Goto

Collaborating Authors

Results


SpeechBrain: A General-Purpose Speech Toolkit

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

SpeechBrain is an open-source and all-in-one speech toolkit. It is designed to facilitate the research and development of neural speech processing technologies by being simple, flexible, user-friendly, and well-documented. This paper describes the core architecture designed to support several tasks of common interest, allowing users to naturally conceive, compare and share novel speech processing pipelines. SpeechBrain achieves competitive or state-of-the-art performance in a wide range of speech benchmarks. It also provides training recipes, pretrained models, and inference scripts for popular speech datasets, as well as tutorials which allow anyone with basic Python proficiency to familiarize themselves with speech technologies.


A Comprehensive Assessment of Dialog Evaluation Metrics

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Automatic evaluation metrics are a crucial component of dialog systems research. Standard language evaluation metrics are known to be ineffective for evaluating dialog. As such, recent research has proposed a number of novel, dialog-specific metrics that correlate better with human judgements. Due to the fast pace of research, many of these metrics have been assessed on different datasets and there has as yet been no time for a systematic comparison between them. To this end, this paper provides a comprehensive assessment of recently proposed dialog evaluation metrics on a number of datasets. In this paper, 17 different automatic evaluation metrics are evaluated on 10 different datasets. Furthermore, the metrics are assessed in different settings, to better qualify their respective strengths and weaknesses. Metrics are assessed (1) on both the turn level and the dialog level, (2) for different dialog lengths, (3) for different dialog qualities (e.g., coherence, engaging), (4) for different types of response generation models (i.e., generative, retrieval, simple models and state-of-the-art models), (5) taking into account the similarity of different metrics and (6) exploring combinations of different metrics. This comprehensive assessment offers several takeaways pertaining to dialog evaluation metrics in general. It also suggests how to best assess evaluation metrics and indicates promising directions for future work.


Conversations Are Not Flat: Modeling the Dynamic Information Flow across Dialogue Utterances

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Nowadays, open-domain dialogue models can generate acceptable responses according to the historical context based on the large-scale pre-trained language models. However, they generally concatenate the dialogue history directly as the model input to predict the response, which we named as the flat pattern and ignores the dynamic information flow across dialogue utterances. In this work, we propose the DialoFlow model, in which we introduce a dynamic flow mechanism to model the context flow, and design three training objectives to capture the information dynamics across dialogue utterances by addressing the semantic influence brought about by each utterance in large-scale pre-training. Experiments on the multi-reference Reddit Dataset and DailyDialog Dataset demonstrate that our DialoFlow significantly outperforms the DialoGPT on the dialogue generation task. Besides, we propose the Flow score, an effective automatic metric for evaluating interactive human-bot conversation quality based on the pre-trained DialoFlow, which presents high chatbot-level correlation ($r=0.9$) with human ratings among 11 chatbots. Code and pre-trained models will be public. \footnote{\url{https://github.com/ictnlp/DialoFlow}}


Data-Driven Design-by-Analogy: State of the Art and Future Directions

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Design-by-Analogy (DbA) is a design methodology, wherein new solutions are generated in a target domain based on inspiration drawn from a source domain through cross-domain analogical reasoning [1, 2, 3]. DbA is an active research area in engineering design and various methods and tools have been proposed to support the implement of its process [4, 5, 6, 7, 8]. Studies have shown that DbA can help designers mitigate design fixation [9] and improve design ideation outcomes [10]. Fig.1 presents an example of DbA applications [11]. This case aims to solve an engineering design problem: How might we rectify the loud sonic boom generated when trains travel at high speeds through tunnels in atmospheric conditions [11, 12]? For potential design solutions to this problem, engineers explored structures in other design fields than trains or in the nature that effectively "break" the sonic-boom effect. When looking into the nature, engineers discovered that kingfisher birds could slice through the air and dive into the water at extremely high speeds to catch prey while barely making a splash. By analogy, engineers re-designed the train's front-end nose to mimic the geometry of the kingfisher's beak. This analogical design reduced noise and eliminated tunnel booms.


CEREC: A Corpus for Entity Resolution in Email Conversations

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

We present the first large scale corpus for entity resolution in email conversations (CEREC). The corpus consists of 6001 email threads from the Enron Email Corpus containing 36,448 email messages and 60,383 entity coreference chains. The annotation is carried out as a two-step process with minimal manual effort. Experiments are carried out for evaluating different features and performance of four baselines on the created corpus. For the task of mention identification and coreference resolution, a best performance of 59.2 F1 is reported, highlighting the room for improvement. An in-depth qualitative and quantitative error analysis is presented to understand the limitations of the baselines considered.


Pervasive AI for IoT Applications: Resource-efficient Distributed Artificial Intelligence

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) has witnessed a substantial breakthrough in a variety of Internet of Things (IoT) applications and services, spanning from recommendation systems to robotics control and military surveillance. This is driven by the easier access to sensory data and the enormous scale of pervasive/ubiquitous devices that generate zettabytes (ZB) of real-time data streams. Designing accurate models using such data streams, to predict future insights and revolutionize the decision-taking process, inaugurates pervasive systems as a worthy paradigm for a better quality-of-life. The confluence of pervasive computing and artificial intelligence, Pervasive AI, expanded the role of ubiquitous IoT systems from mainly data collection to executing distributed computations with a promising alternative to centralized learning, presenting various challenges. In this context, a wise cooperation and resource scheduling should be envisaged among IoT devices (e.g., smartphones, smart vehicles) and infrastructure (e.g. edge nodes, and base stations) to avoid communication and computation overheads and ensure maximum performance. In this paper, we conduct a comprehensive survey of the recent techniques developed to overcome these resource challenges in pervasive AI systems. Specifically, we first present an overview of the pervasive computing, its architecture, and its intersection with artificial intelligence. We then review the background, applications and performance metrics of AI, particularly Deep Learning (DL) and online learning, running in a ubiquitous system. Next, we provide a deep literature review of communication-efficient techniques, from both algorithmic and system perspectives, of distributed inference, training and online learning tasks across the combination of IoT devices, edge devices and cloud servers. Finally, we discuss our future vision and research challenges.


Modeling Users and Online Communities for Abuse Detection: A Position on Ethics and Explainability

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Abuse on the Internet is an important societal problem of our time. Millions of Internet users face harassment, racism, personal attacks, and other types of abuse across various platforms. The psychological effects of abuse on individuals can be profound and lasting. Consequently, over the past few years, there has been a substantial research effort towards automated abusive language detection in the field of NLP. In this position paper, we discuss the role that modeling of users and online communities plays in abuse detection. Specifically, we review and analyze the state of the art methods that leverage user or community information to enhance the understanding and detection of abusive language. We then explore the ethical challenges of incorporating user and community information, laying out considerations to guide future research. Finally, we address the topic of explainability in abusive language detection, proposing properties that an explainable method should aim to exhibit. We describe how user and community information can facilitate the realization of these properties and discuss the effective operationalization of explainability in view of the properties.


The MuSe 2021 Multimodal Sentiment Analysis Challenge: Sentiment, Emotion, Physiological-Emotion, and Stress

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Multimodal Sentiment Analysis (MuSe) 2021 is a challenge focusing on the tasks of sentiment and emotion, as well as physiological-emotion and emotion-based stress recognition through more comprehensively integrating the audio-visual, language, and biological signal modalities. The purpose of MuSe 2021 is to bring together communities from different disciplines; mainly, the audio-visual emotion recognition community (signal-based), the sentiment analysis community (symbol-based), and the health informatics community. We present four distinct sub-challenges: MuSe-Wilder and MuSe-Stress which focus on continuous emotion (valence and arousal) prediction; MuSe-Sent, in which participants recognise five classes each for valence and arousal; and MuSe-Physio, in which the novel aspect of `physiological-emotion' is to be predicted. For this years' challenge, we utilise the MuSe-CaR dataset focusing on user-generated reviews and introduce the Ulm-TSST dataset, which displays people in stressful depositions. This paper also provides detail on the state-of-the-art feature sets extracted from these datasets for utilisation by our baseline model, a Long Short-Term Memory-Recurrent Neural Network. For each sub-challenge, a competitive baseline for participants is set; namely, on test, we report a Concordance Correlation Coefficient (CCC) of .4616 CCC for MuSe-Wilder; .4717 CCC for MuSe-Stress, and .4606 CCC for MuSe-Physio. For MuSe-Sent an F1 score of 32.82 % is obtained.


A Neighbourhood Framework for Resource-Lean Content Flagging

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We propose a novel interpretable framework for cross-lingual content flagging, which significantly outperforms prior work both in terms of predictive performance and average inference time. The framework is based on a nearest-neighbour architecture and is interpretable by design. Moreover, it can easily adapt to new instances without the need to retrain it from scratch. Unlike prior work, (i) we encode not only the texts, but also the labels in the neighbourhood space (which yields better accuracy), and (ii) we use a bi-encoder instead of a cross-encoder (which saves computation time). Our evaluation results on ten different datasets for abusive language detection in eight languages shows sizable improvements over the state of the art, as well as a speed-up at inference time.


dictNN: A Dictionary-Enhanced CNN Approach for Classifying Hate Speech on Twitter

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Hate speech on social media is a growing concern, and automated methods have so far been sub-par at reliably detecting it. A major challenge lies in the potentially evasive nature of hate speech due to the ambiguity and fast evolution of natural language. To tackle this, we introduce a vectorisation based on a crowd-sourced and continuously updated dictionary of hate words and propose fusing this approach with standard word embedding in order to improve the classification performance of a CNN model. To train and test our model we use a merge of two established datasets (110,748 tweets in total). By adding the dictionary-enhanced input, we are able to increase the CNN model's predictive power and increase the F1 macro score by seven percentage points.