Government


Autonomous vehicle helped locate 'holy grail of shipwrecks' off Colombia

FOX News

San Jose, which was considered the "holy grail of shipwrecks," was located with the help of an underwater autonomous vehicle An autonomous vehicle was used in 2015 to locate a Spanish galleon that sunk 300 years ago off the coast of Colombia with $17 billion in treasure, the research team that helped in the discovery said on Monday. The San Jose, which was considered the "holy grail of shipwrecks," was located with the help of an underwater autonomous vehicle operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The institution said it was holding the discovery under wraps out of respect for the Colombian government. REMUS 6000 being deployed off the Colombian Navy research ship ARC Malpelo. The treasure--which includes of gold, silver and emeralds-- has been the subject of legal battles between several nations as well as private companies.


Google video reveals creepy concept for collecting vast quantities of user data

FOX News

File photo - A Google carpet is seen at the entrance of the new headquarters of Google France before its official inauguration in Paris, France Dec. 6, 2011. A recently surfaced Google video discusses a creepy concept for collecting vast quantities of user data that could span generations. The video, which was obtained by The Verge, paints an unsettling picture of how data could theoretically be harnessed on an epic scale. The Verge reports that the video was produced in 2016 by X, a research and development subsidiary of Google's parent company Alphabet. X, formerly known as Google X, describes itself as a "moonshot factory" focused on developing technologies to make the world "a radically better place."


Niger drone video shows US forces fighting for their lives

FOX News

WASHINGTON – Dramatic new drone video of the Niger ambush that killed four American soldiers shows U.S. forces desperately trying to escape and fighting for their lives after friendly Nigerien forces mistook them for the enemy. It describes how the fleeing troops set up a quick defensive location on the edge of a swamp and -- thinking they were soon to die -- wrote messages home to their loved ones. The video, released by the Pentagon with explanatory narration, includes more than 10 minutes of drone footage, file tape and animation that wasn't made public last week when the military released a portion of the final report on the October attack. The video depicts for the first time the harrowing hours as troops held off their enemy and waited for rescue. There were 46 U.S. and Nigerien troops out on the initial mission in the west African nation, going after but failing to find a high-value militant, then collecting intelligence at a site where the insurgent had been.


US Army starts work on future attack-recon helicopter

FOX News

The Army is now crafting early requirements for what is expected to be a new attack helicopter -- beyond the Apache -- with superior weapons, speed, maneuverability, sensor technology and vastly-improved close-combat attack capability. "We know that in the future we are going to need to have a lethal capability, which drives us to a future attack reconnaissance platform. The Apache is the world's greatest but there will come a time when we look at leap ahead technology," Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville told a small group of reporters. A future attack-reconnaissance helicopter, now in its conceptual phase, is a key part of a wide-spanning, multi-aircraft Army Future Vertical Lift (FVL) program. FVL seeks a family of next-generation aircraft to begin emerging in the 2030s, consisting of attack, utility and heavy-class air assets.


Google employees resign in protest over controversial Pentagon AI project, report says

FOX News

About a dozen Google employees are resigning in protest over the tech giant's involvement in Project Maven, a controversial military program that uses artificial intelligence, Gizmodo reports. Project Maven, which harnesses AI to improve drone targeting, has been a source of concern for a number of Google employees. Last month, over 3,100 Google workers signed a letter to the company's CEO Sundar Pichai asking him to pull the tech giant out of the project. Announced last year, Project Maven is designed to swiftly pull important data from vast quantities of imagery. The tech news website cites an internal Google document containing written accounts from many of the employees that details their decisions to leave.


Forget about sending humans to Mars -- we need a permanent moon base instead

FOX News

Footage of first interplanetary West Coast launch. NASA's successful launch Saturday of the InSight lander on an exploratory mission to Mars – costing taxpayers about $814 million – is just the latest example of the long fascination people have had with the Red Planet. The lander will study earthquakes – make that marsquakes – to learn more about our neighbor in the solar system. And on Tuesday the three-day Human to Mars Summit kicks off in Washington to discuss the far more ambitious mission of sending men and women to Mars. NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine is one of many NASA officials scheduled to speak, along with officials of companies interested in space exploration, scientists, engineers, people from the entertainment industry and many others.


Hawaii volcano eruption sends lava into residential area, prompting evacuations

FOX News

Hawaii's Kilauea volcano erupted Thursday, May 3, 2018, prompting nearby residents to evacuate from their homes. Nearly 1,500 residents were ordered to evacuate from their volcano-side homes after Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano erupted Thursday, sending red molten lava to chew its way through forest land and bubble up on paved streets. Volcano officials couldn't predict how long the eruption could last, prompting Hawaii's Gov. David Ige to activate the National Guard to help with evacuations and provide security to about 770 structures left empty when residents sought shelter. Drone video from above the lava outbreak in Leilani Estates on Hawaii Island shows roads, homes near the path of destruction. Footage shown on local television showed lava spurting into the sky from a crack in a road.


NASA sets sights on Mars with historic InSight launch

FOX News

NASA is set to make history when it launches its InSight Mars lander on May 5. InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) will be the first spacecraft to launch to another planet from the West Coast when it blasts off from Vandenberg Air Force Base in Central California. The launch at Vandenberg's Space Launch Complex-3 is scheduled for 7:05 a.m. EDT on May 5. A United Launch Alliance Atlas v 401 rocket will send InSight on its 7-month journey to Mars. The unmanned spacecraft, which is built by Lockheed Martin, is expected to land on the Red Planet on Nov. 26, 2018. The mission, which is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, will provide scientists with a wealth of data. "InSight will be the first mission to peer deep beneath the Martian surface, studying the planet's interior by measuring its heat output and listening for marsquakes, which are seismic events similar to earthquakes on Earth," explained NASA, in a statement.


Heat shield for NASA's Mars 2020 rover cracks during test

FOX News

This artist's concept depicts the entry of NASA's Curiosity rover through Mars' upper atmosphere. The Mars 2020 mission will use aspects of this design for its project. The heat shield for NASA's upcoming Mars rover suffered a fracture during testing recently, but the incident won't change the mission's launch date, agency officials said. The Mars 2020 mission is designed to search the Red Planet's surface for signs of ancient microbial life, and the six-wheeled robot will also hunt for and characterize potentially habitable environments. The mission is scheduled to launch in 2020, when Earth and Mars are properly aligned for an interplanetary mission, and arrive at the Red Planet in early 2021.


'Logan's Run,' 'Dam Busters' director Michael Anderson dead at 98

FOX News

Film director Michael Anderson is seen in this undated photo. LONDON – British director Michael Anderson, whose films included war epic "The Dam Busters" and sci-fi classic "Logan's Run," has died at age 98. Anderson's family said Sunday that he died of heart disease April 25 in Canada, at his home on the Sunshine Coast of British Columbia. Born into a theatrical family in London in 1920, Anderson served in the army during World War II and made his feature debut in 1949 with "Private Angelo," co-directed by Peter Ustinov. His 1955 adventure "The Dam Busters" told the story of a daring wartime bombing raid on Germany's industrial heartland. Its visual flair and stirring score helped make it one of Britain's best-loved war films, and its thrilling climax helped inspire the attack on the Death Star in the first "Star Wars" movie.