Automobiles & Trucks


What caused fatal Tesla crash?

FOX News

An investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has determined that "operational limitations" of Tesla's Autopilot system played a "major role" in a fatal crash last May, but that the driver was also at fault for not paying adequate attention to the road. At the time, Autopilot was capable of steering the car within its lane and autonomously braking for vehicles in the road ahead. His last action was setting the cruise control at 74 mph on the 65 mph road, two minutes before the collision. The NTSB report was issued on the same day that U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao revealed the federal government's latest voluntary guidelines for autonomous technology, which includes a section on driver monitoring and the transfer of control from vehicle to operator when a system determines that human interaction is required.


First real self driving car?

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General Motors-owned Cruise Automation has revealed what it claims is the first mass-producible car capable of driving itself. In a blog post, Cruise CEO Kyle Vogt said the Chevrolet Bolt-based vehicle is equipped with all of the sensors and redundant equipment to safely put it on the road without a driver when the software to operate it is fully-developed. No timeline for final validation of the software was revealed, and public sales are not yet planned. Tesla also claims its new Model 3 is equipped with the hardware needed for full self-driving capability, but has not said when its software will be ready to activate the function.


Musk: THIS could cause WW3

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Renowned for his concerns over artificial intelligence and its potential negative impact on humanity, tech titan Elon Musk has made his most concerning comments yet surrounding AI. In a series of tweets on Monday, the Tesla, SpaceX, Neuralink and OpenAI co-founder wrote that artificial intelligence could be the eventual cause of the next world war. Musk's comments were in response to comments made by Russian President Vladimir Putin, who said that the country "who becomes the leader in this sphere [artificial intelligence] will be the ruler of the world." VLADIMIR PUTIN SAYS THE LEADER IN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE'WILL BE THE RULER OF THE WORLD' Musk's companies, specifically Tesla, have used artificial intelligence to enhance its products and services.


Apple car had sphere wheels?

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Apple tried to reinvent the wheel. In a wide-ranging New York Times report on the technology company's efforts to enter the autonomous car arena, insiders revealed that one team researched the idea of replacing traditional wheels and tires with spheres that would allow a car to move side to side more easily. They weren't the only ones to explore idea, it's showed up in science fiction several times and Goodyear last year showed a concept for spherical wheels that use magnetic levitation to suspend the car above them. Eventually, it gave on the idea of building a car and began to focus on the technology that will enable autonomy instead.


This saves many lives

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Electronic blind-spot monitoring and lane-keeping systems do help to prevent crashes, according to new studies from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. A second institute study of blind-spot detection systems -- usually warning lights in side mirrors -- found the systems lower the rate of all lane-change crashes by 14 percent and the rate of such crashes with injuries by 23 percent. A separate study by the insurance industry-funded institute and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's AgeLab found that drivers using automated systems that scan for parking spots and then park the car spend a lot more time looking at dashboard displays than at the parking spot, the road in front or the road behind. Automakers, taking note of the problem, appear to be switching to systems that vibrate the steering wheel or driver's seat, Cicchino said.


Google car is cushy

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As it continues to improve its sensor technology to help its vehicle understand its surroundings and respond quickly and safely to unfolding events, it's also been considering how to deal with unavoidable collisions, whether it's with a "soft" human that could easily sustain an injury, or a harder object like another vehicle. A patent recently awarded to Waymo offers some insight into how the company is approaching the issue. In Waymo's own words: "The vehicle may contain tension members that are arranged so that a change in tension across one or more of the tension members will alter the rigidity of the vehicle's surface. The vehicle may identify and respond to a potential collision by altering the tension that is applied to one or more tension members, thereby altering the rigidity of the vehicle's surface."


Michigan gov: 'Strong possibility' Foxconn opens facility - Foxconn incentives package to cost Wisconsin $50M in lost tax revenue

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The Taiwanese electronics manufacturer recently announced plans to build a massive $10 billion plant in Wisconsin. In a phone interview from Shanghai, where he was concluding a nine-day trade trip in China, Snyder told the Associated Press Monday night there is a "strong possibility" for Foxconn to still locate in the state after the company in recent weeks picked neighboring Wisconsin for a $10 billion display panel plant with 3,000 employees that could grow to 13,000. They discussed the autonomous vehicle industry and advanced manufacturing, Snyder said. But we're going to continue to present them good opportunities of what we can do in Michigan."


Toyota now has a robot that can help disabled people around the house

FOX News

And with that, the company has shown off its Human Support Robot (HSR), after testing it with a U.S. war veteran in his home. We see our research with Romy and the HSR as a natural extension of our work as a mobility company that helps people navigate their world." Since then, the company has experimented with robots in a number of different applications, including helping paralyzed people walk. In 2015, Toyota created the Toyota Research Institute, saying it would put $1 billion into it over five years, to help advance artificial intelligence and different mobility solutions, including robots.


Official: VW Bus is back!

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VW brand Chairman Herbert Diess has confirmed to Auto Express that a model based on the electric I.D. Buzz features a battery pack mounted flat in the floor, Tesla Model X-style, that VW says is good for 270 miles of range and is equipped with a wireless charging system that can deliver an 80 percent charge in just 30 minutes. Buzz features a highly configurable interior, with seats that can be turned into tables and beds, and front chairs that can be rotated to face the back. That's because it was designed with fully-autonomous driving capabilities in mind, something VW hopes to add by as early as 2025.


Musk: Robots will be better!

FOX News

The performance of humans' puny brains will be outmatched by computers within just 13 years, billionaire Elon Musk has claimed. According to the terrifying research from boffs at the University of Oxford, it's not looking good for us humans. Within ten years computers will be better at driving a truck than us and by 2031 they will be better at selling goods and will put millions of retail workers on the dole queue. In fact, every single human job will be automated within the next 120 years, according to computer experts the university researchers quizzed.