Results


FaceApp removes 'Ethnicity Filters' after racism storm

Daily Mail

When asked to make his picture'hot' the app lightened his skin and changed the shape of his nose The app's creators claim it will'transform your face using Artificial Intelligence', allowing selfie-takers to transform their photos Earlier this year people accused the popular photo editing app Meitu of being racist. Earlier this year people accused the popular photo editing app Meitu of giving users'yellow face'. Earlier this year people accused the popular photo editing app Meitu of giving users'yellow face'. Twitter user Vaughan posted a picture of Kanye West with a filter applied, along with the caption: 'So Meitu's pretty racist'


Inside Google's Internet Justice League and Its AI-Powered War on Trolls

#artificialintelligence

The 28-year-old journalist and author of The Internet of Garbage, a book on spam and online harassment, had been watching Bernie Sanders boosters attacking feminists and supporters of the Black Lives Matter movement. Now a small subsidiary of Google named Jigsaw is about to release an entirely new type of response: a set of tools called Conversation AI. Jigsaw is applying artificial intelligence to solve the very human problem of making people be nicer on the Internet. If it can find a path through that free-speech paradox, Jigsaw will have pulled off an unlikely coup: applying artificial intelligence to solve the very human problem of making people be nicer on the Internet.


The latest NSA leak is a reminder that your bosses can see your every move

Washington Post

The answer, according to some former NSA analysts, is that the agency routinely monitors many of its employees' computer activity. It is a $200 million-a-year industry, according to a study last year by 451 Research, a technology research firm, and is estimated to be worth $500 million by 2020. Employee monitoring recently came to light in a high-profile lawsuit involving Uber and Waymo, the self-driving car company owned by Google's parent firm, Alphabet. Privacy advocates have been pushing for years to have Congress review various communications privacy laws in light of updates to technology.


ACLU Challenges Warrant for Pipeline Protest Facebook Data

U.S. News

"Political speech and the freedom to engage in political activity without being subjected to undue government scrutiny are at the heart of the First Amendment," ACLU of Washington staff attorney La Rond Baker said in a statement announcing the filing. "Further, the Fourth Amendment prohibits the government from performing broad fishing expeditions into private affairs. And seizing information from Facebook accounts simply because they are associated with protests of the government violates these core constitutional principles."


The March on Austin: Washington Casts a Shadow on SXSW

#artificialintelligence

For the creators, marketers and entrepreneurs descending this weekend on Austin, Texas, politics in the wake of President Trump will surely be top of mind, perhaps even overshadowing some of the innovation in virtual reality and artificial intelligence. This year's dialog will focus on how "social media can drive organized protests and provide support for causes our current administration has reprioritized," like the environment, gender equality and women's rights, said Neil Carty, senior VP-innovation strategy at consultancy MediaLink. "There is a shift away from interruptive TV ads to content people want to watch in its own right," said Jody Raida, director-branded entertainment at McGarryBowen. Artificial intelligence and virtual reality will also be hot, with dozens of sessions dedicated to the technologies, along with the application of chatbots and live video.


How artificial intelligence can be corrupted to repress free speech

#artificialintelligence

By keeping ISPs and websites under threat of closure, the government is able to leverage that additional labor force to help monitor a larger population than it would otherwise be able to. This past July, the Cyberspace Administration of China, the administration in charge of online censorship, issued new rules to websites and service providers that enabled the government to punish any outlet that publishes "directly as news reports unverified content found on online platforms such as social media." And the Supreme Court, especially the Roberts Court, has been, on the main, a strong defender of free expression," Danielle Keats Citron, professor of law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, wrote to Engadget. "Context is crucial to many free-speech questions like whether a threat amounts to a true threat and whether a person is a limited-purpose public figure," professor Keats Citron told Engadget.


How artificial intelligence can be corrupted to repress free speech

#artificialintelligence

According to a 2016 report from internet liberty watchdog, Freedom House, two-thirds of all internet users reside in countries where criticism of the ruling administration is censored -- 27 percent of them live in nations where posting, sharing or supporting unpopular opinions on social media can get you arrested. This past July, the Cyberspace Administration of China, the administration in charge of online censorship, issued new rules to websites and service providers which enabled the government to punish any outlet that publishes "directly as news reports unverified content found on online platforms such as social media." And the Supreme Court, especially the Roberts Court, has been, on the main, a strong defender of free expression," Danielle Keats Citron, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, wrote to Engadget. "Context is crucial to many free speech questions like whether a threat amounts to a true threat and whether a person is a limited purpose public figure," Professor Keats Citron told Engadget.


How artificial intelligence can be corrupted to repress free speech

Engadget

According to a 2016 report from internet liberty watchdog, Freedom House, two-thirds of all internet users reside in countries where criticism of the ruling administration is censored -- 27 percent of them live in nations where posting, sharing or supporting unpopular opinions on social media can get you arrested. This past July, the Cyberspace Administration of China, the administration in charge of online censorship, issued new rules to websites and service providers which enabled the government to punish any outlet that publishes "directly as news reports unverified content found on online platforms such as social media." And the Supreme Court, especially the Roberts Court, has been, on the main, a strong defender of free expression," Danielle Keats Citron, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, wrote to Engadget. The popular game managed to reduce toxic language and the abuse of other players by 11 percent and 6.2 percent, respectively, after LoL's developer, RiotGames, instituted an automated notification system that reminded players not to be jerks at various points throughout each match.


Twitter and Dataminr block government 'spy centers' from seeing user data

The Guardian

Twitter has blocked federally funded "domestic spy centers" from using a powerful social media monitoring tool after public records revealed that the government had special access to users' information for controversial surveillance efforts. The American Civil Liberties Union of California discovered that so-called fusion centers, which collect intelligence, had access to monitoring technology from Dataminr, an analytics company partially owned by Twitter. Records that the ACLU obtained uncovered that a fusion center in southern California had access to Dataminr's "geospatial analysis application", which allowed the government to do location-based tracking as well as searches tied to keywords. In October, the ACLU obtained government records revealing that Twitter, Facebook and Instagram had provided users' data to Geofeedia, a software company that aids police surveillance programs and has targeted protesters of color.


Inside Google's Internet Justice League and Its AI-Powered War on Trolls

WIRED

Now a small subsidiary of Google named Jigsaw is about to release an entirely new type of response: a set of tools called Conversation AI. Jigsaw is applying artificial intelligence to solve the very human problem of making people be nicer on the Internet. If it can find a path through that free-speech paradox, Jigsaw will have pulled off an unlikely coup: applying artificial intelligence to solve the very human problem of making people be nicer on the Internet. "Jigsaw recruits will hear stories about people being tortured for their passwords or of state-sponsored cyberbullying."