimetics, will form part of the country's future weapons systems and help its soldiers in battles. Robot designs inspired by birds, snakes and marine species aim to cover both surveillance and combat via sea, land and sky. It is an attempt to catch up with neighbouring countries such as China and Russia who have made huge advances in the application of the technology, said a defence agency personnel. South Korea is developing a range of robots that mimic wildlife adapted for all environments on Earth for military warfare.


Noise-cancelling headsets worn by soldiers can reveal the position of a sniper after a single shot

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Locations of enemy snipers shooting at troops may soon be revealed instantly on the smartphones of the ambushed troops. Cutting-edge audio technology is being developed to use microphones in the ears of the soldiers to track two notable noises from a bullet - supersonic air in front of the bullet and the blast as it leaves the muzzle. Technology is being developed to use these two sounds to trace the original location and reveal where it was fired from. The data and location will then be relayed to the handset of the beleaguered troops to help them identify and neutralise the threat. Audio experts that developed the technology say it builds on existing technology and could be employed on the battlefield in just two years.


Self-driving tanks and swarms of deadly drones are being developed by Russia

Daily Mail

An army of'killer robots' that will assist infantry on the battlefield has been unveiled in propaganda footage released by Russia The video, released by the Kremlin, appears to showcase the state's latest drone technology. That includes and AI-controlled driverless tank that follow the aim of a soldier's rifle to obliterate targets with its own weaponry. Russia's Advanced Research Foundation (ARF) said the ultimate goal is to have an army of robots entirely controlled by Artificial Intelligence algorithms. Currently the drones are deployed alongside infantry who remotely control the vehicles, but in the future the tech will be fully autonomous. That means the military hardware will be able to target and kill enemies without any human intervention.


AI could help identify Civil War veterans in your family

FOX News

A computer science professor has built a tool that could allow people to identify Civil War veterans in their families with the help of artificial intelligence. Kurt Luther, an assistant professor at Virginia Tech, developed a platform called Photo Sleuth after he discovered a picture of a distant relative who had fought in the Civil War. "Seeing my distant relative staring back at me was like traveling through time," said Luther in a statement. "Historical photos can tell us a lot about not only our own familial history, but also inform the historical record of the time more broadly than just reading about the event in a history book." The professor, who considers himself a history buff, was inspired to create the software when he visited the Heinz History Center's exhibit called "Pennsylvania's Civil War" in Pittsburgh in 2013.


Army Harnessing Power of AI to Build Smarter Robots U.S. Veterans Magazine

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It's time for robots to replace soldiers for certain specialized tasks involving "dull, dirty or dangerous work and to reduce their cognitive load," said Maj. Gen. Cedric T. Wins. So the Army is now investing $30 million to harness the power of big data analytics, machine learning and artificial intelligence to create unmanned ground and aerial vehicles, such as future vertical lift and the next generation combat vehicle, said Wins, who is the commander of U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM). Mark J. Shepard, commander of the USCG's National Strike Force (right) hear about the array of robots the PEO CS&CSS Robot Logistics Support Center manages. The RLSC transferred 18 robots from its life cycle management team to the USCG for use in the fleet's Strike Force Teams in May. The RLSC will also provide training and support for all 18 systems.


UK troops to be given palm-sized drones to monitor enemies on the battlefield

Daily Mail

Help is at hand for troops on the front lines thanks to palm-sized drones developed by the the Ministry of Defence (MOD). British Army plans will see 200 miniature drones'smaller than a human hand' deployed on the battlefield to provide soldiers with an eye in the sky. These mini-drones, dubbed Black Hornet, could take over the life-threatening surveillance and reconnaissance duties currently undertaken by soldiers. The MOD is investing £66million ($87m) in robotic systems, which will also include automated supply delivery drones. TheBlack Hornet3 is the world's smallest tactical nano UAV (unmanned Aerial vehicle) and is used by the British military on the front line.


The US Army wants us to pretend autonomous tanks aren't killer robots

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There's been a recent hullabaloo over the US Army developing killer robots, but we're here to set you straight. The US Army's "Advanced Targeting and Lethality Automated System" (ATLAS) project isn't what you think. I know it sounds bad, but if you ignore every other word it's actually quite palatable. "Advanced and Automated" sounds pretty good doesn't it? Those are probably the only words you should focus on.


Report slams Colombia for promoting officer tied to slayings

FOX News

BOGOTA, Colombia – Human Rights Watch is denouncing Colombia's government for appointing at least nine officers to key army positions despite credible evidence implicating them in serious human rights violations during the country's long civil conflict. The human rights organization released a report Wednesday condemning the government of President Ivan Duque for promoting Gen. Nicasio de Jesus Martinez Espinel as army chief and promoting eight other officers linked to abuses. The men are "credibly implicated" in what is known as the "false positive" scandal, in which security forces killed several thousand civilians during the height of the military's offensive against leftist guerrillas and counted them as rebels to inflate combat deaths to obtain coveted bonuses, the group said. "The Colombian government should be investigating officers credibly linked to extrajudicial executions, not appointing them to the army's top command positions," said Jose Miguel Vivanco, Americas director for Human Rights Watch. He said their appointments send a troubling message to troops: "That engaging in these abuses may not be an obstacle for career success."


Technica Aims to Help Army Process Battlefield Data With AI Tech; Brendon Unland Quoted

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The U.S. Army Research Laboratory has partnered with Technica to develop a system that would use artificial intelligence algorithms to collect data from multiple devices and allow soldiers to exchange information in areas where connectivity is limited, Nextgov reported Friday. "We want to try to put deep learning and AI into the hands of the soldier," Brendon Unland, senior technology architect at Technica, told Nextgov in an interview. ARL awarded the company a $1M research and development contract in mid-January to build a "fog computing" platform designed to support data processing even at locations without network access or in the cloud. The system, called SmartFog, would use AI or machine learning to analyze incoming data streams in real-time and aid soldiers in decisionmaking. Unland added the company will develop algorithms that could be trained to detect vehicle maintenance problems, network attacks or other anomalies.