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@machinelearnbot

Are You an Ecologist or Conservationist Interested in Learning GIS and Machine Learning in R? Then this course is for you! I will take you on an adventure into the amazing of field Machine Learning and GIS for ecological modelling. You will learn how to implement species distribution modelling/map suitable habitats for species in R. My name is MINERVA SINGH and i am an Oxford University MPhil (Geography and Environment) graduate. I finished a PhD at Cambridge University (Tropical Ecology and Conservation). I have several years of experience in analyzing real life spatial data from different sources and producing publications for international peer reviewed journals.


Learn AI - Artificial Intelligence Course Udacity

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology is increasingly prevalent in our everyday lives. It has uses in a variety of industries from gaming, journalism/media, to finance, as well as in the state-of-the-art research fields from robotics, medical diagnosis, and quantum science. In this course you'll learn the basics and applications of AI, including: machine learning, probabilistic reasoning, robotics, computer vision, and natural language processing.


Learn how to build Raspberry Pi computers with this $15 online class

Mashable

Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission. A partnership between Broadcom and the University of Cambridge, the U.K. based Raspberry Pi Foundation creates credit card-sized computers that promote learning how to code and educational research. Since the computers went on the market in 2012, Raspberry Pi has sold over eight million models and is the United Kingdom's best-selling computer. Setting up a Raspberry Pi is easy. Simply plug in a monitor, mouse, and keyboard, and install the computer.




Online Learning of Power Transmission Dynamics

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We consider the problem of reconstructing the dynamic state matrix of transmission power grids from time-stamped PMU measurements in the regime of ambient fluctuations. Using a maximum likelihood based approach, we construct a family of convex estimators that adapt to the structure of the problem depending on the available prior information. The proposed method is fully data-driven and does not assume any knowledge of system parameters. It can be implemented in near real-time and requires a small amount of data. Our learning algorithms can be used for model validation and calibration, and can also be applied to related problems of system stability, detection of forced oscillations, generation re-dispatch, as well as to the estimation of the system state.


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Mashable

Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission. It's time to give that ol' brain of yours a thorough dusting-off, so to speak: Through the Full Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) Diploma Course, you might be able to hack your way to an improved way of thinking. NLP, in case you haven't heard, is a set of rules and techniques designed to help you shape your personal psychology and achieve self-actualization. Some see it as pseudo-science, while others swear by it. Either way, the idea is that you can train your brain to eliminate phobias, tweak bad habits, and even gain a deeper understanding of others' body language -- skills that are beneficial in the workplace, your social life, and beyond.


Decentralized Online Learning with Kernels

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We consider multi-agent stochastic optimization problems over reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHS). In this setting, a network of interconnected agents aims to learn decision functions, i.e., nonlinear statistical models, that are optimal in terms of a global convex functional that aggregates data across the network, with only access to locally and sequentially observed samples. We propose solving this problem by allowing each agent to learn a local regression function while enforcing consensus constraints. We use a penalized variant of functional stochastic gradient descent operating simultaneously with low-dimensional subspace projections. These subspaces are constructed greedily by applying orthogonal matching pursuit to the sequence of kernel dictionaries and weights. By tuning the projection-induced bias, we propose an algorithm that allows for each individual agent to learn, based upon its locally observed data stream and message passing with its neighbors only, a regression function that is close to the globally optimal regression function. That is, we establish that with constant step-size selections agents' functions converge to a neighborhood of the globally optimal one while satisfying the consensus constraints as the penalty parameter is increased. Moreover, the complexity of the learned regression functions is guaranteed to remain finite. On both multi-class kernel logistic regression and multi-class kernel support vector classification with data generated from class-dependent Gaussian mixture models, we observe stable function estimation and state of the art performance for distributed online multi-class classification. Experiments on the Brodatz textures further substantiate the empirical validity of this approach.


Strategyproof Peer Selection using Randomization, Partitioning, and Apportionment

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Peer review, evaluation, and selection is a fundamental aspect of modern science. Funding bodies the world over employ experts to review and select the best proposals of those submitted for funding. The problem of peer selection, however, is much more general: a professional society may want to give a subset of its members awards based on the opinions of all members; an instructor for a MOOC or online course may want to crowdsource grading; or a marketing company may select ideas from group brainstorming sessions based on peer evaluation. We make three fundamental contributions to the study of procedures or mechanisms for peer selection, a specific type of group decision-making problem, studied in computer science, economics, and political science. First, we propose a novel mechanism that is strategyproof, i.e., agents cannot benefit by reporting insincere valuations. Second, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our mechanism by a comprehensive simulation-based comparison with a suite of mechanisms found in the literature. Finally, our mechanism employs a randomized rounding technique that is of independent interest, as it solves the apportionment problem that arises in various settings where discrete resources such as parliamentary representation slots need to be divided proportionally.