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Microsoft releases preview of Lobe training app for machine-learning

ZDNet

Microsoft is continuing to look for ways to make machine-learning technology easier to use. In 2018, Microsoft bought Lobe, a San Francisco-based startup that made a platform for building, training and shipping custom deep-learning models. This week, Microsoft made some of Lobe's technology publicly available. Available for both Windows and Mac, the Lobe app is free and designed to enable people with no data science experience to import images into the app and label them to create a machine learning dataset. According to Microsoft, "Lobe automatically selects the right machine learning architecture and starts training without any setup or configuration."


Reality Engines offers a deep learning tour de force to challenge Amazon et al in Enterprise AI

#artificialintelligence

Bindu Reddy, co-founder and chief executive of startup Reality Engines, unveiled a slew of enterprise apps based on cutting-edge deep learning techniques. "Our moat comes both from constantly innovating and in getting more and more practice on key enterprise use-cases," said Reddy, who was formerly head of "AI verticals" at Amazon's AWS cloud service. Barely a year old, Reality Engines of San Francisco emerged from stealth mode on Tuesday, announcing a slew of artificial intelligence offerings to perform corporate tasks such as budgeting for cloud services or monitoring corporate networks for break-ins. Most exciting of all is that the tiny 18-person team has some very novel takes on deep learning forms of AI, the product of seasoned vets in machine learning technology and products. This is no me-too chatbot service, it would appear.


Reality Engines offers a deep learning tour de force to challenge Amazon et al in Enterprise AI ZDNet

#artificialintelligence

Bindu Reddy, co-founder and chief executive of startup Reality Engines, unveiled a slew of enterprise apps based on cutting-edge deep learning techniques. "Our moat comes both from constantly innovating and in getting more and more practice on key enterprise use-cases," said Reddy, who was formerly head of "AI verticals" at Amazon's AWS cloud service. Barely a year old, Reality Engines of San Francisco emerged from stealth mode on Tuesday, announcing a slew of artificial intelligence offerings to perform corporate tasks such as budgeting for cloud services or monitoring corporate networks for break-ins. Most exciting of all is that the tiny 18-person team has some very novel takes on deep learning forms of AI, the product of seasoned vets in machine learning technology and products. This is no me-too chatbot service, it would appear.


Udacity, Intel invite applications from students for artificial intelligence scholarship program

#artificialintelligence

Udacity, the Silicon Valley based lifelong learning platform, announced its newest initiative to expand students' artificial intelligence skills: the Intel Edge AI Scholarship Program. This new scholarship program, announced at the Intel AI Summit and the Future of Education and Workforce Summit in San Francisco, will empower professional developers interested in advanced learning, specifically deep learning and computer vision, to accelerate the development and deployment of high-performance computer vision and deep learning solutions. Computer vision and AI at the edge are becoming instrumental in powering everything from factory assembly lines and retail inventory management to hospital urgent care medical imaging equipment like X-ray and CAT scans. This program will teach fluency in some of the most cutting-edge technologies. Upon successful completion of the first phase of the program, students will also have the opportunity to earn their way to a full scholarship to the Intel Edge AI for IoT Developers Nanodegree program, a brand-new Udacity Nanodegree program built in partnership with Intel.


Building Brains: How Pearson Plans To Automate Education With AI

#artificialintelligence

On a balmy summer's day in San Francisco, Milena Marinova is sitting on the roof terrace of the offices of Pearson, a company in the midst of a radical transformation from publishing powerhouse to digital-education platform, wrapped in a gray shawl and explaining how she plans to build advanced, deep-learning algorithms that could educate the next generation of students. This is no easy task. With millions of students using its education-software, Pearson has amassed "terrabytes" of data from student homework and even textbooks that have been digitized, data that Marinova is now pulling together to build software that can automatically give students feedback on their work like a teacher would. Instead of just telling them that an answer is right or wrong, a future update to Pearson's math homework tool will give more detailed feedback on how they went wrong in the steps taken to get an answer, Marinova told Forbes in an interview. Pearson is starting with math because the topic is relatively easy to structure and digitize.


Building Brains: How Pearson Plans To Automate Education With AI

#artificialintelligence

On a balmy summer's day in San Francisco, Milena Marinova is sitting on the roof terrace of the offices of Pearson, a company in the midst of a radical transformation from publishing powerhouse to digital-education platform, wrapped in a gray shawl and explaining how she plans to build advanced, deep-learning algorithms that could educate the next generation of students. This is no easy task. With millions of students using its education-software, Pearson has amassed "terrabytes" of data from student homework and even textbooks that have been digitized, data that Marinova is now pulling together to build software that can automatically give students feedback on their work like a teacher would. Instead of just telling them that an answer is right or wrong, a future update to Pearson's math homework tool will give more detailed feedback on how they went wrong in the steps taken to get an answer, Marinova told Forbes in an interview. Pearson is starting with math because the topic is relatively easy to structure and digitize.


San Jose becoming hub for artificial intelligence firms

#artificialintelligence

Cheaper and older isn't typically associated with riches and success in the Bay Area tech scene. But that's just what San Jose is offering -- cheaper office rent and older tech workers -- to a rapidly expanding cohort of companies focused on artificial intelligence, the explosive new frontier in tech. "San Francisco has the gamers, we have the grownups," said San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo. "We've got a very rich pool of talented, skilled workers." Artificial intelligence -- which can be broadly interpreted to include machine learning and the "deep learning" technology that resembles human thought -- is widely seen to be as revolutionary as the internet and mobile phones.


Revolution AI: Why everyone wants in to Montreal's deep-learning hub

#artificialintelligence

All eyes are on Montreal these days as a hub for deep learning. "Clearly it's a place where everybody wants to be if we want to tap into that talent," says Nagraj Kashyap, corporate vice-president of Microsoft Ventures in San Francisco. Montreal's pre-eminence as a deep learning centre can largely be attributed to the efforts of Yoshua Bengio, considered to be one of the three "co-fathers" of deep learning technology. Bengio not only engaged in cutting-edge research at the Université de Montréal long before deep learning was considered viable; his work has spawned an ecosystem that many say is unrivalled in the artificial intelligence (AI) world. That ecosystem includes the Montreal Institute for Learning Algorithms (MILA) which has been funded by government and private sector parties, including Google and Microsoft, among other tech notables.


iPhone, AI and big data: Here's how Apple plans to protect your privacy

ZDNet

Artificial intelligence and big data are white hot technologies but both need to analyse vast amounts of data to work effectively: now Apple is trying to see if it is possible to use both without compromising its tough stance on protecting users' privacy. At the company's World Wide Developers' Conference in San Francisco the company announced a number of initiatives around machine learning and data analytics. Apple said it will use a deep learning technology called long short-term memory (LSTM) to make its Quicktype keyboard able to offer more intelligent options during conversations. For example, automatically offering up information about where you are from in Maps, if the question crops up in a chat with a friend. It is also using deep learning and computer vision to allow the iPhone to provide facial recognition so users can sort pictures of different people into albums.