Results


Artificial Intelligence Could Create a Big Change on Wall Street

#artificialintelligence

We spoke with Ed Amoroso, CEO of TAG Cyber, which is a cybersecurity firm based in New York City, about how the markets could potentially change as a result of artificial intelligence. He's got a potentially surprising perspective when it comes to how they could potentially stabilize the prices of major equities. Téléchargez la publication 7 Business Models - 7 Secteurs pour vous inspirer en 2017! Téléchargez la publication 55 Questions pour Imaginer votre Business Models!


How Daily Employee Monitoring Could Make Data Breaches a Thing of the Past

#artificialintelligence

In "The Minority Report," a specialized police force called PreCrime deploys psychics called "Precogs," who can see crimes before they happen, which allows the police to apprehend a would-be killer before he or she can do the deed. A similar type of predictive behavior profiling is being deployed in workplace settings. Companies such as Boston Consulting and Microsoft have begun monitoring emails and chat logs to map the flow of employee communications. It has long been technically possible for an employer to collect an employee's digital breadcrumbs and use them to determine if an employee's pattern of online behaviors signals an intent to do something the company frowns on--and of course they can see behaviors that could put the company in danger of a breach or compromise. Wall Street brokerage firms and big casinos are big practitioners of this form of monitoring to guard the integrity of their network transactions.


Artificial intelligence could create a big change on Wall Street

#artificialintelligence

We spoke with Ed Amoroso, CEO of TAG Cyber, a cybersecurity firm based in New York City, about how the markets could potentially change as a result of artificial intelligence. He's got a surprising perspective when it comes to how they could potentially stabilize the prices of major equities.


A Guide to Russia's High Tech Tool Box for Subverting US Democracy

WIRED

Twitter trolls run by the Kremlin's Internet Research Agency. Denial of service attacks and ransomware deployed across Ukraine. Spies hidden in the heart of Wall Street. And a century-old fabricated staple of anti-Semitic hate literature. At first glance these disparate phenomena might seem only vaguely connected. Sure, they can all be traced back to Russia. But is there any method to their badness? The definitive answer, according to Russia experts inside and outside the US government, is most certainly yes. In fact, they are part of an increasingly digital intelligence playbook known as "active measures," a wide-ranging set of techniques and strategies that Russian military and intelligence services deploy to influence the affairs of nations across the globe. As the investigation into Russia's influence on the 2016 election--and the Trump campaign's potential participation in that effort--has intensified this summer, the Putin regime's systematic effort to undermine and destabilize democracies has become the subject of urgent focus in the West. According to interviews with more than a dozen US and European intelligence officials and diplomats, Russian active measures represent perhaps the biggest challenge to the Western order since the fall of the Berlin Wall. The consensus: Vladimir Putin, playing a poor hand economically and demographically at home, is seeking to destabilize the multilateral institutions, partnerships, and Western democracies that have kept the peace during the past seven decades.


Wall Street's Next Frontier Is Hacking Into Emotions of Traders

#artificialintelligence

The trader was in deep trouble. A millennial who had only recently been allowed to set foot on a Wall Street floor, he made bad bets, and in a panic to recoup his losses, he'd blown through risk limits, losing 4.9 million in a single afternoon. The trader was taking part in a simulation run by Andrew Lo, an MIT finance professor. The goal: find out if top performers can be identified based on how they respond to market volatility. Lo had been invited into the New York-based global investment bank--he wouldn't say which one--after giving a talk to its executives.