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InsurTech_2022-01-14_04-55-46.xlsx

#artificialintelligence

The graph represents a network of 1,546 Twitter users whose tweets in the requested range contained "InsurTech", or who were replied to or mentioned in those tweets. The network was obtained from the NodeXL Graph Server on Friday, 14 January 2022 at 13:08 UTC. The requested start date was Friday, 14 January 2022 at 01:01 UTC and the maximum number of tweets (going backward in time) was 7,500. The tweets in the network were tweeted over the 2-day, 4-hour, 44-minute period from Tuesday, 11 January 2022 at 20:16 UTC to Friday, 14 January 2022 at 01:00 UTC. Additional tweets that were mentioned in this data set were also collected from prior time periods.


InsurTech_2021-12-24_04-55-46.xlsx

#artificialintelligence

The graph represents a network of 1,552 Twitter users whose tweets in the requested range contained "InsurTech", or who were replied to or mentioned in those tweets. The network was obtained from the NodeXL Graph Server on Friday, 24 December 2021 at 13:11 UTC. The requested start date was Friday, 24 December 2021 at 01:01 UTC and the maximum number of tweets (going backward in time) was 7,500. The tweets in the network were tweeted over the 6-day, 7-hour, 49-minute period from Friday, 17 December 2021 at 17:10 UTC to Friday, 24 December 2021 at 01:00 UTC. Additional tweets that were mentioned in this data set were also collected from prior time periods.


Why the internet of things could destroy the welfare state

AITopics Original Links

On 24 August 1965 Gloria Placente, a 34-year-old resident of Queens, New York, was driving to Orchard Beach in the Bronx. Clad in shorts and sunglasses, the housewife was looking forward to quiet time at the beach. But the moment she crossed the Willis Avenue bridge in her Chevrolet Corvair, Placente was surrounded by a dozen patrolmen. There were also 125 reporters, eager to witness the launch of New York police department's Operation Corral โ€“ an acronym for Computer Oriented Retrieval of Auto Larcenists. Fifteen months earlier, Placente had driven through a red light and neglected to answer the summons, an offence that Corral was going to punish with a heavy dose of techno-Kafkaesque. It worked as follows: a police car stationed at one end of the bridge radioed the licence plates of oncoming cars to a teletypist miles away, who fed them to a Univac 490 computer, an expensive $500,000 toy ($3.5m in today's dollars) on loan from the Sperry Rand Corporation. The computer checked the numbers against a database of 110,000 cars that were either stolen or belonged to known offenders. In case of a match the teletypist would alert a second patrol car at the bridge's other exit. It took, on average, just seven seconds. Compared with the impressive police gear of today โ€“ automatic number plate recognition, CCTV cameras, GPS trackers โ€“ Operation Corral looks quaint.