Goto

Collaborating Authors

Results


60 Best FREE Online Courses for Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Are you looking for the Best Free Online Courses for Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence? If yes, then this article will definitely help you and provide the 60 best free online courses for machine learning & artificial intelligence from various platforms. I would recommend you bookmark this article for future reference. Because this article will not only provide free courses but also saves your searching time for different free courses for machine learning and artificial intelligence. So without any further ado, let's get started- For your convenience, I have created a table, so that you can filter out the course according to your need.


Machine Learning for Trading

#artificialintelligence

Students should have strong coding skills and some familiarity with equity markets. No finance or machine learning experience is assumed. Note that this course serves students focusing on computer science, as well as students in other majors such as industrial systems engineering, management, or math who have different experiences. All types of students are welcome! The ML topics might be "review" for CS students, while finance parts will be review for finance students.


Machine Learning with ML.Net for Absolute Beginners

#artificialintelligence

Hey, My name is Nilay Mehta! I am an experienced .Net developer, having the Microsoft certificate of Programming with C#.Net. I have a Master of Computer Applications and Bachelor of Computer Application degrees. I've worked with a range of development tools from PHP, C#, ASP.NET, and ASP.Net core. I am a passionate software engineer who loves learning new technologies, and from the past 3 years, I'm enjoying sharing that knowledge through blogs and courses.


Classification of Pedagogical content using conventional machine learning and deep learning model

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Billions of users create a large amount of data every day, which in a sense comes from various types of sources. This data is in most cases unorganized and unclassified and is presented in various formats such as text, video, audio, or images. Processing and analyzing this data is a major challenge that we face every day. The problem of unstructured and unorganized text dates back to ancient times, but Text Classification as a discipline first appeared in the early 60s, where 30 years later the interest in various spheres for it increased [1], and began to be applied in various types of domains and applications such as for movie review [2], document classification [3], ecommerce [4], social media [5], online courses [6, 7], etc. As interest has grown more in the upcoming years, the uses start solving the problems with higher accurate results in more flexible ways. Knowledge Engineering (KE) was one of the applications of text classification in the late 80s, where the process took place by manually defining rules based on expert knowledge in terms of categorization of the document for a particular category [1]. After this time, there was a great wave of use of various modern and advanced methods for text classification, which all improved this discipline and made it more interesting for scientists and researchers, more specifically the use of machine learning techniques. These techniques bring a lot of advantages, as they are now in very large numbers, where they provide solutions to almost every problem we may encounter. The need for education and learning dates back to ancient times, where people are constantly improving and trying to gain as much knowledge as possible.


Attention Based Video Summaries of Live Online Zoom Classes

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This paper describes a system developed to help University students get more from their online lectures, tutorials, laboratory and other live sessions. We do this by logging their attention levels on their laptops during live Zoom sessions and providing them with personalised video summaries of those live sessions. Using facial attention analysis software we create personalised video summaries composed of just the parts where a student's attention was below some threshold. We can also factor in other criteria into video summary generation such as parts where the student was not paying attention while others in the class were, and parts of the video that other students have replayed extensively which a given student has not. Attention and usage based video summaries of live classes are a form of personalised content, they are educational video segments recommended to highlight important parts of live sessions, useful in both topic understanding and in exam preparation. The system also allows a Professor to review the aggregated attention levels of those in a class who attended a live session and logged their attention levels. This allows her to see which parts of the live activity students were paying most, and least, attention to. The Help-Me-Watch system is deployed and in use at our University in a way that protects student's personal data, operating in a GDPR-compliant way.


Educational Content Linking for Enhancing Learning Need Remediation in MOOCs

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Since its introduction in 2011, there have been over 4000 MOOCs on various subjects on the Web, serving over 35 million learners. MOOCs have shown the ability to democratize knowledge dissemination and bring the best education in the world to every learner. However, the disparate distances between participants, the size of the learner population, and the heterogeneity of the learners' backgrounds make it extremely difficult for instructors to interact with the learners in a timely manner, which adversely affects learning experience. To address the challenges, in this thesis, we propose a framework: educational content linking. By linking and organizing pieces of learning content scattered in various course materials into an easily accessible structure, we hypothesize that this framework can provide learners guidance and improve content navigation. Since most instruction and knowledge acquisition in MOOCs takes place when learners are surveying course materials, better content navigation may help learners find supporting information to resolve their confusion and thus improve learning outcome and experience. To support our conjecture, we present end-to-end studies to investigate our framework around two research questions: 1) can manually generated linking improve learning? 2) can learning content be generated with machine learning methods? For studying the first question, we built an interface that present learning materials and visualize the linking among them simultaneously. We found the interface enables users to search for desired course materials more efficiently, and retain more concepts more readily. For the second question, we propose an automatic content linking algorithm based on conditional random fields. We demonstrate that automatically generated linking can still lead to better learning, although the magnitude of the improvement over the unlinked interface is smaller.


Machine Learning Towards Intelligent Systems: Applications, Challenges, and Opportunities

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The emergence and continued reliance on the Internet and related technologies has resulted in the generation of large amounts of data that can be made available for analyses. However, humans do not possess the cognitive capabilities to understand such large amounts of data. Machine learning (ML) provides a mechanism for humans to process large amounts of data, gain insights about the behavior of the data, and make more informed decision based on the resulting analysis. ML has applications in various fields. This review focuses on some of the fields and applications such as education, healthcare, network security, banking and finance, and social media. Within these fields, there are multiple unique challenges that exist. However, ML can provide solutions to these challenges, as well as create further research opportunities. Accordingly, this work surveys some of the challenges facing the aforementioned fields and presents some of the previous literature works that tackled them. Moreover, it suggests several research opportunities that benefit from the use of ML to address these challenges.


Access an online course bundle in machine learning for under £15

Mashable

TL;DR: The Machine Learning for Beginners Overview Bundle is on sale for £14.80 as of Dec. 20, saving you 96% on list price. Learning this technology is far from a walk in the park, but it's worth it. Ready to give it a shot? Check out this Machine Learning for Beginners Overview Bundle, a three-part pack of classes designed to walk beginners through the basics of machine learning without getting too in the weeds. The content spans seven hours total and requires no prior knowledge.


Variational Beam Search for Online Learning with Distribution Shifts

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We consider the problem of online learning in the presence of sudden distribution shifts as frequently encountered in applications such as autonomous navigation. Distribution shifts require constant performance monitoring and re-training. They may also be hard to detect and can lead to a slow but steady degradation in model performance. To address this problem we propose a new Bayesian meta-algorithm that can both (i) make inferences about subtle distribution shifts based on minimal sequential observations and (ii) accordingly adapt a model in an online fashion. The approach uses beam search over multiple change point hypotheses to perform inference on a hierarchical sequential latent variable modeling framework. Our proposed approach is model-agnostic, applicable to both supervised and unsupervised learning, and yields significant improvements over state-of-the-art Bayesian online learning approaches.


Online Learning Demands in Max-min Fairness

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We describe mechanisms for the allocation of a scarce resource among multiple users in a way that is efficient, fair, and strategy-proof, but when users do not know their resource requirements. The mechanism is repeated for multiple rounds and a user's requirements can change on each round. At the end of each round, users provide feedback about the allocation they received, enabling the mechanism to learn user preferences over time. Such situations are common in the shared usage of a compute cluster among many users in an organisation, where all teams may not precisely know the amount of resources needed to execute their jobs. By understating their requirements, users will receive less than they need and consequently not achieve their goals. By overstating them, they may siphon away precious resources that could be useful to others in the organisation. We formalise this task of online learning in fair division via notions of efficiency, fairness, and strategy-proofness applicable to this setting, and study this problem under three types of feedback: when the users' observations are deterministic, when they are stochastic and follow a parametric model, and when they are stochastic and nonparametric. We derive mechanisms inspired by the classical max-min fairness procedure that achieve these requisites, and quantify the extent to which they are achieved via asymptotic rates. We corroborate these insights with an experimental evaluation on synthetic problems and a web-serving task.