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The Weirdest Thing on Netflix

Slate

Sign up to receive the Future Tense newsletter every other Saturday. When my husband asked me if I wanted to try the "cat trivia game" on Netflix, I thought it was going to be some sort of quiz about felines. I like cats, so I said sure. The "cat trivia game," it turns out, is Cat Burglar, which Netflix calls an "edgy, over-the-top, interactive trivia toon." It debuted in February and comes from the makers of Black Mirror.


The Best Sci-Fi TV Shows on Netflix

#artificialintelligence

Netflix has an excellent international library, including German sci-fi gem Dark -- one of the best series on Netflix full stop. This adult animated anthology series spans a range of genres, with plenty of episodes hitting the Black Mirror comparison button. Robots in a post-apocalyptic city, farmers piloting mech suits and a space mission gone wrong all pop up in the first season. While the episodes can be hit and miss (some have been criticized for their treatment of women), you'll find plenty of thought-provoking and impressive animation. This apocalyptic sci-fi from Belgium will probably turn you off from flying any time soon.


MSNBC contributor deletes tweet of Russian plane being shot down after learning it was from video game

FOX News

Former U.S. ambassador to NATO provides insight on a potentially pivotal setback for Russia in its war on Ukraine on'The Story.' MSNBC contributor Barry R. McCaffrey, a retired four-star general, shared a video Monday of what he appeared to think was a Russian plane being shot down by Ukraine, but deleted the tweet after being informed it occurred in an animated video game. According to images of the original tweet, McCaffrey tweeted an animated image from the video game "Arma 3." MSNBC's Brian R. McCaffrey, a retired four star general, shared video of a Russian plane being shot down by Ukraine on Monday but deleted the tweet after being informed it occurred in an animated video game. McCaffrey wrote in the since-deleted tweet, "Russian aircraft getting nailed by UKR missile defense. Russians are losing large numbers of attack aircraft. UKR air defense becoming formidable," to accompany the animated image from the video game.


The most watched movies of the week: New releases and some unexpected classics

Mashable

Wondering what everyone's been watching this week? Well, spring is in the air and so is action, action, action! Every week, the popularity of movies across streaming might be determined by promotions, star power, critic raves, social media buzz, good old-fashioned word of mouth, or a new addition to a beloved franchise. While the reasons may vary, you can't argue with the numbers that streaming aggregator Reelgood collected from hundreds of streaming services in the U.S. and UK. As it has for weeks, The Batman continues to reign supreme.


Google is working on radar tech that could automatically pause Netflix

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Google has unveiled technology that can read people's body movements to let devices'understand the social context around them' and make decisions. Developed by Google's Advanced Technology and Products division (ATAP) in San Francisco, the technology consists of chips built into TVs, phones and computers. But rather than using cameras, the tech uses radar – radio waves that are reflected to determine the distance or angle of objects in the vicinity. If built into future devices, the technology could turn down the TV if you nod off or automatically pause Netflix when you leave the sofa. Assisted by machine learning algorithms, it would also generally allow devices to know that someone is approaching or entering their'personal space'. Google has unveiled technology that can read people's body movements to let devices'understand the social context around them' and make decisions, such as flashing up information when you walk by or turning down volume on Radar is an acronym, which stands for Radio detection and ranging.


The Best Movies and TV Shows Coming to Netflix, HBO, Amazon Prime, and Hulu in March

Slate

Every month, tons of new movies and TV shows become available to stream for free for U.S. subscribers to Netflix, HBO Max, Prime Video, and Hulu. With so many different streaming services, it can be hard to keep track of them all--especially if you belong to more than one. We'll let you decide which service has the best new titles. Family Watch Shrek Shrek 2 Where the Wild Things Are Nostalgia Watch My Best Friend's Wedding Zoolander Good Watch The Aviator Diner Fly Away Home Mogul Mowgli Starship Troopers The World of Jacques Demy The Young Girls Turn 25 Blade 2 (Mar. Binge Watch One Tree Hill Complete Series Starsky and Hutch Complete Series Whose Line Is It Anyway?


The Morning After: Marvel's Netflix shows will reappear on Disney , but only in Canada

Engadget

Marvel's first run of TV shows set in its cinematic universe, including Daredevil and Jessica Jones, have found a new home beyond Netflix – if you live north of the border. The shows, set to disappear from Netflix on March 1st, will appear on Disney Plus in Canada, starting March 16th. However – without spoiling any surprises – some characters have managed to make notable reappearances in recent Marvel movies and shows. Hopefully, Disney can figure out exactly where to take these shows, and hey, give The Defenders the do-over it deserves. I won't be taking any questions on this matter.


Everything coming to Netflix in March

Mashable

As we head into spring, it's time to take a look at the new movies and TV shows coming to Netflix this March. Original films to watch out for include time travel flick The Adam Project and robbery thriller Windfall. Other films joining Netflix's library include Shrek (and Shrek 2), A Nightmare on Elm Street, and The Shawshank Redemption. Netflix's March TV offerings feature true crime series like Bad Vegan: Fame, Fraud, Fugitives. There's a lot more where that came from.


The best tools for developing voice user interfaces

#artificialintelligence

A voice user interface, or VUI (pronounced VOO-hee), is described as a technology that allows people to interact with a computer or device using spoken commands. VUI technology is evolving much faster than its predecessors (think keyboards, mice and touchscreens). It's estimated that 94 million people own a smart speaker in the U.S. alone, and anyone who has used a mobile phone or TV remote in the last five years knows stand alone smart speakers aren't the only place where voice user interfaces are prevalent. A lot of this growth can be attributed to the technology itself. The artificial intelligence that powers the natural language understanding (NLU) behind the voice-powered experiences of giants like Apple, Amazon and Google is nothing short of amazing, but it's not just the remarkable technology that is driving the growth. Consider that we as human beings have been using spoken language for no less than 200,000 years (by most accounts).


Deepdub raises $20M for AI-powered dubbing that uses actors' original voices – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

Netflix's Korean drama "Squid Game" was one of the most-watched dubbed series of all time, proving the massive potential for foreign-language programming to become a hit in overseas markets. Now, a startup called Deepdub is capitalizing on the growing demand for localized content by automating parts of the dubbing process using AI technology. With its end-to-end platform, Deepdub can decrease the time it takes to complete a dubbing project, allowing content owners and studios to have results in weeks instead of months. What's more, it does this by using just a few minutes of the actors' voices -- so the dubbed version sounds more like the original. The Tel Aviv startup has now closed on $20 million in Series A funding for its efforts, led by New York-based investment firm Insight Partners.