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Artificial Intelligence (AI) Stocks - What They Are & Why You Should Invest

#artificialintelligence

There are few sectors of the stock market that are quite as exciting as the artificial intelligence sector. Eerily reminiscent of many works of science fiction, today's technological innovation has brought us smartphones, televisions, and even homes that talk to you, providing intelligent answers in seemingly no time flat! AI technology is quickly changing the way people do everything from order food to enjoy streaming entertainment, and as adoption of the technology continues, the opportunities in the space are only growing larger. It's no surprise to find intense investor interest in artificial intelligence stocks, but what exactly are the companies they represent doing, and should you be investing in them? Read on to learn more about this fast-evolving sector of the economy and how to go about investing in it.


Cyberphysical Sequencing for Distributed Asset Management with Broad Traceability

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Cyber-Physical systems (CPS) have complex lifecycles involving multiple stakeholders, and the transparency of both hardware and software components' supply chain is opaque at best. This raises concerns for stakeholders who may not trust that what they receive is what was requested. There is an opportunity to build a cyberphysical titling process offering universal traceability and the ability to differentiate systems based on provenance. Today, RFID tags and barcodes address some of these needs, though they are easily manipulated due to non-linkage with an object or system's intrinsic characteristics. We propose cyberphysical sequencing as a low-cost, light-weight and pervasive means of adding track-and-trace capabilities to any asset that ties a system's physical identity to a unique and invariant digital identifier. CPS sequencing offers benefits similar Digital Twins' for identifying and managing the provenance and identity of an asset throughout its life with far fewer computational and other resources. Across domains, manufactured and assembled system complexity is increasing. Constituent components require compliance with stringent specifications, must have low defect rates, and increasingly require known provenance relating to origin and interaction histories. At the same time, economic and other constraints affecting production and assembly may necessitate involving diverse and untrusted vendors: a vehicle's parts may be made abroad and assembled domestically, while a medication might be compounded in one country before being shipped to another for packaging and a third for distribution. Power generation plant components might be manufactured globally but require certification in the country of use, while electronics manufacturing for a globally-distributed device may require trust-related integrated circuits to be provided and validated by a single-source vendor.


The Role of Social Movements, Coalitions, and Workers in Resisting Harmful Artificial Intelligence and Contributing to the Development of Responsible AI

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

There is mounting public concern over the influence that AI based systems has in our society. Coalitions in all sectors are acting worldwide to resist hamful applications of AI. From indigenous people addressing the lack of reliable data, to smart city stakeholders, to students protesting the academic relationships with sex trafficker and MIT donor Jeffery Epstein, the questionable ethics and values of those heavily investing in and profiting from AI are under global scrutiny. There are biased, wrongful, and disturbing assumptions embedded in AI algorithms that could get locked in without intervention. Our best human judgment is needed to contain AI's harmful impact. Perhaps one of the greatest contributions of AI will be to make us ultimately understand how important human wisdom truly is in life on earth.


The 20 technologies that defined the first 20 years of the 21st Century

The Independent - Tech

The early 2000s were not a good time for technology. After entering the new millennium amid the impotent panic of the Y2K bug, it wasn't long before the Dotcom Bubble was bursting all the hopes of a new internet-based era. Fortunately the recovery was swift and within a few years brand new technologies were emerging that would transform culture, politics and the economy. They have brought with them new ways of connecting, consuming and getting around, while also raising fresh Doomsday concerns. As we enter a new decade of the 21st Century, we've rounded up the best and worst of the technologies that have taken us here, while offering some clue of where we might be going. There was nothing much really new about the iPhone: there had been phones before, there had been computers before, there had been phones combined into computers before. There was also a lot that wasn't good about it: it was slow, its internet connection barely functioned, and it would be two years before it could even take a video.


The 84 biggest flops, fails, and dead dreams of the decade in tech

#artificialintelligence

The world never changes quite the way you expect. But at The Verge, we've had a front-row seat while technology has permeated every aspect of our lives over the past decade. Some of the resulting moments -- and gadgets -- arguably defined the decade and the world we live in now. But others we ate up with popcorn in hand, marveling at just how incredibly hard they flopped. This is the decade we learned that crowdfunded gadgets can be utter disasters, even if they don't outright steal your hard-earned cash. It's the decade of wearables, tablets, drones and burning batteries, and of ridiculous valuations for companies that were really good at hiding how little they actually had to offer. Here are 84 things that died hard, often hilariously, to bring us where we are today. Everyone was confused by Google's Nexus Q when it debuted in 2012, including The Verge -- which is probably why the bowling ball of a media streamer crashed and burned before it even came to market.


The best dash cam

Engadget

This post was done in partnership with Wirecutter. When readers choose to buy Wirecutter's independently chosen editorial picks, Wirecutter and Engadget may earn affiliate commission. After researching about 200 dash cams and testing 30, we've found that the Garmin Dash Cam 55 is the dash cam we'd want on the windshield in case something crazy happens when we're out for a drive. This camera produces crisp, detailed video day or night, and its compact body sits securely in a magnetic mount that's among the simplest to set up and use daily. The Garmin Dash Cam 55 records at a 1440p resolution, delivering better-quality video than most of the models we've tested, with sharp enough resolution to clearly read license plates and see other details in lighting conditions that other cameras struggled with. At only 2¼ by 1½ inches, the Garmin takes up less room on the windshield than most, and its small magnetic mount makes the camera easy to adjust, attach, or remove. You can perform basic functions through voice commands--a rare feature that helps make up for some awkward physical controls. It also has details common to higher-end units, like an integrated GPS receiver, Wi-Fi for connecting to a compatible smartphone app, and some handy driver assistance functions. On performance, the Nextbase 512GW and Nextbase 612GW 4K are actually better dash cams than the Garmin 55--but this brand, popular in the UK and new to the US market, has been available inconsistently so far. If you can find either of these Nextbase models, you'll get the best image quality--as well as one of the best mounts and smartphone apps--of any dash cams we tested. A few details differentiate this pair: the 512GW records at 1440p resolution, has touch-sensitive buttons, and a plastic body; the 612GW records at a crisper 2160p (4K) and has both an easier-to-use touchscreen and a sturdier aluminum body. You can also connect an optional rear camera to the 512GW.


China's AI Industry Has Given Birth To 14 Unicorns: Is It A Bubble Waiting To Burst?

#artificialintelligence

A staff member displays a DJI Phantom 3 4K drone during CES (Consumer Electronics Show) in Las Vegas, Nevada. It may come as a surprising fact that there are now 14 Chinese AI companies valued at $1 billion or more. These unicorns are worth a combined $40.5 billion, according to a report China Money Network recently released during the World Economic Forum's Summer Davos gathering in Beijing. Just to put these numbers in perspective. Google bought DeepMind for over $500 million in 2014. Chinese voice recognition giant iFlytek Co. has a market capitalization of 63 billion yuan ($9.2 billion). Chinese AI startups raised $27.7 billion via 369 VC deals in 2017, according to a recent report from Tsinghua University. So naturally, it raises questions on if there is a bubble waiting to pop in the Chinese AI space. How could these companies, with an average age of less than five years, be worth so much money?


Tesla shares plunge after Elon Musk smokes joint on Joe Rogan podcast

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Tesla shares have plunged this morning after Elon Musk smoked marijuana and drank whiskey while discussing everything from drugs to the possibility we're all living in a simulation, in a rambling two-and-a-half hour podcast appearance which was live-streamed on YouTube. The 47-year-old billionaire went on the Joe Rogan Experience late on Thursday night and accepted a joint from the host - after a rambling conversation that also took in the dangers of AI and the possibility China is spying on US citizens through their phones. Hours later, the company's chief accounting officer Dave Morton resigned citing'public attention' on the company. Meanwhile, shares plummeted to nine per cent this morning, wiping $4.3 billion off the company's value. By close of trading they had slightly recovered to a 6.3 per cent drop, reducing the company's value by $3.1bn. It follows weeks of serious turbulence for both Musk and Tesla, after he falsely announced he was taking the company private in a deal with Saudi Arabia and accused a British hero diver of being a paedophile.


Dual-screen Finney phone is 'world's first blockchain smartphone' – and it wants to bring cryptocurrency to the masses

The Independent - Tech

An Israeli startup behind one of the world's most expensive phones has unveiled its latest device, which it hopes will simultaneously revolutionise smartphones and deliver cryptocurrency to the masses. In contrast to its predecessor, the new device aims to reach as wide an audience as possible with a more modest price tag of $1,000. It is unique both in terms of its software and hardware, having ditched the monolithic slab design adopted by most modern-day smartphone manufacturers. A twist to this ubiquitous design means the introduction of a hidden screen that slides up from behind the Finney's main display to reveal a cold-storage cryptocurrency wallet. "We're blockchain enthusiasts," Nimrod May, Sirin Labs' chief marketing officer, tells The Independent.