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The 20 technologies that defined the first 20 years of the 21st Century

The Independent - Tech

The early 2000s were not a good time for technology. After entering the new millennium amid the impotent panic of the Y2K bug, it wasn't long before the Dotcom Bubble was bursting all the hopes of a new internet-based era. Fortunately the recovery was swift and within a few years brand new technologies were emerging that would transform culture, politics and the economy. They have brought with them new ways of connecting, consuming and getting around, while also raising fresh Doomsday concerns. As we enter a new decade of the 21st Century, we've rounded up the best and worst of the technologies that have taken us here, while offering some clue of where we might be going. There was nothing much really new about the iPhone: there had been phones before, there had been computers before, there had been phones combined into computers before. There was also a lot that wasn't good about it: it was slow, its internet connection barely functioned, and it would be two years before it could even take a video.


The 84 biggest flops, fails, and dead dreams of the decade in tech

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The world never changes quite the way you expect. But at The Verge, we've had a front-row seat while technology has permeated every aspect of our lives over the past decade. Some of the resulting moments -- and gadgets -- arguably defined the decade and the world we live in now. But others we ate up with popcorn in hand, marveling at just how incredibly hard they flopped. This is the decade we learned that crowdfunded gadgets can be utter disasters, even if they don't outright steal your hard-earned cash. It's the decade of wearables, tablets, drones and burning batteries, and of ridiculous valuations for companies that were really good at hiding how little they actually had to offer. Here are 84 things that died hard, often hilariously, to bring us where we are today. Everyone was confused by Google's Nexus Q when it debuted in 2012, including The Verge -- which is probably why the bowling ball of a media streamer crashed and burned before it even came to market.



5G, VR, AI, blockchain: What to watch out for at Mobile World Congress

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By Stefan Nicola and Joe Mayes Mobile World Congress, the wireless industry's biggest conference, begins next week in Barcelona, where more than 100,000 people are set to see the latest smartphones, artificial intelligence devices and autonomous drones exhibited by roughly 2,300 companies. The event is also the industry's largest networking opportunity for executives, bankers, analysts and the like to talk shop -- and potential deals. Here are the big themes likely to dominate the event: Samsung to Sony in device battle MWC has long been a venue for companies to show off their latest mobile devices and vie for consumer attention. This year, Samsung is back to unveil its latest flagship phone, widely expected to be the Galaxy S9. Sony created buzz when it posted a video on Twitter last Sunday for what looks like it could be a new Xperia device with curves, and gadget blogs such as Wired have speculated whether foldable phones will make their debut this year.


The $1tn question: how far can the new iPhone 8 take Apple?

The Guardian

Apple's stock market value is heading towards a new milestone and its latest product launch on 12 September could push the tech giant closer to becoming the first ever $1tn (£760bn) company. At the end of last week, the company's market capitalisation hovered around $830bn, continuing a 10-year run that has generally headed upwards since a low of $69bn in January 2009, during the financial crisis. Tuesday's event, with the iPhone 8 the star attraction, will strive to meet investors' – and customers' – vaulting expectations. But what will Apple tempt users with to justify Wall Street's faith in its future profits? An Apple spokesman declined to discuss what will be revealed at the event in the company's $5bn, spaceship-shaped Cupertino headquarters.


China Internet Report 2017 by Edith Yeung

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China Internet Trends 2017 Edith Yeung August 2017 2. Selected by Inc's Magazine as one of the Silicon Valley's investors you must know, Edith Yeung is the head of 500 Startups Greater China and partner of 500 Mobile Collective Fund. Edith invested in over 40 mobile, VR, AR, AI and machine learning startups, including Hooked - #1 reading app for millennium, DayDayCook - #1 Asian Cooking media and platform, Fleksy (acquired by Pinterest), Human (acquired by Mapbox), AISense, and many more. Before 500, Edith was the head of marketing for Dolphin Browser, a Sequoia- backed mobile browser with over 150 million installs worldwide. Edith also worked with many Fortune 500 companies such as Siebel, AMS, AT&T Wireless and Autodesk. There are so many Chinese people...


Investorideas.com - Artificial Intelligence Stocks, The Opportunity and Market; (NASDAQ: $EA), ($GOOGL), (OTCQB: $GOPH), ($FB), ($IBM)

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For investors trying to understand the opportunity and the size of the market, a report from Statista says that, "In 2017, the global AI market is expected to be worth approximately 1.25 billion U.S. dollars. Some current major uses of artificial intelligence include image recognition, object identification, detection and classification, as well as automated geophysical feature detection. The largest proportion of revenues come from the AI for enterprise applications market." Featured Company: Gopher Protocol, Inc. (OTCQB: GOPH) is a development-stage company developing Internet of Things (IoT) and Artificial Intelligence enabled mobile technology. The Company has a portfolio of Intellectual Property that when commercialized will include smart microchips, mobile application software and supporting cloud software.


How to Make Real Money From Virtual Things

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Just a decade ago, few would have guessed that virtual goods could create a real market. Then the smartphone age sparked a whole new universe of ephemeral, yet lucrative, commerce. "People have gotten much more comfortable with the idea of paying for things that are virtual," says Joost van Dreunen, the co-founder and CEO of SuperData, a gaming research firm. For startups in this fast-growing market, the goods may be fake, but the sales are real. Some of the most promising new areas of business are hidden behind what can sound like Millennial smartphone-speak: Kimoji!


The Rise of Asian Platforms: A Regional Survey

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As in the global survey, we are concerned with platform business models and the design choices that allow these business models to grow. We find the term platform, which is well-established in economic and management literature, offers a more useful and accurate term than some of the terms that have been used such as "share economy companies," "internet companies" or, even more broadly, "tech companies." Network effects are a key characteristic that distinguish platforms from other business models. As more users engage with a platform, the more attractive the platform becomes to potential new users. When more users attract more users, a dynamic is created that in turn triggers a self-reinforcing cycle of growth.


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