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State of AI Ethics Report (Volume 6, February 2022)

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This report from the Montreal AI Ethics Institute (MAIEI) covers the most salient progress in research and reporting over the second half of 2021 in the field of AI ethics. Particular emphasis is placed on an "Analysis of the AI Ecosystem", "Privacy", "Bias", "Social Media and Problematic Information", "AI Design and Governance", "Laws and Regulations", "Trends", and other areas covered in the "Outside the Boxes" section. The two AI spotlights feature application pieces on "Constructing and Deconstructing Gender with AI-Generated Art" as well as "Will an Artificial Intellichef be Cooking Your Next Meal at a Michelin Star Restaurant?". Given MAIEI's mission to democratize AI, submissions from external collaborators have featured, such as pieces on the "Challenges of AI Development in Vietnam: Funding, Talent and Ethics" and using "Representation and Imagination for Preventing AI Harms". The report is a comprehensive overview of what the key issues in the field of AI ethics were in 2021, what trends are emergent, what gaps exist, and a peek into what to expect from the field of AI ethics in 2022. It is a resource for researchers and practitioners alike in the field to set their research and development agendas to make contributions to the field of AI ethics.


Do You think AI has Risk Factors? Know these 5 Downsides

#artificialintelligence

The role of AI has modified considerably – from its preliminary creation on the threshold of an enterprise of their innovation labs, to the modern-day while human beings are starting to recognize that it has the ability to convert businesses from the center out. Recently there's been a warning approximately extending its use past simple functionality, and what sort of it could be trusted, which has supposed its use hasn't been pervasive inside businesses. However, now that an increasing number of businesses have dipped their toe into the water and have had their eyes opened as to the advantages it may provide, the technology is ultimately prepared to attain maturity. A key cause for this is to stop customers from also are attaining adulthood in their personal expertise approximately each how they are able to get the fine outcomes from AI, and additionally the rights and wrongs of the usage of it. Now that AI has been in large part demystified, customers have much higher expertise of a way to practice it successfully and correctly, because of this that they're subsequently prepared to undertake it on a much broader foundation and ship its use into the mainstream.


The State of AI Ethics Report (Volume 5)

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This report from the Montreal AI Ethics Institute covers the most salient progress in research and reporting over the second quarter of 2021 in the field of AI ethics with a special emphasis on "Environment and AI", "Creativity and AI", and "Geopolitics and AI." The report also features an exclusive piece titled "Critical Race Quantum Computer" that applies ideas from quantum physics to explain the complexities of human characteristics and how they can and should shape our interactions with each other. The report also features special contributions on the subject of pedagogy in AI ethics, sociology and AI ethics, and organizational challenges to implementing AI ethics in practice. Given MAIEI's mission to highlight scholars from around the world working on AI ethics issues, the report also features two spotlights sharing the work of scholars operating in Singapore and Mexico helping to shape policy measures as they relate to the responsible use of technology. The report also has an extensive section covering the gamut of issues when it comes to the societal impacts of AI covering areas of bias, privacy, transparency, accountability, fairness, interpretability, disinformation, policymaking, law, regulations, and moral philosophy.


Interview: Marc Andreessen, VC and tech pioneer

#artificialintelligence

Marc Andreessen should need no introduction, but I'll do one anyway. He helped code the first widely used graphical web browser, Mosaic, which as I see it makes him one of the inventors of the internet. He co-founded Netscape and various other companies. He also co-founded the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz (with Ben Horowitz), also known as A16Z, one of the country's largest VC firms. Recently he has launched a media publication called Future, where he occasionally writes his thoughts. Marc has been a sort of hero of mine ever since I was a teenager, when Netscape Navigator felt like it opened up the world. I came out to California in part to meet people like him. Now we know each other well, and he's a subscriber to my blog! The thing I always like about talking to Marc is how he combines relentless optimism with the concrete knowledge to back up that optimism -- both knowledge of specific details and a broad understanding of various schools of thought. Lots of people will tell you the future holds amazing possibilities; Marc will tell you exactly what those possibilities are, and why they're possible.


Breaking through the hype: The real-world benefits of 5G connectivity

#artificialintelligence

In this episode of the McKinsey Podcast, Diane Brady speaks with partners Michael Chui and Enno de Boer about the fifth generation of wireless technologies and how artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, and other advanced technologies are reshaping businesses. An edited transcript of their conversation follows. Today we're talking about the fuel that is powering the Fourth Industrial Revolution. It is, of course, the much anticipated 5G, or fifth-generation wireless technology. What it delivers is an astonishing level of connectivity that will transform every industry. Today we're focusing on the impact it's already having on manufacturing, from the supply chain to how we run our factories, and, more importantly, that there are many times where we don't actually need 5G to get this done. Joining me today are two McKinsey leaders who spend a lot of time on the front lines of transformative technologies. Michael Chui is a San Francisco–based partner at the McKinsey Global Institute, where he leads research on the impact of technology on business and society. Enno de Boer is the global head of manufacturing out of New York, where he's worked with partners like the World Economic Forum on the future of production and the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Enno de Boer: It's great to be here. Diane Brady: You are both on the front lines.


Risk & returns around FOMC press conferences: a novel perspective from computer vision

arXiv.org Machine Learning

I propose a new tool to characterize the resolution of uncertainty around FOMC press conferences. It relies on the construction of a measure capturing the level of discussion complexity between the Fed Chair and reporters during the Q&A sessions. I show that complex discussions are associated with higher equity returns and a drop in realized volatility. The method creates an attention score by quantifying how much the Chair needs to rely on reading internal documents to be able to answer a question. This is accomplished by building a novel dataset of video images of the press conferences and leveraging recent deep learning algorithms from computer vision. This alternative data provides new information on nonverbal communication that cannot be extracted from the widely analyzed FOMC transcripts. This paper can be seen as a proof of concept that certain videos contain valuable information for the study of financial markets.


Tech and Ethics: The World Economic Forum's Kay Firth-Butterfield on Doing the Right Thing in AI

#artificialintelligence

Kay Firth-Butterfield was teaching AI, ethics, law, and international relations when a chance meeting on an airplane landed her a job as chief AI ethics officer. In 2017, Kay became head of AI and machine learning at the World Economic Forum, where her team develops tools and on-the-ground programs to improve AI understanding and governance across the globe. Your reviews are essential to the success of Me, Myself, and AI. For a limited time, we're offering a free download of MIT SMR's best articles on artificial intelligence to listeners who review the show. Send a screenshot of your review to smrfeedback@mit.edu to receive the download. Kay Firth-Butterfield is head of AI and machine learning and a member of the executive committee of the World Economic Forum. In the United Kingdom, she is a barrister with Doughty Street Chambers and has worked as a mediator, arbitrator, part-time judge, business owner, and professor. She is vice chair of the IEEE Global Initiative for Ethical Considerations in Artificial Intelligence and Autonomous Systems and serves on the Polaris Council of the U.S. Government Accountability Office advising on AI. In the final episode of the first season of the Me, Myself, and AI podcast, Kay joins cohosts Sam Ransbotham and Shervin Khodabandeh to discuss the democratization of AI, the values of good governance and ethics in technology, and the importance of having people understand the technology across their organizations -- and society.


China's robotics market: Analyst looks ahead to 2020

#artificialintelligence

The Chinese robotics market is growing strong, but not without its own pains. Trade tensions and a global economic slowdown, particularly in automotive manufacturing, have affected demand in the Chinese robotics market. However, interest in supply chain automation and political support of domestic innovation could encourage growth in 2020. This is Part 2 of The Robot Report's Q&A with Georg Stieler, managing director for Asia at international consulting firm STM Stieler. In Part 1, he discussed the state of the robotics market in China, looking at causes for the current slowdown and what types of robots are in demand.


An artificial intelligence predicts the future

#artificialintelligence

This publication draws on a wide range of expertise to illuminate the year ahead. Even so, all our contributors have one thing in common: they are human. But advances in technology mean it is now possible to ask an artificial intelligence (AI) for its views on the coming year. We asked an AI called GPT-2, created by OpenAI, a research outfit. GPT-2 is an "unsupervised language model" trained using 40 gigabytes of text from the internet.


An artificial intelligence predicts the future

#artificialintelligence

This publication draws on a wide range of expertise to illuminate the year ahead. Even so, all our contributors have one thing in common: they are human. But advances in technology mean it is now possible to ask an artificial intelligence (AI) for its views on the coming year. We asked an AI called GPT-2, created by Openai, a research outfit. GPT-2 is an "unsupervised language model" trained using 40 gigabytes of text from the internet.