Results


Mental Stress Detection using Data from Wearable and Non-wearable Sensors: A Review

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This paper presents a comprehensive review of methods covering significant subjective and objective human stress detection techniques available in the literature. The methods for measuring human stress responses could include subjective questionnaires (developed by psychologists) and objective markers observed using data from wearable and non-wearable sensors. In particular, wearable sensor-based methods commonly use data from electroencephalography, electrocardiogram, galvanic skin response, electromyography, electrodermal activity, heart rate, heart rate variability, and photoplethysmography both individually and in multimodal fusion strategies. Whereas, methods based on non-wearable sensors include strategies such as analyzing pupil dilation and speech, smartphone data, eye movement, body posture, and thermal imaging. Whenever a stressful situation is encountered by an individual, physiological, physical, or behavioral changes are induced which help in coping with the challenge at hand. A wide range of studies has attempted to establish a relationship between these stressful situations and the response of human beings by using different kinds of psychological, physiological, physical, and behavioral measures. Inspired by the lack of availability of a definitive verdict about the relationship of human stress with these different kinds of markers, a detailed survey about human stress detection methods is conducted in this paper. In particular, we explore how stress detection methods can benefit from artificial intelligence utilizing relevant data from various sources. This review will prove to be a reference document that would provide guidelines for future research enabling effective detection of human stress conditions.


The impact of feature importance methods on the interpretation of defect classifiers

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Abstract--Classifier specific (CS) and classifier agnostic (CA) feature importance methods are widely used (often interchangeably) by prior studies to derive feature importance ranks from a defect classifier. However, different feature importance methods are likely to compute different feature importance ranks even for the same dataset and classifier. Hence such interchangeable use of feature importance methods can lead to conclusion instabilities unless there is a strong agreement among different methods. Therefore, in this paper, we evaluate the agreement between the feature importance ranks associated with the studied classifiers through a case study of 18 software projects and six commonly used classifiers. We find that: 1) The computed feature importance ranks by CA and CS methods do not always strongly agree with each other. Such findings raise concerns about the stability of conclusions across replicated studies. We further observe that the commonly used defect datasets are rife with feature interactions and these feature interactions impact the computed feature importance ranks of the CS methods (not the CA methods). We demonstrate that removing these feature interactions, even with simple methods like CFS improves agreement between the computed feature importance ranks of CA and CS methods. In light of our findings, we provide guidelines for stakeholders and practitioners when performing model interpretation and directions for future research, e.g., future research is needed to investigate the impact of advanced feature interaction removal methods on computed feature importance ranks of different CS methods. We note, however, that a CS method is not always readily available for Defect classifiers are widely used by many large software corporations a given classifier. Defect classifiers are commonly and deep neural networks do not have a widely accepted CS interpreted to uncover insights to improve software quality. Therefore it is the feature importance ranks of different classifiers is pivotal that these generated insights are reliable. Such CA methods measure the contribution of each feature a feature importance method to compute a ranking of feature towards a classifier's predictions. These measure the contribution of each feature by effecting changes to feature importance ranks reflect the order in which the studied that particular feature in the dataset and observing its impact on features contribute to the predictive capability of the studied the outcome. The primary advantage of CA methods is that they classifier [14].


Learning Representations of Entities and Relations

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Encoding facts as representations of entities and binary relationships between them, as learned by knowledge graph representation models, is useful for various tasks, including predicting new facts, question answering, fact checking and information retrieval. The focus of this thesis is on (i) improving knowledge graph representation with the aim of tackling the link prediction task; and (ii) devising a theory on how semantics can be captured in the geometry of relation representations. Most knowledge graphs are very incomplete and manually adding new information is costly, which drives the development of methods which can automatically infer missing facts. The first contribution of this thesis is HypER, a convolutional model which simplifies and improves upon the link prediction performance of the existing convolutional state-of-the-art model ConvE and can be mathematically explained in terms of constrained tensor factorisation. The second contribution is TuckER, a relatively straightforward linear model, which, at the time of its introduction, obtained state-of-the-art link prediction performance across standard datasets. The third contribution is MuRP, first multi-relational graph representation model embedded in hyperbolic space. MuRP outperforms all existing models and its Euclidean counterpart MuRE in link prediction on hierarchical knowledge graph relations whilst requiring far fewer dimensions. Despite the development of a large number of knowledge graph representation models with gradually increasing predictive performance, relatively little is known of the latent structure they learn. We generalise recent theoretical understanding of how semantic relations of similarity, paraphrase and analogy are encoded in the geometric interactions of word embeddings to how more general relations, as found in knowledge graphs, can be encoded in their representations.


Network-level Safety Metrics for Overall Traffic Safety Assessment: A Case Study

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Driving safety analysis has recently witnessed unprecedented results due to advances in computation frameworks, connected vehicle technology, new generation sensors, and artificial intelligence (AI). Particularly, the recent advances performance of deep learning (DL) methods realized higher levels of safety for autonomous vehicles and empowered volume imagery processing for driving safety analysis. An important application of DL methods is extracting driving safety metrics from traffic imagery. However, the majority of current methods use safety metrics for micro-scale analysis of individual crash incidents or near-crash events, which does not provide insightful guidelines for the overall network-level traffic management. On the other hand, large-scale safety assessment efforts mainly emphasize spatial and temporal distributions of crashes, while not always revealing the safety violations that cause crashes. To bridge these two perspectives, we define a new set of network-level safety metrics for the overall safety assessment of traffic flow by processing imagery taken by roadside infrastructure sensors. An integrative analysis of the safety metrics and crash data reveals the insightful temporal and spatial correlation between the representative network-level safety metrics and the crash frequency. The analysis is performed using two video cameras in the state of Arizona along with a 5-year crash report obtained from the Arizona Department of Transportation. The results confirm that network-level safety metrics can be used by the traffic management teams to equip traffic monitoring systems with advanced AI-based risk analysis, and timely traffic flow control decisions.


Fake Hilsa Fish Detection Using Machine Vision

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Hilsa is the national fish of Bangladesh. Bangladesh is earning a lot of foreign currency by exporting this fish. Unfortunately, in recent days, some unscrupulous businessmen are selling fake Hilsa fishes to gain profit. The Sardines and Sardinella are the most sold in the market as Hilsa. The government agency of Bangladesh, namely Bangladesh Food Safety Authority said that these fake Hilsa fish contain high levels of cadmium and lead which are detrimental for humans. In this research, we have proposed a method that can readily identify original Hilsa fish and fake Hilsa fish. Based on the research available on online literature, we are the first to do research on identifying original Hilsa fish. We have collected more than 16,000 images of original and counterfeit Hilsa fish. To classify these images, we have used several deep learning-based models. Then, the performance has been compared between them. Among those models, DenseNet201 achieved the highest accuracy of 97.02%.


Forecasting: theory and practice

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Forecasting has always been at the forefront of decision making and planning. The uncertainty that surrounds the future is both exciting and challenging, with individuals and organisations seeking to minimise risks and maximise utilities. The large number of forecasting applications calls for a diverse set of forecasting methods to tackle real-life challenges. This article provides a non-systematic review of the theory and the practice of forecasting. We provide an overview of a wide range of theoretical, state-of-the-art models, methods, principles, and approaches to prepare, produce, organise, and evaluate forecasts. We then demonstrate how such theoretical concepts are applied in a variety of real-life contexts. We do not claim that this review is an exhaustive list of methods and applications. However, we wish that our encyclopedic presentation will offer a point of reference for the rich work that has been undertaken over the last decades, with some key insights for the future of forecasting theory and practice. Given its encyclopedic nature, the intended mode of reading is non-linear. We offer cross-references to allow the readers to navigate through the various topics. We complement the theoretical concepts and applications covered by large lists of free or open-source software implementations and publicly-available databases.


Challenges of Artificial Intelligence -- From Machine Learning and Computer Vision to Emotional Intelligence

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) has become a part of everyday conversation and our lives. It is considered as the new electricity that is revolutionizing the world. AI is heavily invested in both industry and academy. However, there is also a lot of hype in the current AI debate. AI based on so-called deep learning has achieved impressive results in many problems, but its limits are already visible. AI has been under research since the 1940s, and the industry has seen many ups and downs due to over-expectations and related disappointments that have followed. The purpose of this book is to give a realistic picture of AI, its history, its potential and limitations. We believe that AI is a helper, not a ruler of humans. We begin by describing what AI is and how it has evolved over the decades. After fundamentals, we explain the importance of massive data for the current mainstream of artificial intelligence. The most common representations for AI, methods, and machine learning are covered. In addition, the main application areas are introduced. Computer vision has been central to the development of AI. The book provides a general introduction to computer vision, and includes an exposure to the results and applications of our own research. Emotions are central to human intelligence, but little use has been made in AI. We present the basics of emotional intelligence and our own research on the topic. We discuss super-intelligence that transcends human understanding, explaining why such achievement seems impossible on the basis of present knowledge,and how AI could be improved. Finally, a summary is made of the current state of AI and what to do in the future. In the appendix, we look at the development of AI education, especially from the perspective of contents at our own university.


Deep Learning Interviews: Hundreds of fully solved job interview questions from a wide range of key topics in AI

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The second edition of Deep Learning Interviews is home to hundreds of fully-solved problems, from a wide range of key topics in AI. It is designed to both rehearse interview or exam specific topics and provide machine learning MSc / PhD. students, and those awaiting an interview a well-organized overview of the field. The problems it poses are tough enough to cut your teeth on and to dramatically improve your skills-but they're framed within thought-provoking questions and engaging stories. That is what makes the volume so specifically valuable to students and job seekers: it provides them with the ability to speak confidently and quickly on any relevant topic, to answer technical questions clearly and correctly, and to fully understand the purpose and meaning of interview questions and answers. Those are powerful, indispensable advantages to have when walking into the interview room. The book's contents is a large inventory of numerous topics relevant to DL job interviews and graduate level exams. That places this work at the forefront of the growing trend in science to teach a core set of practical mathematical and computational skills. It is widely accepted that the training of every computer scientist must include the fundamental theorems of ML, and AI appears in the curriculum of nearly every university. This volume is designed as an excellent reference for graduates of such programs.


Towards a Science of Human-AI Decision Making: A Survey of Empirical Studies

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

As AI systems demonstrate increasingly strong predictive performance, their adoption has grown in numerous domains. However, in high-stakes domains such as criminal justice and healthcare, full automation is often not desirable due to safety, ethical, and legal concerns, yet fully manual approaches can be inaccurate and time consuming. As a result, there is growing interest in the research community to augment human decision making with AI assistance. Besides developing AI technologies for this purpose, the emerging field of human-AI decision making must embrace empirical approaches to form a foundational understanding of how humans interact and work with AI to make decisions. To invite and help structure research efforts towards a science of understanding and improving human-AI decision making, we survey recent literature of empirical human-subject studies on this topic. We summarize the study design choices made in over 100 papers in three important aspects: (1) decision tasks, (2) AI models and AI assistance elements, and (3) evaluation metrics. For each aspect, we summarize current trends, discuss gaps in current practices of the field, and make a list of recommendations for future research. Our survey highlights the need to develop common frameworks to account for the design and research spaces of human-AI decision making, so that researchers can make rigorous choices in study design, and the research community can build on each other's work and produce generalizable scientific knowledge. We also hope this survey will serve as a bridge for HCI and AI communities to work together to mutually shape the empirical science and computational technologies for human-AI decision making.


TFDPM: Attack detection for cyber-physical systems with diffusion probabilistic models

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

With the development of AIoT, data-driven attack detection methods for cyber-physical systems (CPSs) have attracted lots of attention. However, existing methods usually adopt tractable distributions to approximate data distributions, which are not suitable for complex systems. Besides, the correlation of the data in different channels does not attract sufficient attention. To address these issues, we use energy-based generative models, which are less restrictive on functional forms of the data distribution. In addition, graph neural networks are used to explicitly model the correlation of the data in different channels. In the end, we propose TFDPM, a general framework for attack detection tasks in CPSs. It simultaneously extracts temporal pattern and feature pattern given the historical data. Then extract features are sent to a conditional diffusion probabilistic model. Predicted values can be obtained with the conditional generative network and attacks are detected based on the difference between predicted values and observed values. In addition, to realize real-time detection, a conditional noise scheduling network is proposed to accelerate the prediction process. Experimental results show that TFDPM outperforms existing state-of-the-art attack detection methods. The noise scheduling network increases the detection speed by three times.