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GPT-3 Creative Fiction

#artificialintelligence

What if I told a story here, how would that story start?" Thus, the summarization prompt: "My second grader asked me what this passage means: …" When a given prompt isn't working and GPT-3 keeps pivoting into other modes of completion, that may mean that one hasn't constrained it enough by imitating a correct output, and one needs to go further; writing the first few words or sentence of the target output may be necessary.


Can robots make food service safer for workers?

Robohub

Health care workers are not the only unwilling essential services frontline workers at increased risk of COVID-19. According to the Washington Post on April 12, "At least 41 grocery workers have died of the coronavirus and thousands more have tested positive in recent weeks". At the same time, grocery stores are seeing a surge in demand and are currently hiring. The food industry is also seeing increasing adoption of robots in both the back end supply chain and in the food retail and food service sectors. "Grocery workers are risking their safety, often for poverty-level wages, so the rest of us can shelter in place," said John Logan, director of labor and employment studies at San Francisco State University. "The only way the rest of us are able to stay home is because they're willing to go to work."


This Week in Business: No More E-Cigarettes at Walmart, and an Attack on the World's Oil Supply

NYT > Economy

Who knew the humble tailpipe could cause so much political rancor? Find out why, below, along with more business and tech news that you should know heading into the week. See, Monday doesn't need to be so bad. When President Trump decided a year ago to roll back Obama-era rules for car pollution, California shrugged, ignored him and kept its stricter regulations. Thirteen other states then followed its lead.


Topic Modeling with Wasserstein Autoencoders

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We propose a novel neural topic model in the Wasserstein autoencoders (WAE) framework. Unlike existing variational autoencoder based models, we directly enforce Dirichlet prior on the latent document-topic vectors. We exploit the structure of the latent space and apply a suitable kernel in minimizing the Maximum Mean Discrepancy (MMD) to perform distribution matching. We discover that MMD performs much better than the Generative Adversarial Network (GAN) in matching high dimensional Dirichlet distribution. We further discover that incorporating randomness in the encoder output during training leads to significantly more coherent topics. To measure the diversity of the produced topics, we propose a simple topic uniqueness metric. Together with the widely used coherence measure NPMI, we offer a more wholistic evaluation of topic quality. Experiments on several real datasets show that our model produces significantly better topics than existing topic models.


Everyone who can now see your entire internet history, including the taxman, DWP and Food Standards Agency

The Independent - Tech

Organisations including the Food Standards Agency and the Department for Work and Pensions will be able to see UK citizens' entire internet browsing history within weeks. The Investigatory Powers Bill, which was all but passed into law this week, forces internet providers to keep a full list of internet connection records (ICRs) for a year and to make them available to the Government if asked. Those ICRs in effect serve as a full list of every website that people have visited, rather than collecting which specific pages are visited or what's done on them. Those include expected law enforcement organisations such as the police, the military and the secret service, but also includes bodies such as the Food Standards Agency, the Gambling Commission, councils and the Welsh Ambulance Services National Health Service Trust. The full list of agencies that can now ask for UK citizens' browsing history, which is laid out in Schedule 4 of the Bill and was collected by Chris Yiu, is below: The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


Irrigation robots could help grow wine grapes in California

Engadget

We all know by now that robots are the future of farming, and things are no different for winemakers in The Golden State. Faced with the shortage of water and workers, they asked researchers from the University of California to create an irrigation system that needs minimal human input. What the team came up with is a system called Robot-Assisted Precision Irrigation Delivery (RAPID) that uses a machine to monitor and adjust water emitters attached to irrigation lines. The researchers have been working to advance and refine the system since 2016, and RAPID is actually the second version of the project. In a new report, IEEE talks about where the researchers are with it, a bit over a year after it received a $1 million grant from the Department of Agriculture.


Pot delivery by drone? California cannabis czars put the kibosh on stoner pipe dream

Los Angeles Times

If you imagined the skies of California would someday be buzzing with drones carrying tiny vials of pot or edibles for recreational marijuana users, think again because that stoner fantasy was just a pipe dream. California's Bureau of Cannabis Control last week outlined its plans to ban pot delivery by drone, putting the kibosh on any business hoping to make a buck on the concept. On Wednesday, the bureau released an initial study describing proposed emergency regulations for commercial cannabis businesses ahead of Jan. 1, when marijuana sales, with proper retail licensing, will be allowed for recreational use in California. In its study -- Commercial Cannabis Business Licensing Program Regulations -- the bureau is clear: Marijuana must be transported in trailers or commercial vehicles. If the message was lost, the bureau goes a bit further: "Transportation may not be done by aircraft, watercraft, rail, drones, human-powered vehicles or unmanned vehicles."


California Inc.: A new era dawns as Whole Foods cuts some prices

Los Angeles Times

Welcome to California Inc., the weekly newsletter of the L.A. Times Business Section. Traders return to business Monday after learning Friday that orders for long-lasting manufactured goods sank 6.8% in July, the biggest fall in nearly three years. Even so, manufacturers have rebounded from a slump in late 2015 and early 2016 caused by cutbacks in the energy industry and a strong dollar. Cheaper food: The impact of Amazon's purchase of Whole Foods Market will reach consumers Monday, when the high-end grocery chain begins cutting prices. Whole Foods will reduce prices on certain "bestselling staples," including bananas, salmon and organic large brown eggs.


California's would-be governor prepares for battle against job-killing robots

The Guardian

The graduating computer science students at UC Berkeley had just finished chuckling at a joke about fleets of "Google buses, Facebook shuttles and Uber-copters" lining up to whisk them them to elite jobs in Silicon Valley. The commencement ceremony for a cohort of students who, one professor confided, were worth around $25bn, was a feel-good affair. Until, that is, Gavin Newsom took to the lectern and burst the bubble. The smooth-talking Democrat, and frontrunner to win California's gubernatorial race next year, warned the students that the "plumbing of the world is radically changing". The tech industry that would make them rich, Newsom declared, was also rendering millions of other people's jobs obsolete and fueling enormous disparities in wealth.


Charles Rosen, 85, Engineer and Winemaker

AITopics Original Links

Charles A. Rosen, an engineer who was an early researcher in robotic and artificial intelligence and a founder of Ridge Vineyards in Cupertino, Calif., died on Dec. 8 at his home in Atherton, Calif. Born in Montreal, Mr. Rosen came to the United States as a teenager. He studied electrical engineering at Cooper Union in New York City and earned a Ph.D. at Syracuse University. During World War II, he returned to Canada to work on Royal Canadian Air Force aircraft being sent to Britain. After the war, he worked on transistor theory at General Electric Research Laboratories in Schenectady, N.Y., and was the coauthor of an early book on the subject.