Military


Foe accused by Maduro says Venezuela military is fracturing

FOX News

BOGOTA, Colombia – The exiled opposition leader accused by Venezuelan authorities of directing a failed plot to assassinate President Nicolas Maduro says the greatest threat to the embattled socialist leader may be his detractors in uniform standing quietly behind him. Julio Borges, who once led Venezuela's opposition-controlled National Assembly, said Tuesday that the arrests of two high-ranking military officers in connection with the attack using drones loaded with plastic explosives is yet another signal that fractures within the nation's armed forces are growing. "The conflict today is within the government -- not just at the political level, but more importantly within the armed forces," Borges said in an interview with The Associated Press in Colombia's capital. His comments came hours after Venezuela's chief prosecutor announced the arrest of Gen. Alejandro Perez and Col. Pedro Zambrano from Venezuela's National Guard as part of the investigation into the Aug. 4 attack. Their alleged roles were not described.


Robots learn by 'following the leader' -- GCN

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Scientists at the Army Research Laboratory and Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute are teaching robots how to be better mission partners to soldiers -- starting with how to find their way with minimal human intervention. Given that autonomous vehicles have been navigating streets in many U.S. cities for over a year, that may seem like not that big a deal. But according to ARL researcher Maggie Wigness, the challenges facing military robots are much greater. Specifically, unlike the self-driving cars being developed by Google, Uber and others, military robots will be operating in complex environments that don't have the benefit of standardized markings like lanes, street signs, curbs and traffic lights. "Environments that we operate in are highly unstructured compared to [those for] self-driving cars," Wigness said.


Rebooting the Ethical Soldier AI Latest Technology News Prosyscom

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Gradually, perhaps imperceptibly, automated systems will function so much more efficiently that humans will become mere bystanders. The soldier will become the slowest element in an engagement, or will simply become irrelevant. Adherence to the rules of war will become less relevant as well. A separate set of ethical questions are raised by the technologies of human "enhancement" and augmentation, which include improving physical strength, stamina and pain tolerance, as well as using neurological implants and stimulation to restore brain function and enhance learning. Can soldiers under the influence of behavior-modifying drugs or electronics be held to account for their actions?


Will Venezuela's President Use the Mysterious Drone Attack to Seize More Power?

Slate

The Venezuelan government's account of Saturday's attempted assassination-by-drone of President Nicolás Maduro has raised more questions than it has answered. Here's what we know: A video of the event shows the chaos that ensued when the drones exploded, with Maduro abruptly stopping his speech and soldiers in the crowd fleeing. The president was unharmed, but seven National Guard soldiers were injured. Hours later, Maduro appeared on national television to accuse the outgoing Colombian president, Juan Manuel Santos, and far-right elements in the U.S. of plotting the alleged attack. A little-known group called "Soldados de Franelas" claimed responsibility for the attack on Twitter.


Maduro says 'far right,' Colombian president behind assassination attempt using drones

The Japan Times

CARACAS – Drones armed with explosives detonated near Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro in an apparent assassination attempt that took place while he was delivering a speech to hundreds of soldiers being broadcast live on television, officials said. Caught by surprise mid-speech, Maduro and his wife, Cilia Flores, looked up at the sky and winced after hearing the sound of an explosion pierce the air. "This was an attempt to kill me," he said later in an impassioned retelling of the events. "Today they attempted to assassinate me." Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez said the incident took place shortly after 5:30 p.m. as Maduro was celebrating the National Guard's 81st anniversary.


Venezuela's Maduro: Drone attack was attempt to kill him

FOX News

CARACAS, Venezuela – Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro dodged an apparent assassination attempt when drones armed with explosives detonated while he was delivering a speech to hundreds of soldiers being broadcast live on television, officials said. Caught by surprise mid-speech, Maduro and his wife, Cilia Flores, looked up at the sky and winced Saturday after hearing the sound of an explosion pierce the air. "This was an attempt to kill me," he said later in an impassioned retelling of the events. "Today they attempted to assassinate me." Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez said the incident took place shortly after 5:30 p.m. as Maduro was celebrating the National Guard's 81st anniversary.


Soldiers seen running after 'drone attack'

BBC News

Venezuelan officials say explosive drones went off as President Nicolás Maduro was giving a live televised speech in Caracas, but he is unharmed.


Venezuelan government: Drone strikes targeted Maduro

FOX News

CARACAS, Venezuela – Drones armed with explosives detonated near Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro as he gave a speech to hundreds of soldiers in Caracas on Saturday but the socialist leader was unharmed, according to the government. Seven people were injured in the apparent attack which came as Maduro celebrated the National Guard's 81st anniversary, said Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez. Maduro's speech was abruptly cut short and soldiers could be seen breaking ranks and scattering. "At exactly 5:41 p.m. in the afternoon several explosions were heard," Rodriguez said in a live address to the nation minutes after the incident. "The investigation clearly reveals they came from drone-like devices that carried explosives."


David Icke Pentagon Signs $885 Million Artificial Intelligence Contract with Booz Allen

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'The U.S. Department of Defense will for the first time be using large-scale artificial intelligence systems that could automate mundane tasks and augment the work of military members as a result of an $885 million five-year contract, said Josh Sullivan, senior vice president at government consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton. The technology will allow the Defense Department to better compete with nations including China and Russia, said Mr. Sullivan, who leads the analytics business for Booz Allen. "Part of this is (about) making sure our government has the access to the best technology and using it responsibly in service of our citizens and warfighters," he said. The use of AI systems such as neural networks that mimic the human brain could help the Defense Department sift through the "overwhelming" amount of data related to such areas as national security and health care. In turn, soldiers and military members can be freed up to identify threats on the battlefield sooner, spend more time with military patients and work on problems that require higher-level contextual reasoning, Mr. Sullivan said.


Pentagon Signs $885 Million Artificial Intelligence Contract with Booz Allen

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The technology will allow the Defense Department to better compete with nations including China and Russia, said Mr. Sullivan, who leads the analytics business for Booz Allen. "Part of this is (about) making sure our government has the access to the best technology and using it responsibly in service of our citizens and warfighters," he said. The use of AI systems such as neural networks that mimic the human brain could help the Defense Department sift through the "overwhelming" amount of data related to such areas as national security and health care. In turn, soldiers and military members can be freed up to identify threats on the battlefield sooner, spend more time with military patients and work on problems that require higher-level contextual reasoning, Mr. Sullivan said. For example, hundreds of soldiers today watch video feeds from drones and cameras and do basic labeling and object identification, he said.