Language Learning


Arduino powered and 3D printed, this robot translates to sign language

ZDNet

Sign language translators are scarce. Three engineering students from the University of Antwerp have novel solution: Cheap 3D printed humanoids that can translate to sign language on the fly. It's a solution that's only become possible with the converge of 3D printing, the massive popularity of microcontrollers like the Arduino Due, and falling prices for robotics components. ASLAN is an abbreviation which stands for: "Antwerp's Sign Language Actuating Node."


This 3D-printed robotic arm is built for sign language

#artificialintelligence

Or -- and this one is real -- a robot arm that can perform rudimentary sign language. Their solution is "Antwerp's Sign Language Actuating Node," or ASLAN. It's a robotic hand and forearm that can perform sign language letters and numbers. It also could be used to help teach sign language -- a robot doesn't get tired of repeating a gesture for you to learn.


Sign language turned to text with new electric glove

Daily Mail

An electric glove which can convert sign language into text messages has been unveiled by scientists. The device consists of a sports glove which has been fitted with nine stretchable sensors positioned over the knuckles. When a user bends their fingers or thumb to sign a letter, the sensors stretch, which causes an electrical signal to be produced. When a user bends their fingers or thumb to sign a letter, the sensors stretch, which causes an electrical signal to be produced.


Glove turns sign language into text for real-time translation

New Scientist

A new glove developed at the University of California, San Diego, can convert the 26 letters of American Sign Language (ASL) into text on a smartphone or computer screen. "For thousands of people in the UK, sign language is their first language," says Jesal Vishnuram, the technology research manager at the charity Action on Hearing Loss. In the UK, someone who is deaf is entitled to a sign language translator at work or when visiting a hospital, but at a train station, for example, it can be incredibly difficult to communicate with people who don't sign. The flexible sensors mean that you hardly notice that you are wearing the glove, says Timothy O'Connor who is working on the technology at the University of California, San Diego.


Automatic sign language translators turn signing into text

New Scientist

Machine translation systems that convert sign language into text and back again are helping people who are deaf or have difficulty hearing to communicate with those who cannot sign. A sign language user can approach a bank teller and sign to the KinTrans camera that they'd like assistance, for example. KinTrans's machine learning algorithm translates each sign as it is made and then a separate algorithm turns those signs into a sentence that makes grammatical sense. KinTrans founder Mohamed Elwazer says his system can already recognise thousands of signs in both American and Arabic sign language with 98 per cent accuracy.


GIFs can teach sign language

Daily Mail

Aside from adding a funny spin to a message, GIFs can now teach you sign language. Giphy recently released a GIF library of more than 2,000 words and phrases in American Sign Language. The GIF's are based on the video series Sign with Robert with Robert DeMayo, who has been deaf since he was born. Aside from adding a funny spin to a message, GIFs can now teach you sign language. Giphy recently released a GIF library of more than 2,000 words and phrases in American Sign Language.


Giphy launches library of more than 2,000 GIFs to teach you sign language

Mashable

To create the GIFs, Giphy cut videos from the popular educational series Sign With Robert, adding text descriptions to make the GIFs look like looping flash cards. "The looping format makes it a perfect tool for learning through repetition." The team at Giphy worked to cut down these existing videos into individual words and phrases to create the expansive collection of GIFs. Though Giphy plans to continue growing the library of GIFs, the team chose to include words and phrases by looking at Giphy users' top search terms.


IBM Research Demonstrates Innovative 'Speech to Sign Language' Translation System

AITopics Original Links

HURSLEY, UK--(Marketwire - September 13, 2007) - IBM (NYSE: IBM) has developed an ingenious system called SiSi (Say It Sign It) that automatically converts the spoken word into British Sign Language (BSL) which is then signed by an animated digital character or avatar. SiSi brings together a number of computer technologies. A speech recognition module converts the spoken word into text, which SiSi then interprets into gestures, that are used to animate an avatar which signs in BSL. Upon development this system would see a signing avatar'pop up' in the corner of the display screen in use -- whether that be a laptop, personal computer, TV, meeting-room display or auditorium screen. Users would be able select the size and appearance of the avatar.


Kinect sensor can translate sign language into SPEECH and TEXT

AITopics Original Links

Microsoft's Kinect has already proved its credentials in reading simple hand and body movements in the gaming world. But now a team of Chinese researchers have added sign language to its motion-sensing capabilities. Scientists at Microsoft Research Asia recently demonstrated software that allows Kinect to read sign language using hand tracking. What's impressive is that it can do this in real-time, translating sign language to spoken language and vice versa at conversational speeds. The system, dubbed the Kinect Sign Language Translator, is capable of capturing a conversation from both sides.


Toshiba's new robot can speak in sign language

AITopics Original Links

The "communication android", as Toshiba is calling its creation, was unveiled this week at the Cutting-Edge IT & Electronics Comprehensive Exhibition (CEATEC), Japan, and has been designed for a maximum of movement fluidity in its hands and arms, employing 43 actuators in its joints, in order to speak in Japanese sign language. At this point, its range is fairly limited: it can mimic simple movements, such as greetings, but the company has plans to develop the robot -- named Aiko Chihira -- into a full communications robot by 2020. This will include speech synthesis, speech recognition, robotic control and other sensors. The end goal, the company said, is a robot that can serve as a "companion for the elderly and people with dementia, to offer telecounseling in natural speech, communicate through sign language and allow healthcare workers or family members to keep an eye on elderly people." If the robot looks familiar, that's because it was developed in collaboration with Osaka University, which has been developing humanoid robots for some time.