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The US's top 15 emerging jobs of 2020, according to LinkedIn

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It's never a bad time to be an engineer--or to have people skills. LinkedIn's third annual US emerging jobs report has identified the 15 fastest-growing jobs, as well as the skills and cities most associated with them. This year the company found that the number of artificial intelligence and data science roles continue to expand across nearly every industry. For the first time, robotics has made an appearance on the list, and at least five roles in the ranking include the word "engineer" in the title. But it's not just high-tech roles that have seen a lot more hiring action in the past five years, which is how far back LinkedIn looks to measure the emergence of roles based on user profile data and hiring growth trends.


Sproutt raises $12 million to find your best life insurance policy with AI

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Life insurance isn't as popular as it once was, despite the fact that a majority of people consider it to be important. Over 80% of consumers agreed in a recent survey that people need a life insurance policy, yet just 62% say they have one themselves. In fact, only 44% of U.S. households held individual life insurance as of 2010 -- a 50-year low -- compared with the 72% of Americans who owned life insurance in 1960. A New York- and Hartford, Connecticut-based startup hopes to reverse the trend with a novel service that rewards policyholders for making smart lifestyle choices. Dubbed Sproutt Insurance, it's the brainchild of insurance tech company Akitbo CEO Yoav Shaham, who nearly two years ago set out to blend analytics and health insights with AI to match people with life insurance providers.


Global Big Data Conference

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We've been told that there is nothing to worry about artificial intelligence, robots and technology. New technologies will only replace mundane, repetitive jobs and free up workers to do more meaningful work, claims the media and top management consulting firms. Last week, the House Financial Services Committee's Task Force on Artificial Intelligence conducted a meeting with university academics and Wall Street financial services professionals to discuss the impact of AI on trading, robo-advisory, market surveillance and other activities within the financial services sector. To set the tone, the report by Wells Fargo predicting 200,000 banking jobs in the U.S. will be lost over the next decade--due to the introduction of new technologies--was cited by the chairman of the AI Task Force, Rep. Bill Foster (D-Ill). According to Marcos Lopez de Prado, the former head of machine learning at AQR Capital Management, algorithms in electronic markets have already automated the jobs once dominated by thousands of traders.


IBM Unveils Power9-based AI Supercomputer

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Designed to push the frontiers of computing chip and systems performance optimized for AI workloads, an 8 petaflop IBM Power9-based supercomputer has been unveiled in upstate New York that will be used by IBM data and computer scientists, by academic researchers and by industrial and commercial end-users. Installed at the New York State-IBM Research AI Hardware Center in Albany, NY, the system -- called AiMOS (Artificial Intelligence Multiprocessing Optimized System) – was the most powerful to debut on last month's Top500 supercomputer ranking, it's listed as the world's 24th most powerful computer, the most powerful to be housed at a private university and – according to the Green500 listing – the third most energy efficient. It was built using the same IBM Power Systems technology as the Top500's nos. 1 and 2, systems, the US Dept. of Energy's IBM Summit and Sierra supercomputers, based on IBM Power9 CPUs and Nvidia GPUs. AiMOS is the result of a collaboration between IBM, RPI and two New York state programs, Empire State Development (ESD) and NY CREATES. Named for Rensselaer co-founder Amos Eaton, AiMOS will serve as a test bed for computation, modeling and simulation of hardware "designed to push the boundaries of AI performance," IBM said.


Artificial Intelligence Is Superseding Well-Paying Wall Street Jobs

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The New York Stock Exchange floor is devoid of humans and runs primarily on technology conducting ... [ ] the electronic trading activities. We've been told that there is nothing to worry about artificial intelligence, robots and technology. New technologies will only replace mundane, repetitive jobs and free up workers to do more meaningful work, claims the media and top management consulting firms. Last week, the House Financial Services Committee's Task Force on Artificial Intelligence conducted a meeting with university academics and Wall Street financial services professionals to discuss the impact of AI on trading, robo-advisory, market surveillance and other activities within the financial services sector. To set the tone, the report by Wells Fargo predicting 200,000 banking jobs in the U.S. will be lost over the next decade--due to the introduction of new technologies--was cited by the chairman of the AI Task Force, Rep. Bill Foster (D-Ill).


Machine learning can create meaningful conversations on death - ET CIO

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New York, Researchers at University of Vermont have used machine learning and natural language processing (NLP) to better understand conversations about death, which could eventually help doctors improve their end-of-life communication. Some of the most important, and difficult, conversations in healthcare are the ones that happen amid serious and life-threatening illnesses. Discussions of the treatment options and prognoses in these settings are a delicate balance for doctors and nurses who are dealing with people at their most vulnerable point and may not fully understand what the future holds. "We want to understand this complex thing called a conversation. Our major goal is to scale up the measurement of conversations so we can re-engineer the healthcare system to communicate better," said Robert Gramling, director of the Vermont Conversation Lab in the study published in the journal Patient Education and Counselling.


Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning May Help in Understanding MS Cause, Groups Say

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Combining data science, artificial intelligence (AI), and machine learning to better identify patterns that may underlie the cause or causes of multiple sclerosis (MS) is the focus of a novel partnership. Despite numerous advances in MS research and treatments, what causes the disease is still unknown. "Given the complexity of MS and the urgent need to help patients that are living with this diagnosis, we wanted to explore new ways to infuse technology into our research," Saud A. Sadiq, MD, director and chief research scientist at the Tisch MS Research Center of New York (Tisch MSRCNY), said in a press release. Sadiq and fellow researchers at Tisch MSRCNY collaborated with Deloitte, a consulting and advisory services company. Tisch MSRCNY is a nonprofit center specialized in MS, its causes, biomarkers, and other disease research tools.


Machine learning research may aid industry

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What do these topics have in common? The answer can be found in machine learning research at Binghamton University. Dana Bani-Hani, a doctoral student studying industrial and systems engineering, has spent the past few years teaching machines how to read data sets in any industry. The system she coded, called a Recursive General Regression Neural Network Oracle (R-GRNN Oracle), takes data inputs and creates prediction outputs. Classification models are not new in data science and analytics, but what Bani-Hani created goes beyond the basics.


Kartik Talamadupula - IBM

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Kartik Talamadupula is a research staff member at IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York in the AI Science - Reasoning group in IBM Research AI. His research interests lie in the field of Automated Planning, within the wider umbrella of Artificial Intelligence (AI), and in examining the issues inherent in using planning and reasoning technologies as mediators in human-machine teams. He also has research interests in reinforcement learning, conversation and dialog systems, crowdsourcing/human computation, AI for IoT, and information retrieval on social media (specifically Twitter). He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science in Fall 2014 from Arizona State University, where he worked on extending the frontiers of AI planning methods and technologies. His research focused on understanding, analyzing, and extending the role that automated planners can play as part of integrated AI systems that interact directly and cooperatively with humans.


AiMOS, Most Powerful Supercomputer at a Private University, to Focus on AI Research

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Part of a collaboration between IBM, Empire State Development (ESD), and NY CREATES, the eight petaflop IBM POWER9-equipped AI supercomputer is configured to help enable users to explore new AI applications and accelerate economic development from New York's smallest startups to its largest enterprises. Named AiMOS (short for Artificial Intelligence Multiprocessing Optimized System in honor of Rensselaer co-founder Amos Eaton, the machine will serve as a test bed for the New York State - IBM Research AI Hardware Center, which opened on the SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) campus in Albany earlier this year. The AI Hardware Center aims to advance the development of computing chips and systems that are designed and optimized for AI workloads to push the boundaries of AI performance. AiMOS will provide the modeling, simulation, and computation necessary to support the development of this hardware. "Computer artificial intelligence, or more appropriately, human augmented intelligence (AI), will help solve pressing problems, from healthcare to security to climate change. In order to realize AI's full potential, special purpose computing hardware is emerging as the next big opportunity," said Dr. John E. Kelly III, IBM Executive Vice President.