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TuSimple Maxes Out Robot Truck Fleet To Keep Freight Moving During Coronavirus Crisis

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San Diego-based TuSimple, which operates a separate unit in China, has 40 18-wheelers operating out of its depot in Tucson, Arizona, and is "essentially running 24/7" carrying loads between Phoenix and El Paso, Texas, chief product officer Chuck Price tells Forbes. It's a tiny freight operation compared to the massive fleets of national haulers like J.B. Hunt, Swift, Werner and Amazon AMZN, each with thousands of trucks and drivers, but no company has more self-driving semis than TuSimple, based on U.S. Transportation Department registry data.


John Zimmer, Tony Fernandes: Charting the future of transportation

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Those were some of the questions posed by John Zimmer, president and co-founder of U.S. rideshare firm Lyft, at the recent Rakuten Optimism 2019 conference in Yokohama, Japan. Lyft became the first ridesharing company to go public earlier this year when it completed an IPO with a valuation of $24 billion. It has also been pursuing autonomous driving technology: in partnership with Aptiv, Lyft recently notched 50,000 rides in Las Vegas in just a year, and has recently launched Waymo autonomous vehicles on the Lyft platform in Phoenix, Arizona. Against that background, Zimmer spoke about the future of transport with Mickey Mikitani, CEO of early Lyft investor, Rakuten. "We have to think about what is the right infrastructure to support (the future of transport)," Zimmer said during his second appearance at Optimism since speaking at the inaugural conference last year in San Francisco.


Could the Rise of AI Put Truckers' Jobs in Peril? "In the Age of AI" FRONTLINE

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Self-driving trucks may have once seemed like a futuristic vision. But in recent years, they've begun taking to the road -- and their implications for the labor market, and long-haul truck drivers in particular, could be enormous. In the above excerpt from the new FRONTLINE documentary "In the Age of AI," meet the 24-year-old CEO of a self-driving truck company whose vehicles are already delivering freight from California to Arizona; an independent trucker and his wife whose livelihood could be threatened by the new tech; and a sociologist and author who's been studying the forces reshaping the trucking industry. Find us on the PBS Video App, where there are more than 250 FRONTLINE documentaries available for you to watch any time: https://to.pbs.org/FLVideoApp Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.


Could the Rise of Artificial Intelligence Put Truckers' Jobs in Peril?

#artificialintelligence

Self-driving trucks may have once seemed like a futuristic vision. But in recent years, they've begun taking to the road -- and their implications for the labor market, and long-haul truck drivers in particular, could be enormous. In the above excerpt from the new FRONTLINE documentary In the Age of AI, meet the young CEO of a self-driving truck company whose vehicles are already delivering freight from California to Arizona; an independent trucker and his wife whose livelihood could be threatened by the new tech; and a sociologist and author who's been studying the forces reshaping the trucking industry. Among them: the rise in automation, some forms of which are powered by AI -- including self-driving trucks. "The trucking industry is $740 billion a year … in many of these operations, labor's a third of that cost," Steve Viscelli, author of The Big Rig, tells FRONTLINE in the above excerpt from the film.


Waymo Shares Autonomous Vehicle Dataset for Machine Learning

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Waymo, the self-driving technology company owned by Google's parent company, Alphabet, released a dataset containing sensor data collected by their autonomous vehicles during more than five hours of driving. The set contains high-resolution data from lidar and camera sensors collected in several urban and suburban environments in a wide variety of driving conditions, and includes labels for vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists, and signage. The Waymo team announced the release of the Waymo Open Dataset in a blog post, describing it as "one of the largest, richest, and most diverse self-driving datasets ever released for research." The data was collected by Waymo's vehicles operating in the USA in Phoenix, AZ, Kirkland, WA, Mountain View, CA and San Francisco, CA, at various times of day and night, and in good and bad weather. The dataset consists of 1,000 segments of 20 seconds each, collected at 10Hz (i.e., 200,000 frames) which contain: Waymo also released a Google Colab notebook containing tutorials and a GitHub repository containing TensorFlow helper-code for building models.


Will driverless cars cause havoc on Britain's roads? Telegraph readers share their views

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How will driverless cars, tested on the reliable roads of California and Arizona, cope with the narrow lanes, roundabouts and left-sided driving of Britain? They will certainly have to adapt if they're to become the global phenomenon that companies including Uber have promised is on its way, wrote technology reporter Olivia Rudgard on Wednesday. Take, for example, the many minor UK roads that don't have white lines, which driverless cars rely on to know which lane they should be in and how to position themselves. She offered four other reasons why autonomous vehicles could cause havoc on roads this side of the pond, and asked Telegraph readers for their views on whether this innovation will be...


Self-driving cars must be experts on ridiculously specific road rules

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If you're driving in San Francisco one week and then New York City the next, you're probably not paying attention to the small differences in rules when it comes to sharing bikes lanes, passing school buses, and turning right on red. If you're in a self-driving car, those state-by-state distinctions aren't just a nuisance (and potential ticket since ignorance isn't a legal defense), but rules the self-driving companies don't want to overlook, no matter how tedious. The software controlling the car needs to have those slight variations in traffic law programmed in, especially since companies don't want negative media attention or a blemished record showing it broke the law. Self-driving technology company Aurora looked into regulations for autonomous vehicles (known as AVs) across 29 states and found that they can vary. California has one set of testing rules, while other AV-friendly states like Texas and Arizona have others.


Driverless Delivery Vans Are Here as Production Begins in China

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The future of deliveries may be robo-vans. A Chinese startup called Neolix kicked off mass production of its self-driving delivery vehicles Friday -- saying it's the first company globally to do so -- and has lined up giants such as JD.Com Inc. and Huawei Technologies Co. as customers. Neolix expects to deliver a thousand of the vehicles, which resemble tiny vans, within the first year as it broadens out. The implications are potentially huge: Billionaire Jack Ma predicts there will be 1 billion deliveries a day in China within a decade and the commercialization of the technology could provide lessons for autonomous vehicles carrying passengers. Neolix isn't alone in this space as Silicon Valley's Nuro raised almost a billion dollars this year and is starting to deliver groceries in Arizona.


Delivery by robot soon to be reality in China as startup Neolix begins mass production of 'robovans'

The Japan Times

The future of deliveries may be "robovans." A Chinese startup called Neolix kicked off mass production of its self-driving delivery vehicles Friday -- saying it's the first company globally to do so -- and has lined up giants such as JD.com Inc. and Huawei Technologies Co. as customers. Neolix expects to deliver a thousand of the vehicles, which resemble tiny vans, within the first year as it broadens out. The implications are potentially huge: Billionaire Jack Ma predicts there will be 1 billion deliveries a day in China within a decade and the commercialization of the technology could provide lessons for autonomous vehicles carrying passengers. Neolix isn't alone in this space as Silicon Valley's Nuro raised almost $1 billion this year and is starting to deliver groceries in Arizona.


Why Cars Aren't the Real Stars of the Autonomous Revolution

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Driverless car startups are booming these days, many with rock-star valuations. Automakers also now talk about rolling out autonomous taxi services by 2019, but here's a quick reality check: By some estimates, we're still 15 years away from truly autonomous vehicles being available to the general public, once you consider the complications of regulation, insurance and the critical last-mile challenges of human safety. For example, carmakers and autonomous startups have to date not agreed on any sort of data-sharing system to allow vehicles to talk to one another, a mandatory step prior to unleashing full autonomy in passenger vehicles. The Uber self-driving car fatality in Arizona in the spring of 2018 further illustrates that driverless cars remain a work in progress. The economic need or demand for driverless cars also remains unclear.