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Alphabet's Intrinsic aims to unlock industrial robotics' economic potential

#artificialintelligence

All the sessions from Transform 2021 are available on-demand now. Google parent Alphabet has spun out a new industrial robotics company called Intrinsic. Led by Wendy Tan-White, a veteran entrepreneur and investor who has served as VP of "moonshots" at Alphabet's R&D business X since 2019, Intrinsic is setting out to "unlock the creative and economic potential" of the $42 billion industrial robotics market. The company said it's creating "software tools" to make industrial robots more affordable and easier to use, extending their utility beyond big businesses and to more people -- 70% of the world's manufacturing currently takes place in just 10 countries. Industrial robots have surged in demand over the past year in the wake of the pandemic -- in Q1 this year, the Association for Advancing Automation reported a 19.6% increase in orders across North America alone.


When self-driving cars are coming, for real

#artificialintelligence

Self-driving features have been creeping into automobiles for years, and Tesla (TSLA) even calls its autonomous system "full self-driving." That's hype, not reality: There's still no car on the market that can drive itself under all conditions with no human input. But researchers are getting close, and automotive supplier Mobileye just announced it's deploying a fleet of self-driving prototypes in New York City, to test its technology against hostile drivers, unrepentant jaywalkers, double parkers, omnipresent construction and horse-drawn carriages. The company, a division of Intel (INTC), describes NYC as "one of the world's most challenging driving environments" and says the data from the trial will push full self-driving capability closer to prime time. In an interview, Mobileye CEO Amnon Shashua said fully autonomous cars could be in showrooms by the end of President Biden's first term.


Why Are Self-Driving Cars the Future and How are They Created?

#artificialintelligence

Due to the recent adaptive quarantine measures imposed in virtually all parts of the world, air travel, public transportation, and many other sectors took a really big hit in 2020. However, the automotive world and autonomous vehicles, in particular, have shown increased resilience during this difficult time. In fact, companies like Ford have increased their investments in the development of electric and self-driving cars by allocating $29 billion dollars in the fourth quarter of last year. Specifically, $7 billion of that money will go towards the development of self-driving cars. So Ford is joining General Motors, Tesla, Baidu, and other automakers in heavily investing in autonomous vehicles.


Algorithm May Help Autonomous Vehicles Navigate Narrow, Crowded Streets

#artificialintelligence

The researchers developed a method to model different levels of driver cooperativeness how likely a driver was to pull over to let the other driver pass and used those models to train an algorithm that could assist an autonomous vehicle to safely and efficiently navigate this situation. An algorithm developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) could enable autonomous vehicles to navigate crowded, narrow streets where vehicles traveling in opposite directions do not have enough space to pass each other and there is no knowledge about what the other driver may do. Such a scenario requires collaboration among drivers, who must balance aggression with cooperation. The researchers modeled different levels of cooperation between drivers and used them to train the algorithm. In simulations, the algorithm was found to outperform current models; it has not yet been tested on real-world vehicles.


With Full Self-Driving available on demand, be wary of any and all Teslas

Mashable

In the past week, Tesla's Full Self-Driving beta program went from about 2,000 select drivers testing it to almost any Tesla owner in the U.S. willing to cough up at least $200. U.S. drivers make up at least half of the more than 1.4 million Teslas worldwide, so there's a lot more opportunity to encounter someone with the hands-free, not-quite-autonomous driving mode engaged. Other drivers likely won't know when a nearby Tesla has FSD is turned on, but if they see one struggling on busy city roads, that might give fellow motorists and pedestrians a clue. The electric car company released last week a monthly $199 subscription option for open access to the feature that auto-steers, -accelerates, and -brakes, all while the driver looks at the road ahead, hands on lap, ready to take over. During the FSD beta period, which launched in October, only a carefully selected group of early adopters had access to the feature.


Self-Driving Cars That Snitch On Human Drivers For Bending Or Breaking Driving Laws

#artificialintelligence

Will self-driving cars be snitches? Are you familiar with the expression that someone is a fink or a no-good dirty rat? Perhaps you might be more acquainted with other ways that this is commonly depicted such as those that are characterized as a weasel, a snitch, or a stoolie. Let's add to the matter a vexing ethical question, namely whether someone can be considered a stool pigeon or a squealer even if they are reporting on something that was an illegal or unlawful act? You would normally be tempted to assert that reporting a prohibited act is entirely appropriate and the tipster or whistleblower ought to be rewarded rather than ostracized as a tattler or snitch. Okay, consider a real-world example and see how you do. You are driving along on your daily journey to the office. There is a stop sign at an upcoming intersection.


Ethics of AI: From A to Z

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence ethics is something everyone's talking about now. Self-driving cars, face recognition and critical assessment systems are all cutting-edge solutions that raise a lot of ethical considerations.


A Venice art installation will change the way you look at things -- Future Blink

Mashable

The French artist Vincent Leroy debuted a new installation in the Venice canals, complete with 60 magnifying glasses.


Self-driving cars confront a daunting new challenge: New York City streets

Washington Post - Technology News

Mobileye received a special permit from New York state, allowing manufacturers of "autonomous vehicle technology" to test on public streets. The permit requires that drivers be present in the vehicle but allows them to keep their hands off the steering wheel yet "be prepared to take control when required to … operate the vehicle safely and lawfully." It's unclear whether others may have applied. The state hasn't responded to a request for comment.


Intel's Mobileye takes its autonomous vehicle testing program to New York City – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

Mobileye, a subsidiary of Intel, has expanded its autonomous vehicle testing program to New York City as part of its strategy to develop and deploy the technology. New York City joins a number of other cities, including Detroit, Paris, Shanghai and Tokyo, where Mobileye has either launched testing or plans to this year. Mobileye launched its first test fleet in Jerusalem in 2018 and added one in Munich in 2020. "If we want to build something that will scale, we need to be able to drive in challenging places and almost everywhere," Mobileye president and CEO Amnon Shashua said during a presentation Tuesday that was streamed live. As part of the announcement, Mobileye also released a 40-minute unedited video of one of its test vehicles equipped with a self-driving system navigating New York's city streets.