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The most watched movies of the week: New releases and some unexpected classics

Mashable

Wondering what everyone's been watching this week? Well, spring is in the air and so is action, action, action! Every week, the popularity of movies across streaming might be determined by promotions, star power, critic raves, social media buzz, good old-fashioned word of mouth, or a new addition to a beloved franchise. While the reasons may vary, you can't argue with the numbers that streaming aggregator Reelgood collected from hundreds of streaming services in the U.S. and UK. As it has for weeks, The Batman continues to reign supreme.


Look behind the curtain: Don't be dazzled by claims of 'artificial intelligence'

#artificialintelligence

We are presently living in an age of "artificial intelligence" -- but not how the companies selling "AI" would have you believe. According to Silicon Valley, machines are rapidly surpassing human performance on a variety of tasks from mundane, but well-defined and useful ones like automatic transcription to much vaguer skills like "reading comprehension" and "visual understanding." According to some, these skills even represent rapid progress toward "Artificial General Intelligence," or systems which are capable of learning new skills on their own. Given these grand and ultimately false claims, we need media coverage that holds tech companies to account. Far too often, what we get instead is breathless "gee whiz" reporting, even in venerable publications like The New York Times.


Understand your Algorithm with Grad-CAM

#artificialintelligence

Is AI just a black box that we started trusting enough to drive cars, detect diseases, identify suspects just because of the hype? You may have heard of the Netflix documentary, Coded Bias (you can watch the film here). The film criticizes deep learning algorithms for their inherent biases; specifically their failure to detect dark-skinned and female faces. The film suggests that the solution to the problem is in government. To "push for the first-ever legislation in the U.S. to govern against bias in the algorithms that impact us all."


Sonos launches cheaper Ray soundbar and new voice control system

The Guardian

Sonos, the wireless home-audio specialist, is launching a lower-cost model of its popular TV soundbars alongside its own new voice control system for its smart speakers after its public bust-up with Google. The new Ray soundbar is a more compact version of Sonos's popular Arc and Beam models, designed to fit neatly in TV stands without affecting sound quality. It connects to a TV through an optical cable, has wifi for streaming music and can be controlled with the Sonos app or a TV remote. The Ray will cost £279 in the UK or $279 in the US from 7 June, sitting below the £449 Beam as the firm's most affordable model. It has two tweeters and two midwoofer speakers, along with the company's Trueplay smart tuning system, promising balanced sound with solid bass and crisp dialogue.


Hyundai's bizarre Star Wars-style 'walking car' moves a step closer to reality

Daily Mail - Science & tech

It may sound like something straight out of Star Wars, but Hyundai's planned'walking car' is a step closer to reality after the vehicle manufacturer unveiled a new $20 million (£16 million) development centre to expedite its arrival. The aim of the New Horizon Studio, which has opened in Montana in the US, is to build vehicles for future customers who want or need to travel over terrains which are challenging for conventional ground vehicles. It will focus on the development of Ultimate Mobility Vehicles (UMVs), including a car with legs that can simply walk over anything it struggles to drive over. The Elevate concept, which resembles the All Terrain Armoured Transport (AT-AT) walkers found in the Star Wars universe, combines a traditional wheel with a leg that unfolds for dangerous terrain. It may sound like something straight out of Star Wars, but Hyundai's planned'walking car' (pictured in a concept image) is a step closer to reality after the vehicle manufacturer unveiled a new $20 million (£16 million) development centre to expedite its arrival Gwen Stefani enjoys celebrating Mother's Day with her family Bono performs'with or without you' in Kyiv after Zelensky invite Aussies shows what Dubai McDonald's looks like Its aim is to address challenging driving situations and potentially save lives as the first responder in natural disasters.


Unpacking black-box models

#artificialintelligence

Modern machine-learning models, such as neural networks, are often referred to as "black boxes" because they are so complex that even the researchers who design them can't fully understand how they make predictions. To provide some insights, researchers use explanation methods that seek to describe individual model decisions. For example, they may highlight words in a movie review that influenced the model's decision that the review was positive. But these explanation methods don't do any good if humans can't easily understand them, or even misunderstand them. So, MIT researchers created a mathematical framework to formally quantify and evaluate the understandability of explanations for machine-learning models.


Record-breaking camera keeps everything between 3 cm and 1.7 km in focus

#artificialintelligence

In photography, depth of field refers to how much of a three-dimensional space the camera can focus on at once. A shallow depth of field, for example, would keep the subject sharp but blur out much of the foreground and background. Now, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have taken inspiration from ancient trilobytes to demonstrate a new light field camera with the deepest depth of field ever recorded. Their visual systems were quite complex, including compound eyes, featuring anywhere between tens and thousands of tiny independent units, each with its own cornea, lens and photoreceptor cells. One trilobyte in particular, Dalmanitina socialis, captured the attention of NIST researchers due to its unique compound eye structure.


Texas researchers create plastic-eating enzyme that could quickly reduce waste, clean landfills

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. Researchers in Texas have created an enzyme variant that can break down plastics that would typically take hundreds of years to dissolve in a matter of hours or days. The creation by officials at The University of Texas at Austin could solve the problem of how to rid the world of billions of tons of plastic piling up in landfills and polluting natural lands and water. "The possibilities are endless across industries to leverage this leading-edge recycling process," Hal Alper, professor in the McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering at UT Austin said in a statement.


Intel CEO expects chip shortage to last until at least 2024

ZDNet

Since completing a degree in journalism, Aimee has had her fair share of covering various topics, including business, retail, manufacturing, and travel. She continues to expand her repertoire as a tech journalist with ZDNet. Intel chief Pat Gelsinger has predicted that the global chip shortage will remain a challenge for the industry until at least 2024, particularly in areas such as foundry capacity and tool availability. Despite this forecast, Gelsinger outlined that Intel is in a "good position" to manage the constraints that arise as a result of the supply chain shortage. "In fact, Intel is rising to meet this challenge," he told investors on Thursday during a first-quarter earnings call.


Kilmeade: George Orwell's dystopian society becoming a reality with Biden's latest action

FOX News

BRIAN KILMEADE: In his classic novel "1984," George Orwell warned the world of the dangers of government addicted to power. One where the narrative was controlled by the state and the people were forced to bend a knee. Truth-telling became the cardinal sin of Orwell's dystopian state, where a power hungry state reigned in on shutting down free speech and was all guided by what Orwell termed the Ministry of Truth. A propaganda branch of the state, in his book, whose priority was to control all forms of public information where industries like journalism, entertainment and art were all controlled by Big Brother, and the state told you what the truth was actually in their mind, which was the truth accepted. Now, the people had no say in any of it.