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IBM and AMD Begin Cooperation on Cybersecurity and AI

#artificialintelligence

International Business Machines (IBM) - Get Report and Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) - Get Report said they began a development program focused on cybersecurity and artificial intelligence. The development agreement will build on "open-source software, open standards, and open system architectures to drive confidential computing in hybrid cloud environments," the companies said in a statement. The agreement also will "support a broad range of accelerators across high-performance computing and enterprise critical capabilities, such as virtualization and encryption," they said. AMD, Santa Clara, Calif., is one of the world's biggest chipmakers and is thriving. IBM, the storied Armonk, N.Y., technology services company, has struggled to regain the glory of its past, when it led the computer-making industry.


6 Privacy Solutions for Big Data and Machine Learning

#artificialintelligence

Travelers who wander the banana pancake trail through Southeast Asia will all get roughly the same experience. They'll eat crummy food on one of fifty boats floating around Halong Bay, then head up to the highlands of Sapa for a faux cultural experience with hill tribes that grow dreadful cannabis. After that, it's on to Laos to float the river in Vang Vien while smashed on opium tea. Eventually, you'll see someone wearing a t-shirt with the classic slogan – "same same, but different." The origins of this phrase surround the Southeast Asian vendors who often respond to queries about the authenticity of fake goods they're selling with "same same, but different." It's a phrase that appropriately describes how the technology world loves to spin things as fresh and new when they've hardly changed at all.


6 Privacy Solutions for Big Data and Machine Learning

#artificialintelligence

Travelers who wander the banana pancake trail through Southeast Asia will all get roughly the same experience. They'll eat crummy food on one of fifty boats floating around Ha Long Bay, then head up to the highlands of Sa Pa for a faux cultural experience with hill tribes that grow dreadful cannabis. After that, it's on to Laos to float the river in Vang Vieng while smashed on opium tea. Eventually, you'll see someone wearing a t-shirt with the classic slogan – "same same, but different." The origins of this phrase surround the Southeast Asian vendors who often respond to queries about the authenticity of fake goods they're selling with "same same, but different." It's a phrase that appropriately describes how the technology world loves to spin things as fresh and new when they've hardly changed at all.


How Might Artificial Intelligence Applications Impact Risk Management?

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) applications have attracted considerable ethical attention for good reasons. Although AI models might advance human welfare in unprecedented ways, progress will not occur without substantial risks. This article considers 3 such risks: system malfunctions, privacy protections, and consent to data repurposing. To meet these challenges, traditional risk managers will likely need to collaborate intensively with computer scientists, bioinformaticists, information technologists, and data privacy and security experts. This essay will speculate on the degree to which these AI risks might be embraced or dismissed by risk management.


Does Palantir See Too Much?

#artificialintelligence

On a bright Tuesday afternoon in Paris last fall, Alex Karp was doing tai chi in the Luxembourg Gardens. He wore blue Nike sweatpants, a blue polo shirt, orange socks, charcoal-gray sneakers and white-framed sunglasses with red accents that inevitably drew attention to his most distinctive feature, a tangle of salt-and-pepper hair rising skyward from his head. Under a canopy of chestnut trees, Karp executed a series of elegant tai chi and qigong moves, shifting the pebbles and dirt gently under his feet as he twisted and turned. A group of teenagers watched in amusement. After 10 minutes or so, Karp walked to a nearby bench, where one of his bodyguards had placed a cooler and what looked like an instrument case. The cooler held several bottles of the nonalcoholic German beer that Karp drinks (he would crack one open on the way out of the park). The case contained a wooden sword, which he needed for the next part of his routine. "I brought a real sword the last time I was here, but the police stopped me," he said matter of factly as he began slashing the air with the sword. Those gendarmes evidently didn't know that Karp, far from being a public menace, was the chief executive of an American company whose software has been deployed on behalf of public safety in France. The company, Palantir Technologies, is named after the seeing stones in J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings." Its two primary software programs, Gotham and Foundry, gather and process vast quantities of data in order to identify connections, patterns and trends that might elude human analysts. The stated goal of all this "data integration" is to help organizations make better decisions, and many of Palantir's customers consider its technology to be transformative. Karp claims a loftier ambition, however. "We built our company to support the West," he says. To that end, Palantir says it does not do business in countries that it considers adversarial to the U.S. and its allies, namely China and Russia. In the company's early days, Palantir employees, invoking Tolkien, described their mission as "saving the shire." The brainchild of Karp's friend and law-school classmate Peter Thiel, Palantir was founded in 2003. It was seeded in part by In-Q-Tel, the C.I.A.'s venture-capital arm, and the C.I.A. remains a client. Palantir's technology is rumored to have been used to track down Osama bin Laden -- a claim that has never been verified but one that has conferred an enduring mystique on the company. These days, Palantir is used for counterterrorism by a number of Western governments.


Using Data and Respecting Users

Communications of the ACM

Transaction data is like a friendship tie: both parties must respect the relationship and if one party exploits it the relationship sours. As data becomes increasingly valuable, firms must take care not to exploit their users or they will sour their ties. Ethical uses of data cover a spectrum: at one end, using patient data in healthcare to cure patients is little cause for concern. At the other end, selling data to third parties who exploit users is serious cause for concern.2 Between these two extremes lies a vast gray area where firms need better ways to frame data risks and rewards in order to make better legal and ethical choices.


Artificial Intelligence: Your Data Guardian - Data Guard 365

#artificialintelligence

Businesses of every variety and every industry are facing a constant attack by black hats trying to storm their digital fences and jeopardize their network integrity. Rarely a day goes by that the headlines are not filled with at least one story of another global conglomerate suffering under the weight of an all-out attack on their data and networks. Suffice it to say, if the largest and most technologically advanced organizations in the world still fall victim to these threats, every business with any sort of digital footprint is susceptible. That is not to say that your business, no matter its size or industry, is a proverbial sitting duck to the clever and relentless black hats of the world. In fact, with some deliberate planning and a well-organized game plan, companies can efficiently and effectively defend themselves and their data from intrusion.


Eight Lincoln Laboratory technologies named 2020 R&D 100 Award winners

#artificialintelligence

Eight technologies developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory researchers, either wholly or in collaboration with researchers from other organizations, were among the winners of the 2020 R&D 100 Awards. Annually since 1963, these international R&D awards recognize 100 technologies that a panel of expert judges selects as the most revolutionary of the past year. Six of the laboratory's winning technologies are software systems, a number of which take advantage of artificial intelligence techniques. The software technologies are solutions to difficulties inherent in analyzing large volumes of data and to problems in maintaining cybersecurity. Another technology is a process designed to assure secure fabrication of integrated circuits, and the eighth winner is an optical communications technology that may enable future space missions to transmit error-free data to Earth at significantly higher rates than currently possible.


Hitting the Books: The latest 'Little Brother' is a stark cybersecurity thriller

Engadget

Back in 2008, New York Times best-selling author and Boing Boing alum, Cory Doctorow introduced Markus "w1n5t0n" Yallow to the world in the original Little Brother (which you can still read for free right here). The story follows the talented teenage computer prodigy's exploits after he and his friends find themselves caught in the aftermath of a terrorist bombing of the Bay Bridge. They must outwit and out-hack the DHS, which has turned San Francisco into a police state. Its sequel, Homeland, catches up with Yallow a few years down the line as he faces an impossible choice between behaving as the heroic hacker his friends see him as and toeing the company line. The third installment, Attack Surface, is a standalone story set in the Little Brother universe. It follows Yallow's archrival, Masha Maximow, an equally talented hacker who finds herself working as a counterterrorism expert for a multinational security firm. By day, she enables tin-pot dictators around the world to repress and surveil their citizens.


Twitter Data-Breach Case Won't Be Resolved Before Year's End, Ireland's Regulator Says

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

Helen Dixon, head of Ireland's Data Protection Commission, in May submitted a draft decision to more than two dozen of the bloc's privacy regulators for review, as required under the law. Eleven regulators objected to the proposed ruling, sparking a lengthy dispute-resolution mechanism, she said. The contents of the draft decision haven't been disclosed. Twitter's European operations are based in Dublin. "It's a long process," Ms. Dixon said at The Wall Street Journal's virtual CIO Network conference.