Ada County


Differentiation key for independent Pyramid Analytics

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While many vendors work toward developing an end-to-end business intelligence platform, Pyramid Analytics already has one. And it's that end-to-end platform -- one that enables users to go from data preparation through discovery, modeling and deployment -- that helps the independent vendor differentiate itself from its many larger, more well-financed peers. Pyramid, founded in 2009 and based in Amsterdam, is an analytics vendor with a platform specializing in what it calls decision intelligence. In addition to its home base, it has offices in London; Seattle; Boise, Idaho; and Tel Aviv, Israel. Pyramid, however, is small compared to many of its competitors.


Experiences in ML Scaling, ML Project Delivery in Healthcare - AI Trends

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Experiences with AI and machine learning at CVS Health and St. Luke's Health System in Boise, Idaho, are having practical benefits to the two organizations. CVS Health is learning how to scale AI applications using machine learning, especially through the house of machine learning operations (MLOps) tools, according to Nels Lindahl, director of Clinical Decision Systems, speaking in a virtual session at the recent Ai4 Conference held virtually recently. And St. Luke's Health Center put a COVID-19 prediction program, a supply chain purchase engine and a demand-based staffing application into initial production using AI and machine learning, said Dr. Justin Smith, senior director of advanced analytics at St. Luke's, also at a recent Ai4 virtual conference session. "We are at an MLOps tipping point, where ML has a growing production footprint, with adoption picking up pace and awareness and understanding at an all-time high," stated Lindahl. "ML tech can now deliver; people are seeing real use cases in the wild and having them grow; it's real."


AI ethics research conference suspends Google sponsorship

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The ACM Conference for Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency (FAccT) has decided to suspend its sponsorship relationship with Google, conference sponsorship co-chair and Boise State University assistant professor Michael Ekstrand confirmed today. The organizers of the AI ethics research conference came to this decision a little over a week after Google fired Ethical AI lead Margaret Mitchell and three months after the firing of Ethical AI co-lead Timnit Gebru. Google has subsequently reorganized about 100 engineers across 10 teams, including placing Ethical AI under the leadership of Google VP Marian Croak. "FAccT is guided by a Strategic Plan, and the conference by-laws charge the Sponsorship Chairs, in collaboration with the Executive Committee, with developing a sponsorship portfolio that aligns with that plan," Ekstrand told VentureBeat in an email. "The Executive Committee made the decision that having Google as a sponsor for the 2021 conference would not be in the best interests of the community and impede the Strategic Plan. We will be revising the sponsorship policy for next year's conference."


Exercise Forging Sabre: Apache, fighter pilots get enemy data faster with help of AI

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BOISE, Idaho: Soaring silently in the sky, the Heron 1 unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) spots three moving vehicles below suspected to be enemy targets. The UAV feeds real-time video back to a big screen in the command post. Commanders there immediately see red rectangles appear around the vehicles. This is the Automatic Target Detection (ATD) system confirming they are threats. Three F-16 fighter jets are scrambled.


Cultural Bias in Artificial Intelligence - The New Stack

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Advertising and white papers may make artificial intelligence seem like a pie in the sky proposition, with easy analysis, deep insights, and fair algorithms available everywhere. The reality, however, is that AI can expose an even darker side of our own humanity, acting as more of a mirror than as sky-pie. We saw this when Microsoft put an AI-driven bot up on Twitter, only to have it spout racist statements shortly thereafter. Camille Eddy, currently a student pursuing a mechanical engineering bachelor's degree at Boise State, already has a long career as a high-tech robotics intern at places like Alphabet and HP. At OSCON, she spoke on the topic of recognizing cultural bias in AI. "Some of the things we've seen are misclassification or misidentification.


How a Boise, Idaho Company Thrives in the Global Chip Business

WIRED

Even if you're not a gadget geek, you likely know whether your laptop is powered by an Intel chip or one from a competitor like AMD. The sticker plastered next to your keyboard won't let you forget. But even if you know your Ryzens from your Ice Lakes, you probably don't put much thought into who makes the memory chips that store your data and keep your laptop and smartphone working. There's a decent chance at least one of your gadgets includes memory made by a company called Micron Technology. Boise, Idaho-based Micron is one of only three outfits that still make DRAM, the chips that provide short-term memory in personal computers, smartphones, tablets, and other devices.


U.S. Defense Budget May Help Fund "Hacking for Defense" Classes at Universities

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

In 2016, Stanford students started hacking for defense--that is, they took on real projects from National Security Agency, the Army, the Navy, the Air Force, the Army Cyber Command, the Veterans Administration, and other agencies with defense-related problems. The students actually came up with prototype solutions. The innovative Hacking For Defense (H4D) class, which requires each student team to conduct at least 100 interviews with defense industry "clients," caught on quickly. Today, according to Steve Blank, an instructor at Stanford and one of the creators of the curriculum, eight universities in addition to Stanford have offered or will offer a Hacking for Defense class this year: Boise State, Columbia, Georgetown, James Madison, the University of California at San Diego, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Southern California, and the University of Southern Mississippi. The class has spun out Hacking for Diplomacy, Hacking for Energy, and other targeted classes that use the same methodology.


U.S. Defense Budget May Help Fund "Hacking for Defense" Classes at Universities

IEEE Spectrum Robotics

In 2016, Stanford students started hacking for defense--that is, they took on real projects from National Security Agency, the Army, the Navy, the Air Force, the Army Cyber Command, the Veterans Administration, and other agencies with defense-related problems. The students actually came up with prototype solutions. The innovative Hacking For Defense (H4D) class, which requires each student team to conduct at least 100 interviews with defense industry "clients," caught on quickly. Today, according to Steve Blank, an instructor at Stanford and one of the creators of the curriculum, eight universities in addition to Stanford have offered or will offer a Hacking for Defense class this year: Boise State, Columbia, Georgetown, James Madison, the University of California at San Diego, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Southern California, and the University of Southern Mississippi. At Stanford, the class has spun out Hacking for Diplomacy, Hacking for Energy, and other targeted classes that use the same methodology.


Is Coeur d'Alene Really "America's Cradle" of A.I.? – The Idea is Less Controversial Than You Might Think. – theKEE.io

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Last year Google recognized Coeur d'Alene as Idaho's eCity (beating out Boise and Moscow), and in a recent article in Chatbots Magazine, journalist Kelly Kissack speculated that the little resort town in the Idaho wilderness might just be the "cradle of civilization for artificial intelligence and robotics" in America. Kissack's piece follows the accomplishments of CDA native, Nick Smoot, and his "Innovation Collective". You can find her article here. It seems, however, that historically there is even more evidence to support Kissack's premise. In fact, a decade and a half earlier, a small Coeur d'Alene startup launched an A.I. that could very well have beaten the Turing test more than ten years before "Eugene" in 2014 -- had it competed.


Defining our relationship with early AI

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Andrew Heikkila is a tech enthusiast and writer from Boise, Idaho. "I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears…in…rain. Time to die." -- Roy Batty, Blade Runner Artificial intelligence has fascinated mankind for more than half a century, with the first public mention of computer intelligence recorded during a London lecture by Alan Turing in 1947.