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Car screens didn't just go big at CES. They went 3D, with game-worthy graphics.

Mashable

The upcoming Cadillac Lyriq SUV is the first electric car for the Cadillac car brand, but it's the reimagined dashboard display spanning 33 inches across that attracts the most attention. Mercedes-Benz also has a massive 56-inch Hyperscreen that will be available soon in its first EV. These car screens and others introduced at the annual tech show CES feature a new user interface that looks more like a well-rendered video game than an infotainment display to turn up the heat or play a podcast. Past CES shows used to wow with announcements about bigger and bigger dashboard screens, but now it's about what's on them. The Lyriq's 33-inch LED display stands out on its own, but its graphics feel almost too sharp for a screen stuck in a car.


iiot ai_2020-12-25_03-33-58.xlsx

#artificialintelligence

The graph represents a network of 1,228 Twitter users whose tweets in the requested range contained "iiot ai", or who were replied to or mentioned in those tweets. The network was obtained from the NodeXL Graph Server on Friday, 25 December 2020 at 11:39 UTC. The requested start date was Friday, 25 December 2020 at 01:01 UTC and the maximum number of tweets (going backward in time) was 7,500. The tweets in the network were tweeted over the 2-day, 10-hour, 13-minute period from Tuesday, 22 December 2020 at 14:46 UTC to Friday, 25 December 2020 at 01:00 UTC. Additional tweets that were mentioned in this data set were also collected from prior time periods.


Best tech of 2020: an eco vacuum, electric car and a £12 kettle

The Guardian

A robot vacuum that deals with the unpleasant job of emptying the dust bag, a swivelling selfie camera for the YouTube generation and a £12 kettle are among an eclectic list of items dubbed the best products of the year. Experts from the consumer group Which? have picked out 50 items for special praise from the 3,500 reviewed or released over the last year, focusing on their innovation, sustainability or value for money. The most quirky item on the list was the iRobot Roomba s9 vacuum cleaner. While pricey at £1,500, the group said that it is "not only excellent at cleaning, earning a full five stars in this category of Which? Ridding its owner of the grubby job was innovative enough to win a top 50 place. Its reviewers concluded: "Can you put a price on time saved?


futureofwork _2020-10-26_11-51-21.xlsx

#artificialintelligence

The graph represents a network of 4,044 Twitter users whose tweets in the requested range contained "futureofwork ", or who were replied to or mentioned in those tweets. The network was obtained from the NodeXL Graph Server on Monday, 26 October 2020 at 19:01 UTC. The requested start date was Monday, 26 October 2020 at 00:01 UTC and the maximum number of days (going backward) was 14. The maximum number of tweets collected was 7,500. The tweets in the network were tweeted over the 3-day, 8-hour, 43-minute period from Thursday, 22 October 2020 at 15:17 UTC to Monday, 26 October 2020 at 00:00 UTC.


Exclusive dating app for Tesla owners is not a joke (maybe)

Mashable

If you own a Tesla and want a partner to raise a little X Æ A-12 of your own one day, you're in luck: Tesla Dating is an up-and-coming dating site just for you. With the tagline "Because You Can't Spell LOVE Without EV [electric vehicle]," one might think that this is a prank -- and according to founder Ajitpal Grewal, it did start out as one. "To be honest the site was put up as a joke," he told Mashable over email, "but now that I'm seeing some traction I might consider building out the app to launch." There are already prototypes for the app's design: Grewal, a Canadian e-commerce entrepreneur according to the Wall Street Journal, thought of the app after hearing from "countless" friends and acquaintances about how much they love their Teslas. He said, "It seemed like once they became a customer, that's all they wanted to talk about. It became a big part of their identity."


How does Cartica.AI change the world of Artificial Intelligence?

#artificialintelligence

Traditional AI has significant challenges and limitations. As an example let us look at computer vision for automotive safety or autonomy. These systems need to detect objects like a traffic sign, a car or a pedestrian. In order to learn about objects they have to be taught about how those look. One big problem is that there are many so called Edge Cases in which objects look slightly different from the hundreds / thousands which have been taught so far.


Oliver Letwin, the unlikely merchant of technological doom

The Guardian

Oliver Letwin's strange and somewhat alarming new book begins at midnight on Thursday 31 December 2037. In Swindon – stay with me! – a man called Aameen Patel is working the graveyard shift at Highways England's traffic HQ when his computer screen goes blank, and the room is plunged into darkness. He tries to report these things to his superiors, but can get no signal on his mobile. Looking at the motorway from the viewing window by his desk, he observes, not an orderly stream of traffic, but a dramatic pile-up of crashed cars and lorries – at which point he realises something is seriously amiss. In the Britain of 2037, everything, or almost everything, is controlled by 7G wireless technology, from the national grid to the traffic (not only are cars driverless; a vehicle cannot even join a motorway without logging into an "on-route guidance system"). There is, then, only one possible explanation: the entire 7G network must have gone down. It sounds like I'm describing a novel – and it's true that Aameen Patel will soon be joined by another fictional creation in the form of Bill Donoghue, who works at the Bank of England, and whose job it will be to tell the prime minister that the country is about to pay a heavy price for its cashless economy, given that even essential purchases will not be possible until the network is back up (Bill's mother-in-law is also one of thousands of vulnerable people whose carers will soon be unable to get to them, the batteries in their electric cars having gone flat).


A Decade Of Change: How Tech Evolved In The 2010s And What's In Store For The 2020s

#artificialintelligence

Significant technological advancements and societal shifts occurred during the 2010's decade. Yet many of these developments became so quickly engrained in our daily lives that they often went relatively unnoticed, and their impact all but forgotten. Over this next decade, the 2020s, we expect similar rapid and meaningful advancements to occur. Moore's law suggests that over a 10-year period, semiconductors will advance by 32 times, bringing about mesmerizing innovation in the digital age that should not only change technology but society as well. In this piece, we review the technological advancements over the last decade and anticipate what revolutionary changes may be in store for us over the next 10 years.


Experiments in sustainable mobility

#artificialintelligence

Unless you've been living under a rock for the past few years, you will be well aware of the trend towards more conscious consumption. In part recently, this is because of the Greta Thunberg effect, the rise Elon Musk's Tesla electric vehicles and more sustainable forms of transportation such as Bird and Uber JUMP. The future of our planet is very much front of mind for Gen-Z, and our cities (especially our large ones) are some of the most polluted places on earth. Just a few days ago, the UK government announced that the petrol and diesel ban will be brought forward 5 years to 2035 rather than 2040. To add to this, the UK government announced that to accelerate the shift to zero emission cars, all company cars will pay no company car tax in 2020–2021.


Elon Musk hires AI that 'reports directly' to him 24/7

#artificialintelligence

Musk, who has crossed swords with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and former Alibaba Chairman Jack Ma over the role of AI, is finally giving the technology some space, like in his startup Neuralink which is creating a brain-machine interface. Tagging Lex Fridman, popular host of the Artificial Intelligence podcast on YouTube, Musk tweeted: "At Tesla, using AI to solve self-driving isn't just icing on the cake, it the cake" @lexfridman It reports directly to me & we meet/email/text almost every day. My actions, not just words, show how critically I view (benign) AI," the Tesla CEO added. For him, AI can only do'benign' tasks and those jobs too are being evaluated critically by him. Tesla is using advanced AI for vision and planning, supported by efficient use of inference hardware to achieve a general solution to full self-driving. The company is building silicon chips that power its full self-driving software from the ground up, taking every small architectural and micro-architectural improvement into account while pushing hard to squeeze maximum silicon performance-per-watt. The company is applying cutting-edge research to train deep neural networks on problems ranging from perception to control. "Our per-camera networks analyze raw images to perform semantic segmentation, object detection and monocular depth estimation.