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Robo-taxis are headed for a street near you

MIT Technology Review

In the coming years, mobility solutions--or how we get from point A to point B--will bridge the gap between ground and air transportation--yes, that means flying cars. Technological advancements are transforming mobility for people and, leading to unprecedented change. Nand Kochhar, vice president of automotive and transportation for Siemens Software says this transformation extends beyond transportation to society in general. "The future of mobility is going to be multimodal to meet consumer demands, to offer a holistic experience in a frictionless way, which offers comfort, convenience, and safety to the end consumer." Thinking about transportation differently is part of a bigger trend, Kochhar notes: "Look at few other trends like sustainability and emissions, which are not just a challenge for the automotive industry but to society as a whole." The advances in technology will have benefits beyond shipping and commute improvements--these technological advancements, Kochhar argues, are poised to drive an infrastructure paradigm shift that will bring newfound autonomy to those who, today, aren't able to get around by themselves. Kochhar explains, "Just imagine people in our own families who are in that stage where they're not able to drive today. Now, you're able to provide them freedom." Laurel Ruma: From Technology Review, I'm Laurel Ruma, and this is Business Lab, the show that helps business leaders make sense of new technologies coming out of the lab and into the marketplace. Our topic today is the future of mobility. In 2011, Marc Andreessen famously said, "Software is eating the world."


Disruptive Innovation 2021: These 15 big ideas are most likely to change the world

ZDNet

ARK Invest defines ''disruptive innovation'' as the introduction of a technologically enabled new product or service that potentially changes the way the world works. ARK focuses solely on offering investment solutions to capture disruptive innovation in the public equity markets. ARK began publishing Big Ideas in 2017. This annual research report seeks to highlight the latest developments in innovation and offers some of our most provocative research conclusions for the year. ARK notes that risks associated with investment in disruptive innovation include: rapid pace of change, exposure across sectors and markets, uncertainty and unknowns, regulatory hurdles, political and legal pressures and competitive landscape.


How Volkswagen's $50 Billion Plan to Beat Tesla Short-Circuited

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The car, however, didn't work as advertised. It could drive, turn corners and stop on a dime. But the fancy technology features VW had promised were either absent or broken. The company's programmers hadn't yet figured out how to update the car's software remotely. Its futuristic head-up display that was supposed to flash speed, directions and other data onto the windshield didn't function.


VW shows its mobile EV charging robot in action

Engadget

It's now clearer how VW's prototype EV charging robot will work in practice. VW has offered its first real-world glimpse of the mobile charger bot in action. It's not just helpful for charging EVs away from dedicated spaces, it's cute -- the prototype has a "face" that lights up as it grabs the battery trailer and plugs into your car. We wouldn't expect to hear the R2-D2-like beeps from the video below, but the robot should otherwise be friendly (or at least, not so creepy) as it tops up your ride. The robot works autonomously and starts up either using an app or through communication with the car itself.


Tesla CEO Elon Musk's next big bet rides on better batteries

The Japan Times

SAN RAMON, California โ€“ Tesla is working on new battery technology that CEO Elon Musk says will enable the company within the next three years to make sleeker, more affordable cars that can travel dramatically longer distances on a single charge. But the battery breakthroughs that Musk unveiled Tuesday at a highly anticipated event didn't impress investors. They were hoping Tesla's technology would mark an even bigger leap forward and propel the company's soaring stock to even greater heights. Tesla's shares shed more than 6 percent in extended trading after Musk's presentation. That deepened a downturn that began during Tuesday's regular trading session as investors began to brace for a potential letdown.


How likely is it that these future technologies will become mainstream

#artificialintelligence

Back in March 1976, a story by Tony Curtis โ€“ no, not that one โ€“ appeared in Wheels. 'In The Year 2025' was a bit of a depressing read, to be honest. Inspired by Orwell's 1984, the author told a tale of all private motor vehicles being banned by the overarching hand of the state by 1985. Swing and a miss there. Yet glance through the 1976 issue and some things are all too familiar.


Week in Review: IoT, Security, Auto

#artificialintelligence

Products/Services Visa agreed to acquire the token and electronic ticketing business of Rambus for $75 million in cash. The business involved is part of the Smart Card Software subsidiary of Rambus. It includes the former Bell ID mobile-payment businesses and the Ecebs smart-ticketing systems for transit providers. Meanwhile, Rambus expanded its CryptoManager Root of Trust product line. "Security is a mission-critical imperative for SoC designs serving virtually every application space," Neeraj Paliwal, vice president of products, cryptography at Rambus, said in a statement.


Tackling Climate Change with Machine Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity, and we, as machine learning experts, may wonder how we can help. Here we describe how machine learning can be a powerful tool in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping society adapt to a changing climate. From smart grids to disaster management, we identify high impact problems where existing gaps can be filled by machine learning, in collaboration with other fields. Our recommendations encompass exciting research questions as well as promising business opportunities. We call on the machine learning community to join the global effort against climate change.


Australian government invests AU$6m in EV charging network

ZDNet

The Australian government has announced a AU$6 million investment in an "ultra-rapid" electric vehicle (EV) charging network powered by renewable energy across the nation under the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA). According to the federal government, the EV charging network will be deployed around Sydney and Melbourne; between Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Brisbane, and Adelaide; and across Western Australia. Euroa, in Victoria, and Barnawartha North, outside Albury Wodonga on the New South Wales-Victorian border, will be the first sites to gain charging areas thanks to a grant from the Victorian government. The AU$15 million EV charging network is being built by Chargefox, with plans to develop 21 charging stations across the nation, each around 200km apart. The charging stations are designed to provide a range of 400km or up to 80 percent capacity within 15 minutes of charging, with the network to be worth AU$15 million.


Graphene tech: What if five minutes were enough to charge your battery?

ZDNet

Video: Samsung to make batteries charge faster and last longer with new 3D graphene. People often credit their ideas to inexplicable eureka moments. Almost two years ago, Rafa Terradas was thinking about developing an innovative bicycle, unlike anything else on the market. At the time, he was also collaborating with the Spanish National Research Council, CSIC, on a project using artificial intelligence and robotics to help autistic children communicate with their environment. There, he met members of the research group from the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2) dedicated to graphene, which is a super-thin material that's stronger than steel, more conductive than copper, and flexible.