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Exclusive Talk with Toby Lewis, Global Head of Threat Analysis at Darktrace

#artificialintelligence

Toby: My role here at Darktrace is the Global Head of Threat Analysis. My day-to-day job involves looking at the 100 or so cybersecurity analysts we have spread from New Zealand to Singapore, the UK, and most major time zones in the US. My main role is to evaluate how we can use the Darktrace platform to work with our customers. How can we ensure that our customers get the most out of our cybersecurity expertise and support when using AI to secure their network? The other half of my role at Darktrace is subject matter expertise. This role involves talking to reporters like yourself or our customers who want to hear more about what Darktrace can do to help them from a cybersecurity perspective, discussing the context of current events. That part of my role was born out of a nearly 20-year career in cybersecurity. I first started in government and was one of the founding members of the National Cybersecurity Center here in the UK.


Deep hierarchical reinforcement agents for automated penetration testing

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Penetration testing the organised attack of a computer system in order to test existing defences has been used extensively to evaluate network security. This is a time consuming process and requires in-depth knowledge for the establishment of a strategy that resembles a real cyber-attack. This paper presents a novel deep reinforcement learning architecture with hierarchically structured agents called HA-DRL, which employs an algebraic action decomposition strategy to address the large discrete action space of an autonomous penetration testing simulator where the number of actions is exponentially increased with the complexity of the designed cybersecurity network. The proposed architecture is shown to find the optimal attacking policy faster and more stably than a conventional deep Q-learning agent which is commonly used as a method to apply artificial intelligence in automatic penetration testing.


Top 10 predictions of how AI is going to improve cybersecurity In 2021

#artificialintelligence

There is no denying that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the future of cybersecurity. In other words, the future of cybersecurity lies in the hands of Artificial Intelligence (AI). Companies or medium-sized corporations can counter various cyber threats using the advanced concepts of AI. If you want to know about different AI predictions that will positively influence cybersecurity in 2021 and in the future, read this post in detail. According to a recent research conducted by Trend Micro, Artificial Intelligence (AI) will replace the need for human beings by the end of 2030.


Security and Privacy for Artificial Intelligence: Opportunities and Challenges

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The increased adoption of Artificial Intelligence (AI) presents an opportunity to solve many socio-economic and environmental challenges; however, this cannot happen without securing AI-enabled technologies. In recent years, most AI models are vulnerable to advanced and sophisticated hacking techniques. This challenge has motivated concerted research efforts into adversarial AI, with the aim of developing robust machine and deep learning models that are resilient to different types of adversarial scenarios. In this paper, we present a holistic cyber security review that demonstrates adversarial attacks against AI applications, including aspects such as adversarial knowledge and capabilities, as well as existing methods for generating adversarial examples and existing cyber defence models. We explain mathematical AI models, especially new variants of reinforcement and federated learning, to demonstrate how attack vectors would exploit vulnerabilities of AI models. We also propose a systematic framework for demonstrating attack techniques against AI applications and reviewed several cyber defences that would protect AI applications against those attacks. We also highlight the importance of understanding the adversarial goals and their capabilities, especially the recent attacks against industry applications, to develop adaptive defences that assess to secure AI applications. Finally, we describe the main challenges and future research directions in the domain of security and privacy of AI technologies.


Survey: 53% of young cybersecurity professionals fear replacement by automation

#artificialintelligence

Although the image of the tech-confused Boomer is a deeply-rooted stereotype, TechRepublic has reported that this is, in fact, a myth: In actuality, a Dropbox survey found that "people over age 55 are actually less likely than their younger colleagues to find using tech in the workplace stressful." A new report from security advisors Exabeam--2020 Cybersecurity Professionals Salary, Skills and Stress Survey--emphasizes these findings, as well. The research shows that although a whopping 88% of cybersecurity professionals embrace new technology, confident that automation will help them in their roles, it is the younger generation that is skeptical: 53% of respondents under the age of 45 "agreed or strongly agreed that AI and ML are a threat to their job security," according to the report. The findings, part of an annual survey, looked at attitudes regarding salary, training, innovation, and emerging technologies like artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML), among 350 cybersecurity professionals worldwide, hailing from the US, Germany, Singapore, Australia, and the UK. Overall, the results were positive, and the findings show that cybersecurity professionals continue to be satisfied in their jobs.


A New Tool For Hackers โ€“ AI in Cybersecurity - Security Boulevard

#artificialintelligence

There's no denying the crisis created by a sudden rise in automated phishing attacks. And while IT leaders are using AI to take security to the next level, what if this technology falls into the wrong hands- the bad guys? The dawn of the internet and advances in computing means we're able to trigger an exact solution to complex problems in diverse areas โ€“ ranging from astrophysics and biological systems to automation and precision. But at the same time, these systems are inherently vulnerable to cyber threats. In this fast-paced world where innovations come and go in the blink of the eye, cybersecurity remains top-of-mind, especially for companies dabbling with data-rich transformations such as the Internet of Things (IoT).


Capgemini report shows why AI is the future of cybersecurity

#artificialintelligence

These and many other insights are from Capgemini's Reinventing Cybersecurity with Artificial Intelligence Report published this week. Capgemini Research Institute surveyed 850 senior executives from seven industries, including consumer products, retail, banking, insurance, automotive, utilities, and telecom. Enterprises headquartered in France, Germany, the UK, the US, Australia, the Netherlands, India, Italy, Spain, and Sweden are included in the report. Please see page 21 of the report for a description of the methodology. Capgemini found that as digital businesses grow, their risk of cyberattacks exponentially increases.


Why AI Is The Future Of Cybersecurity

#artificialintelligence

These and many other insights are from Capgemini's Reinventing Cybersecurity with Artificial Intelligence Report published this week. Capgemini Research Institute surveyed 850 senior executives from seven industries, including consumer products, retail, banking, insurance, automotive, utilities, and telecom. Enterprises headquartered in France, Germany, the UK, the US, Australia, the Netherlands, India, Italy, Spain, and Sweden are included in the report. Please see page 21 of the report for a description of the methodology. Capgemini found that as digital businesses grow, their risk of cyberattacks exponentially increases.


RMIT partners with NAB and Palo Alto Networks for new cybersecurity course

ZDNet

The smartest companies now approach cybersecurity with a risk management strategy. Learn how to make policies to protect your most important digital assets. The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) has announced a new online course on cybersecurity in a bid to address Australia's cybersecurity skills shortage. As part of the course, RMIT Online has partnered with the National Australia Bank (NAB) and Palo Alto Networks, with both organisations to provide mentors for the course. The course, called Cyber Security Risk and Strategy, will cover topics such as the fundamentals of cybersecurity and how to apply cybersecurity risk mitigation strategies to an organisation.