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Learning Graph Cellular Automata

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Cellular automata (CA) are a class of computational models that exhibit rich dynamics emerging from the local interaction of cells arranged in a regular lattice. In this work we focus on a generalised version of typical CA, called graph cellular automata (GCA), in which the lattice structure is replaced by an arbitrary graph. In particular, we extend previous work that used convolutional neural networks to learn the transition rule of conventional CA and we use graph neural networks to learn a variety of transition rules for GCA. First, we present a general-purpose architecture for learning GCA, and we show that it can represent any arbitrary GCA with finite and discrete state space. Then, we test our approach on three different tasks: 1) learning the transition rule of a GCA on a Voronoi tessellation; 2) imitating the behaviour of a group of flocking agents; 3) learning a rule that converges to a desired target state.


Illuminating Diverse Neural Cellular Automata for Level Generation

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We present a method of generating a collection of neural cellular automata (NCA) to design video game levels. While NCAs have so far only been trained via supervised learning, we present a quality diversity (QD) approach to generating a collection of NCA level generators. By framing the problem as a QD problem, our approach can train diverse level generators, whose output levels vary based on aesthetic or functional criteria. To efficiently generate NCAs, we train generators via Covariance Matrix Adaptation MAP-Elites (CMA-ME), a quality diversity algorithm which specializes in continuous search spaces. We apply our new method to generate level generators for several 2D tile-based games: a maze game, Sokoban, and Zelda. Our results show that CMA-ME can generate small NCAs that are diverse yet capable, often satisfying complex solvability criteria for deterministic agents. We compare against a Compositional Pattern-Producing Network (CPPN) baseline trained to produce diverse collections of generators and show that the NCA representation yields a better exploration of level-space.


Intelligent Building Control Systems for Thermal Comfort and Energy-Efficiency: A Systematic Review of Artificial Intelligence-Assisted Techniques

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Building operations represent a significant percentage of the total primary energy consumed in most countries due to the proliferation of Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) installations in response to the growing demand for improved thermal comfort. Reducing the associated energy consumption while maintaining comfortable conditions in buildings are conflicting objectives and represent a typical optimization problem that requires intelligent system design. Over the last decade, different methodologies based on the Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques have been deployed to find the sweet spot between energy use in HVAC systems and suitable indoor comfort levels to the occupants. This paper performs a comprehensive and an in-depth systematic review of AI-based techniques used for building control systems by assessing the outputs of these techniques, and their implementations in the reviewed works, as well as investigating their abilities to improve the energy-efficiency, while maintaining thermal comfort conditions. This enables a holistic view of (1) the complexities of delivering thermal comfort to users inside buildings in an energy-efficient way, and (2) the associated bibliographic material to assist researchers and experts in the field in tackling such a challenge. Among the 20 AI tools developed for both energy consumption and comfort control, functions such as identification and recognition patterns, optimization, predictive control. Based on the findings of this work, the application of AI technology in building control is a promising area of research and still an ongoing, i.e., the performance of AI-based control is not yet completely satisfactory. This is mainly due in part to the fact that these algorithms usually need a large amount of high-quality real-world data, which is lacking in the building or, more precisely, the energy sector.


Adversarially-learned Inference via an Ensemble of Discrete Undirected Graphical Models

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Undirected graphical models are compact representations of joint probability distributions over random variables. To solve inference tasks of interest, graphical models of arbitrary topology can be trained using empirical risk minimization. However, to solve inference tasks that were not seen during training, these models (EGMs) often need to be re-trained. Instead, we propose an inference-agnostic adversarial training framework which produces an infinitely-large ensemble of graphical models (AGMs). The ensemble is optimized to generate data within the GAN framework, and inference is performed using a finite subset of these models. AGMs perform comparably with EGMs on inference tasks that the latter were specifically optimized for. Most importantly, AGMs show significantly better generalization to unseen inference tasks compared to EGMs, as well as deep neural architectures like GibbsNet and VAEAC which allow arbitrary conditioning. Finally, AGMs allow fast data sampling, competitive with Gibbs sampling from EGMs.


State of AI Report 2019

#artificialintelligence

We believe that AI will be a force multiplier on technological progress in our increasingly digital, data-driven world. This is because everything around us today, ranging from culture to consumer products, is a product of intelligence. In this report, we set out to capture a snapshot of the exponential progress in AI with a focus on developments in the past 12 months. Consider this report as a compilation of the most interesting things we've seen with a goal of triggering an informed conversation about the state of AI and its implication for the future. This edition builds on the inaugural State of AI Report 2018, which can be found here: www.stateof.ai/2018 We consider the following key dimensions in our report: - Research: Technology breakthroughs and their capabilities.


Routing Networks and the Challenges of Modular and Compositional Computation

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Compositionality is a key strategy for addressing combinatorial complexity and the curse of dimensionality. Recent work has shown that compositional solutions can be learned and offer substantial gains across a variety of domains, including multi-task learning, language modeling, visual question answering, machine comprehension, and others. However, such models present unique challenges during training when both the module parameters and their composition must be learned jointly. In this paper, we identify several of these issues and analyze their underlying causes. Our discussion focuses on routing networks, a general approach to this problem, and examines empirically the interplay of these challenges and a variety of design decisions. In particular, we consider the effect of how the algorithm decides on module composition, how the algorithm updates the modules, and if the algorithm uses regularization.