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Podcast: How pricing algorithms learn to collude

MIT Technology Review

Algorithms now determine how much things cost. It's called dynamic pricing and it adjusts according to current market conditions in order to increase profits. The rise of e-commerce has propelled pricing algorithms into an everyday occurrence--whether you're shopping on Amazon, booking a flight, hotel or ordering an Uber. In this continuation of our series on automation and your wallet, we explore what happens when a machine determines the price you pay. This episode was reported by Anthony Green and produced by Jennifer Strong and Emma Cillekens. We're edited by Mat Honan and our mix engineer is Garret Lang, with sound design and music by Jacob Gorski. Jennifer: Alright so I'm in an airport just outside New York City and just looking at the departures board here seeing all these flights going different places… It makes me think about how we decide how much something should cost… like a ticket for one of these flights. Because where the plane is going is just part of the puzzle. The price of airfare is highly personalized.


After US sanctions, Huawei turns to new businesses to boost sales

#artificialintelligence

Six months after the Trump administration dealt a crushing blow to Huawei Technologies Co.'s smartphone business, the Chinese telecommunications giant is turning to less glamorous alternatives that may eventually offset the decline of its biggest revenue contributor. Among its newest customers is a fish farm in eastern China that's twice the size of New York's Central Park. The farm is covered with tens of thousands of solar panels outfitted with Huawei's inverters to shield its fish from excessive sunlight while generating power. About 370 miles to the west in coal-rich Shanxi province, wireless sensors and cameras deep beneath the earth monitor oxygen levels and potential machine malfunctions in mine pit -- all supplied by the tech titan. And next month, a shiny new electric car featuring its lidar sensor will debut at China's largest auto show.


Apple Car speculation is back. Here's what we know so far

CNN Top Stories

New York (CNN Business)Longstanding speculation that Apple will release its own electric, self-driving car was reignited last week when Reuters, citing unnamed sources, reported that Apple plans to produce a passenger vehicle by 2024. Talk of the iPhone maker's ambitions to break into the auto industry has been swirling for about five years. Expectations for the effort, named Project Titan, range from the company developing its own Apple-branded car to providing operating system software to existing car manufacturers. In April 2017, Apple received a permit from the California Department of Motor Vehicles to test self-driving vehicles there. An Apple car has the potential to be "a transformative event" for the automobile and mobility industry in the coming decades, Morgan Stanley analysts wrote in a note to investors last week -- much as the iPhone changed the game for mobile phones.


Sprint's 5G wireless launch, planned for May, could be the country's first

Washington Post - Technology News

Sprint customers in Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas and Kansas City will be among the first to test the company's 5G wireless network when it launches in May, executives said Monday. Expect an additional five markets -- Houston, Los Angeles, New York, Phoenix and Washington, D.C. -- to come online by the first half of the year, said Sprint chief executive Michel Combes. The impending launch could make Sprint the first U.S. wireless carrier to offer a mass-market 5G service for smartphones in a global race to provide faster download speeds and support for new applications such as self-driving cars. Customers of Google Fi, the wireless service run by Google on Sprint's network, will be able to connect to Sprint's 5G capabilities, as well, Combes said -- though it is unclear when Google Fi customers will gain access to 5G smartphones that can take advantage of the new technology. Company officials declined to say how Sprint's 5G plans will be sold to consumers, or at what price.


Uber And Lyft IPOs Will Make Many People Rich But Not The Drivers

#artificialintelligence

HONG KONG, CHINA - 2018/12/02: American online ridesharing and transportation network company Uber logo is seen on an Android mobile device with a figure of hacker in the background. The tech, Wall Street, and investment castes are positively buzzing about Lyft and Uber going public. Lots of money to be made. The anticipatory buzz has been building for a time. The two rideshare companies certainly need access to cash.


OnePlus forced to change 6T release date because of Apple event

The Independent - Tech

OnePlus has been forced to change the release date of its new 6T phone after Apple announced it would hold a launch on the same day and in the same place. The 6T will mark a major launch for OnePlus, which is currently trying to push into the mainstream and take on phones like the iPhone. But Apple announced that it would be holding its latest event on 30 October, in New York City. That happened to be the same time and location as the OnePlus event, forcing it to change its schedule. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph.


The Fault in Our Cars

Slate

The first pedestrian killed by a car in the Western Hemisphere was on New York's Upper West Side in 1899. One newspaper warned that "the automobile has tasted blood." Can the reaction to that 1899 pedestrian tragedy help us navigate current arguments about safety, blame, commerce, and public space?


Galaxy Note 9: Samsung unveils 'world's most powerful smartphone'

The Independent - Tech

Samsung has unveiled the Galaxy Note 9, which it describes as "the world's most advanced smartphone." The smartphone-tablet hybrid – often referred to as a'phablet' – features improved battery life, a better camera and increased storage space. A 512GB version, when combined with the external storage, can fold over a terabyte of data – which is more than most modern laptops. Speaking on stage at the Galaxy Unpacked event in Brooklyn, New York, Samsung Mobile president Dong Jin Koh described the Galaxy Note 9 as "the world's most powerful device." The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph.


Subaru channels the iPhone X in 2019 Forester

Mashable

The Japanese automaker unveiled its new 2019 Subaru Forester at the New York International Auto Show on Wednesday. It's largely similar to previous Foresters, but there's one major upgrade: It now has a facial recognition feature. Okay, so it's not quite as sophisticated as the iPhone X's Face ID, which has a 1-in-1 million false acceptance rate and opens the phone like a password. But Subaru's DriverFocus software, which makes its global debut in the 2019 Forester, still has some cool perks. Don't forget your keys, though, because the feature won't open the car or start it for you.


The $1tn question: how far can the new iPhone 8 take Apple?

The Guardian

Apple's stock market value is heading towards a new milestone and its latest product launch on 12 September could push the tech giant closer to becoming the first ever $1tn (£760bn) company. At the end of last week, the company's market capitalisation hovered around $830bn, continuing a 10-year run that has generally headed upwards since a low of $69bn in January 2009, during the financial crisis. Tuesday's event, with the iPhone 8 the star attraction, will strive to meet investors' – and customers' – vaulting expectations. But what will Apple tempt users with to justify Wall Street's faith in its future profits? An Apple spokesman declined to discuss what will be revealed at the event in the company's $5bn, spaceship-shaped Cupertino headquarters.