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How Online Privacy Issues Will Shape Future Use Of Artificial Intelligence In Advertising

#artificialintelligence

Privacy restrictions are pushing many marketer toward the use of artificial intelligence in order to ... [ ] delive more targeted messages. The trend toward greater focus on privacy issues has been going on for some time and is starting to come to a head. More restrictions on the sharing and merging of data on individuals has been leading to advertisers to look for effective ways to target and reach consumers, including using the use of behavioral targeting supplemented by the use of artificial intelligence (AI). At a time when privacy regulations are sometimes fragmented and confusing but changing, it is critically important for marketers to monitor changes in the regulatory environment. Against this backdrop, I interviewed Sheri Bachstein, IBM's Global Head of Watson Advertising to get her insights and predictions on the future of privacy regulation and how it will affect advertisers, particularly as regards the use of AI and came away with three major takeaways: The European Union's General Data Protection Regulation and the California Consumer Privacy Act are already leading to the devaluation of traditional third-party cookies and the way many advertisers do business.


Council Post: Future Focused: The 2021 Cybersecurity Landscape

#artificialintelligence

Paul Lipman has worked in cybersecurity for 10-plus years. The onset of Covid-19 necessitated a work-from-home environment on an unprecedented scale. Large and small companies raced to reframe and reevaluate cybersecurity measures within a massive BYOD environment and amid increased Covid-19-related phishing scams and cyberattacks like the recent ransomware attacks against the Clark County School District (CCSD) in Las Vegas and United Health Services. Regulations like GDPR and CCPA helped make the collection of consumer data and privacy a matter of law instead of just good practice. However, consumers remain skeptical of businesses that continue to put profit ahead of privacy after breaches, like Facebook, TikTok and YouTube.


The SolarWinds Body Count Now Includes NASA and the FAA

#artificialintelligence

Some blasts from the past surfaced this week, including revelations that a Russia-linked hacking group has repeatedly targeted the US electrical grid, along with oil and gas utilities and other industrial firms. Notably, the group has ties to the notorious industrial-control GRU hacking group Sandworm. Meanwhile, researchers revealed evidence this week that an elite NSA hacking tool for Microsoft Windows, known as EpMe, fell into the hands of Chinese hackers in 2014, years before that same tool then leaked in the notorious Shadow Brokers dump of NSA tools. WIRED got an inside look at how the video game hacker Empress has become so powerful and skilled at cracking the digital rights management software that lets video game makers, ebook publishers, and others control the content you buy from them. And the increasingly popular, but still invite-only, audio-based social media platform Clubhouse continues to struggle with security and privacy missteps. If you want something relaxing to take your mind off all of this complicated and concerning news, though, check out the new generation of Opte, an art piece that depicts the evolution and growth of the internet from 1997 to today.


The SolarWinds Body Count Now Includes NASA and the FAA

WIRED

Some blasts from the past surfaced this week, including revelations that a Russia-linked hacking group has repeatedly targeted the US electrical grid, along with oil and gas utilities and other industrial firms. Notably, the group has ties to the notorious industrial-control GRU hacking group Sandworm. Meanwhile, researchers revealed evidence this week that an elite NSA hacking tool for Microsoft Windows, known as EpMe, fell into the hands of Chinese hackers in 2014, years before that same tool then leaked in the notorious Shadow Brokers dump of NSA tools. WIRED got an inside look at how the video game hacker Empress has become so powerful and skilled at cracking the digital rights management software that lets video game makers, ebook publishers, and others control the content you buy from them. And the increasingly popular, but still invite-only, audio-based social media platform Clubhouse continues to struggle with security and privacy missteps. If you want something relaxing to take your mind off all of this complicated and concerning news, though, check out the new generation of Opte, an art piece that depicts the evolution and growth of the internet from 1997 to today.


The Morning After: 'Cyberpunk 2077' runs into another delay

Engadget

Cyberpunk 2077's woes have continued long after the game launched, with all the issues that entailed. CD Projekt Red announced yesterday that we'll have to wait until the second half of March for the next big patch. The developer cited that recent ransomware hack as the major culprit -- it initially planned to launch the 1.2 patch in February. As you're probably aware, February ends this week. The news is especially frustrating for PS5 owners as the game hasn't returned to the PlayStation Store since it was pulled.


Clearview AI Raises Disquiet at Privacy Regulators

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The data protection authority in Hamburg, Germany, for instance, last week issued a preliminary order saying New York-based Clearview must delete biometric data related to Matthias Marx, a 32-year-old doctoral student. The regulator ordered the company to delete biometric hashes, or bits of code, used to identify photos of Mr. Marx's face, and gave it till Feb. 12 to comply. Not all photos, however, are considered sensitive biometric data under the European Union's 2018 General Data Protection Regulation. The action in Germany is only one of many investigations, lawsuits and regulatory reprimands that Clearview is facing in jurisdictions around the world. On Wednesday, Canadian privacy authorities called the company's practices a form of "mass identification and surveillance" that violated the country's privacy laws.


Differential Privacy

Communications of the ACM

Over the past decade, calls for better measures to protect sensitive, personally identifiable information have blossomed into what politicians like to call a "hot-button issue." Certainly, privacy violations have become rampant and people have grown keenly aware of just how vulnerable they are. When it comes to potential remedies, however, proposals have varied widely, leading to bitter, politically charged arguments. To date, what has chiefly come of that have been bureaucratic policies that satisfy almost no one--and infuriate many. Now, into this muddled picture comes differential privacy. First formalized in 2006, it's an approach based on a mathematically rigorous definition of privacy that allows formalization and proof of the guarantees against re-identification offered by a system. While differential privacy has been accepted by theorists for some time, its implementation has turned out to be subtle and tricky, with practical applications only now starting to become available. To date, differential privacy has been adopted by the U.S. Census Bureau, along with a number of technology companies, but what this means and how these organizations have implemented their systems remains a mystery to many. It's also unlikely that the emergence of differential privacy signals an end to all the difficult decisions and trade-offs, but it does signify that there now are measures of privacy that can be quantified and reasoned about--and then used to apply suitable privacy protections. A milestone in the effort to make this capability generally available came in September 2019 when Google released an open source version of the differential privacy library that the company has used with many of its core products. In the exchange that follows, two of the people at Google who were central to the effort to release the library as open source--Damien Desfontaines, privacy software engineer; and Miguel Guevara, who leads Google's differential privacy product development effort--reflect on the engineering challenges that lie ahead, as well as what remains to be done to achieve their ultimate goal of providing privacy protection by default.


The Role AI Plays in Safeguarding Government Data

#artificialintelligence

The U.S. government is tasked with protecting classified data and combating potential threats, an area of growing concern with the increasing use of web-based applications required for remote working. Due to high demands, the teams tasked with safeguarding data need a new way--or new capabilities--to scale cybersecurity efforts, especially as many government agencies also face the challenge of limited resources and massively growing data sets and feeds. Pushed by the pandemic, governments are accelerating digital transformation efforts to implement artificial intelligence for cybersecurity needs, as it brings capabilities beyond what manual human surveillance can provide. In fact, the Defense Department's investment in AI has increased from $600 million in fiscal 2016 to $2.5 billion in fiscal 2021. The security operations center is the "mothership" of security within government agencies.


Trump made a mess of tech policy. Here's what Biden is inheriting.

Mashable

It's hard to focus on the nitty gritty of tech policy when the world is on fire. Take, for example, his fight against Big Tech in the name of "anti-conservative bias" (no, it doesn't exist), which resulted in an assault on Section 230. Experts say the true aim of those efforts was to undermine content moderation, and normalize the white supremacist attitudes that helped put people like Trump in power. Unfortunately, those allegations will have life for years to come as a form of "zombie Trumpism," as Berin Szoka, a senior fellow at the technology policy organization TechFreedom, put it. Trump may be gone from office and Twitter.


privacy?

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

DuckDuckGo, a search engine focused on privacy, increased its average number of daily searches by 62% in 2020 as users seek alternatives to impede data tracking. The search engine, founded in 2008, operated nearly 23.7 billion search queries on their platform in 2020, according to their traffic page. On Jan. 11, DuckDuckGo reached its highest number of search queries in one day, with a total of 102,251,307. DuckDuckGo does not track user searches or share personal data with third-party companies. "People are coming to us because they want more privacy, and it's generally spreading through word of mouth," Kamyl Bazbaz, DuckDuckGo vice president of communications, told USA TODAY.