Goto

Collaborating Authors

Results


Biden's New Deal and the Future of Human Capital

The New Yorker

No one in Washington seems to know what the story is, or even where to set the dateline. Is it the culture war over masks, in the Florida sunshine? Is it the crisis along the southern border? CNN's prime-time viewership is down thirty-seven per cent, MSNBC's numbers are not much better, and even Fox's are in decline. The morning political-newsletter writers, and many of the rest of us, have been reduced to replaying the dramas of the Trump Administration (Why is John Boehner backing an Ohio congressman whom Trump opposes?) or even the Obama years (How much hold does Larry Summers have on the Democratic Party?). For a moment this week the story was whether one of the Bidens' German shepherds, Major, has a biting problem.


The Future Of AI In Post-Covid Healthcare

#artificialintelligence

Kira Radinsky, co-founder and Chairman of Diagnostic Robotics, wants to make healthcare more affordable and accessible. The lessons learned from initial deployments of the startup's AI-based digital triage platform in Israel and the U.S. and the valuable experience gained during the Covid-19 pandemic, point to a future of better healthcare: Providing the right treatment at the right time in the most appropriate setting. At the Mayo Clinic, Diagnostic Robotics' triage platform suggests possible diagnoses and provides a risk score for each patient based on their answers to questions regarding their medical conditions. The Mayo Clinic's Dr. John Halamka calls it "Waze for healthcare," stressing its use as a navigation system, matching patients with the right healthcare resource at the hospital's emergency room or even before they arrive there. The State of Rhode Island has used Diagnostic Robotics' platform to help manage its response to the Covid-19 pandemic.


The Future of Artificial Intelligence: Language, Ethics, Technology

#artificialintelligence

Established at the University of Cambridge in 2001, the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH) works actively with the Schools and Faculties across the University undertaking collaborations that cross faculties and disciplines in order to stimulate fresh thinking and dialogue in and beyond the humanities and social sciences and to reach out to new collaborators and new publics.


The Future of Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

June 8, 2019 Updated: April 20, 2020 "[AI] is going to change the world more than anything in the history of mankind. AI oracle and venture capitalist Dr. Kai-Fu Lee, 2018 In a nondescript building close to downtown Chicago, Marc Gyongyosi and the small but growing crew of IFM / Onetrack.AI have one rule that rules them all: think simple. The words are written in simple font on a simple sheet of paper that's stuck to a rear upstairs wall of their industrial two-story workspace. Sitting at his cluttered desk, located near an oft-used ping-pong table and prototypes of drones from his college days suspended overhead, Gyongyosi punches some keys on a laptop to pull up grainy video footage of a forklift driver operating his vehicle in a warehouse. It was captured from overhead courtesy of a Onetrack.AI "forklift vision system." The Future of Artificial Intelligence Artificial intelligence is impacting the future of virtually every industry and every human being. Artificial intelligence has acted as the main driver of emerging technologies like big data, robotics and IoT, and it will continue to act as a technological innovator for the foreseeable future. Employing machine learning and computer vision for detection and classification of various "safety events," the shoebox-sized device doesn't see all, but it sees plenty. Like which way the driver is looking as he operates the vehicle, how fast he's driving, where he's driving, locations of the people around him and how other forklift operators are maneuvering their vehicles. IFM's software automatically detects safety violations (for example, cell phone use) and notifies warehouse managers so they can take immediate action. The main goals are to prevent accidents and increase efficiency. The mere knowledge that one of IFM's devices is watching, Gyongyosi claims, has had "a huge effect." Marc Gyongyosi Photo Credit: IFM/OneTrack.AI The lower level of IFM was designed to mimic a warehouse environment so products can be effectively tested on site. Photo Credit: IFM/OneTrack.AI "If you think about a camera, it really is the richest sensor available to us today at a very interesting price point," he says. "Because of smartphones, camera and image sensors have become incredibly inexpensive, yet we capture a lot of information.


The Future of Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

"[AI] is going to change the world more than anything in the history of mankind. AI oracle and venture capitalist Dr. Kai-Fu Lee, 2018 In a nondescript building close to downtown Chicago, Marc Gyongyosi and the small but growing crew of IFM/Onetrack.AI have one rule that rules them all: think simple. The words are written in simple font on a simple sheet of paper that's stuck to a rear upstairs wall of their industrial two-story workspace. Sitting at his cluttered desk, located near an oft-used ping-pong table and prototypes of drones from his college days suspended overhead, Gyongyosi punches some keys on a laptop to pull up grainy video footage of a forklift driver operating his vehicle in a warehouse. It was captured from overhead courtesy of a Onetrack.AI "forklift vision system." Employing machine learning and computer vision for detection and classification of various "safety events," the shoebox-sized device doesn't see all, but it sees plenty. Like which way the driver is looking as he operates the vehicle, how fast he's driving, where he's driving, locations of the people around him and how other forklift operators are maneuvering their vehicles. IFM's software automatically detects safety violations (for example, cell phone use) and notifies warehouse managers so they can take immediate action. The main goals are to prevent accidents and increase efficiency. The mere knowledge that one of IFM's devices is watching, Gyongyosi claims, has had "a huge effect." "If you think about a camera, it really is the richest sensor available to us today at a very interesting price point," he says. "Because of smartphones, camera and image sensors have become incredibly inexpensive, yet we capture a lot of information.



GPT-3 Creative Fiction

#artificialintelligence

What if I told a story here, how would that story start?" Thus, the summarization prompt: "My second grader asked me what this passage means: …" When a given prompt isn't working and GPT-3 keeps pivoting into other modes of completion, that may mean that one hasn't constrained it enough by imitating a correct output, and one needs to go further; writing the first few words or sentence of the target output may be necessary.



Why aren't people smarter? The dubious benefits of intelligence, real or artificial

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) promises to make the human race smarter. Raymond Kurzweil has made predicting the Singularity -- when artificial intelligence exceeds human intelligence -- a cottage industry. Is AI going to make us all smarter, or are we already as smart as we can handle? This TechRepublic Premium ebook compiles the latest on cancelled conferences, cybersecurity attacks, remote work tips, and the impact this pandemic is having on the tech industry. Some of our issues are cognitive, such as our inherent inability to estimate exponential functions.


Spies Like AI: The Future of Artificial Intelligence for the US Intelligence Community

#artificialintelligence

America's intelligence collectors are already using AI in ways big and small, to scan the news for dangerous developments, send alerts to ships about rapidly changing conditions, and speed up the NSA's regulatory compliance efforts. But before the IC can use AI to its full potential, it must be hardened against attack. The humans who use it -- analysts, policy-makers and leaders -- must better understand how advanced AI systems reach their conclusions. Dean Souleles is working to put AI into practice at different points across the U.S. intelligence community, in line with the ODNI's year-old strategy. The chief technology advisor to the principal deputy to the Director of National Intelligence wasn't allowed to discuss everything that he's doing, but he could talk about a few examples.