California


Simplifying Google AI's Best Paper from ICML 2019

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There are only a handful of machine learning conferences in the world that attract the top brains in this field. One such conference, which I am an avid follower of, is the International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML). Folks from top machine learning research companies, like Google AI, Facebook, Uber, etc. come together and present their latest research. It's a conference any data scientist would not want to miss. ICML 2019, held last week in Southern California, USA, saw records tumble in astounding fashion.


Robotic excavators get a boost with $33 million for Built Robotics ZDNet

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When Built Robotics emerged out of stealth in October 2017, the company's self-driving excavators had completed a couple simple projects that included digging and moving dirt at a community garden and a California mountain bike trail. Since then, giant autonomous robots have been deployed on large commercial projects, such as digging the foundations for wind farms. The technology has also expanded to include bulldozers and skid steers, in addition to excavators. Today Built announced a $33 million Series B led by Next47, the new global venture fund backed by Siemens. This brings the company's total funding to $48 million.


Robotic excavators get a boost with $33 million for Built Robotics ZDNet

#artificialintelligence

When Built Robotics emerged out of stealth in October 2017, the company's self-driving excavators had completed a couple simple projects that included digging and moving dirt at a community garden and a California mountain bike trail. Since then, giant autonomous robots have been deployed on large commercial projects, such as digging the foundations for wind farms. The technology has also expanded to include bulldozers and skid steers, in addition to excavators. Today Built announced a $33 million Series B led by Next47, the new global venture fund backed by Siemens. This brings the company's total funding to $48 million.


Oracle Wisely Teams Up With NVIDIA To Tackle Enterprise AI

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The News: Oracle is pushing the envelope on what NVIDIA GPUs can do in the cloud. Find out how, next week at Oracle OpenWorld and Code One in San Francisco, where NVIDIA and Oracle will showcase their growing collaboration to bring AI and GPU-accelerated applications to the enterprise. Integrating CUDA-X libraries into GraalVM applications, enhancing conversational AI with Oracle Digital Assistant, and accelerating data science pipelines through the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Data Science service are a few examples of how enterprise customers and developers worldwide will benefit from GPU-accelerated computing. The companies first teamed up by bringing bare metal GPUs to the public cloud through Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, fueling innovation across a broad range of industries. Engineers, developers, data scientists and researchers are using these instances to power visualization, AI/machine learning, big data, database and HPC workloads.


New AI Face Anonymization Model Protects Privacy

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Was George Orwell right, is Big Brother watching us? Undoubtedly many are alarmed by the ever-increasing level of computer-driven surveillance, particularly involving facial recognition technologies. In the past few months, San Francisco and Oakland, California, and the US state of Massachusetts have all banned police from using facial recognition tech. Meanwhile, in Europe, The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) introduces restrictive rules about privacy preservation in data processing. A team of researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology recently proposed a new architecture that can anonymize faces in images automatically while the original data distribution remains uninterrupted.


Microsoft Teams now supports Oracle digital assistant

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Oracle's digital assistant is now available in Microsoft Teams, the cloud hosting and services provider announced today. Oracle's AI assistant got several other updates today, including the ability to interact via voice commands, enterprise-grade security for voice recordings, and the ability to respond to more complex voice commands. The news was announced today at Oracle's OpenWorld conference in San Francisco. As part of the Microsoft Teams integration, Microsoft Teams and Office 365 users will be able to access Oracle enterprise bots from the Microsoft Teams App Store. "For enterprise customers, what we're enabling [them] to do now is they can easily try to use Microsoft Teams to collaborate with their employees and colleagues and so forth with Microsoft Teams," Oracle VP of AI and digital assistant Suhas Uliyar told VentureBeat in a phone interview.


5 simple rules to make AI a force for good

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Consumers and activists are rebelling against Silicon Valley titans, and all levels of government are probing how they operate. Much of the concern is over vast quantities of data that tech companies gather--with and without our consent--to fuel artificial intelligence models that increasingly shape what we see and influence how we act. If "data is the new oil," as boosters of the AI industry like to say, then scandal-challenged data companies like Amazon, Facebook, and Google may face the same mistrust as oil companies like BP and Chevron. Vast computing facilities refine crude data into valuable distillates like targeted advertising and product recommendations. But burning data pollutes as well, with faulty algorithms that make judgments on who can get a loan, who gets hired and fired, even who goes to jail.


Machine learning predicts how big wildfires will get - Futurity

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You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license. A new technique can predict the final size of wildfires from the moment of ignition, researchers report. Built around a machine learning algorithm, the model can help forecast whether a wildfire will be small, medium, or large by the time it has run its course--knowledge useful to those in charge of allocating scarce firefighting resources. "A useful analogy is to consider what makes something go viral in social media," says lead author Shane Coffield, a doctoral student in earth system science at the University of California, Irvine. "We can think about what properties of a specific tweet or post might make it blow up and become really popular--and how you might predict that at the moment it's posted or right before it's posted."


You should be skeptical when it comes to hyped-up AI. Here's why.

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To find out what's behind the phenomenon of super-agers, researchers conducted a study examining the brains and cognitive performances of two groups: 41 young adults between the ages of 18 and 35 and 40 older adults between the ages of 60 and 80. First, the researchers administered a series of cognitive tests, like the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) and the Trail Making Test (TMT). Seventeen members of the older group scored at or above the mean scores of the younger group. That is, these 17 could be considered super-agers, performing at the same level as the younger study participants. Aside from these individuals, members of the older group tended to perform less well on the cognitive tests. The default mode network is, as its name might suggest, a series of brain regions that are active by default -- when we're not engaged in a task, they tend to show higher levels of activity.


How this 11-year-old entrepreneur is helping kids learn AI concepts and coding with CoderBunnyz

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A Class 6 student, Samaira Mehta already seems to be on top of her game. Of Indian origin and based in California, this 11-year-old girl in tech is an inventor, and has invented CoderBunnyz, a STEM coding board game to teach coding to kids between the age group of four and 10. Samaira has taken Silicon Valley by storm and has been a part of more than 50 conferences. She has held 60 workshops that spotlight her board game, and taught over 2,000 kids, including over 50 "Google kids" at Googleplex, Google's headquarters in Mountain View. The young girl also received a letter from the White House, from then First Lady Michelle Obama, for her work.