Language Learning


GIFs can teach sign language

Daily Mail

Aside from adding a funny spin to a message, GIFs can now teach you sign language. Giphy recently released a GIF library of more than 2,000 words and phrases in American Sign Language. The GIF's are based on the video series Sign with Robert with Robert DeMayo, who has been deaf since he was born. Aside from adding a funny spin to a message, GIFs can now teach you sign language. Giphy recently released a GIF library of more than 2,000 words and phrases in American Sign Language.


Giphy launches library of more than 2,000 GIFs to teach you sign language

Mashable

GIFs can do more than add a sassy quip to the end of your tweet. Now, they can even help you learn a new language. Giphy released an extensive GIF library on Thursday with more than 2,000 words and phrases in American Sign Language. To create the GIFs, Giphy cut videos from the popular educational series Sign With Robert, adding text descriptions to make the GIFs look like looping flash cards. At first glance, the GIFs might seem a bit unremarkable -- they simply show Sign with Robert creator Robert DeMayo, who has been deaf since birth, signing a word over and over.


ASL-STEM Forum: A Bottom-Up Approach to Enabling American Sign Language to Grow in STEM Fields

AAAI Conferences

Deaf and hard of hearing students studying advanced topics in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) lack standard terminology to enable them to learn, discuss and contribute to their chosen fields. The ASL-STEM Forum enables the diverse, thinly-spread groups that are independently creating and using terminology to come together using a community-based, video-enabled web resource. A common vocabulary would provide interpreters with consistent terminology and enable deaf scientists to more easily converse from a common basis. This paper discusses the implementation of the ASL-STEM Forum, describes our approach to building a community using the site, and overviews the unique opportunities it offers for observing a language developing from the bottom-up.