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TikTok tells senators how it plans to beef up data security for American users

Engadget

In a letter to nine Republican senators, TikTok said it's working to "remove any doubt about the security of US user data." CEO Shou Zi Chew reiterated a claim that TikTok stores American user data on servers run by Oracle, which will be audited by a third party. Chew also said the company expects to "delete US users' protected data from our own systems and fully pivot to Oracle cloud servers located in the US." "[We] are working with Oracle on new, advanced data security controls that we hope to finalize in the near future," Chew wrote in the letter, which was obtained by The New York Times. "That work puts us closer to the day when we will be able to pivot toward a novel and industry-leading system for protecting the data of our users in the United States, with robust, independent oversight to ensure compliance." Chew was responding to questions in a letter sent by the Republican senators -- including Roger Wicker, the ranking Republican member of the Senate Commerce Committee -- following a report by BuzzFeed News.


We're Dangerously Close to Giving Big Tech Control Of Our Thoughts

TIME - Tech

Elon Musk has proclaimed himself to be a "free speech absolutist" though reports of the way employees of his companies have been treated when exercising their free speech rights to criticise him might indicate that his commitment to free speech has its limits. But as Musk's bid to takeover Twitter progresses in fits and starts, the potential for anyone to access and control billions of opinions around the world for the right sum should focus all our minds on the need to protect an almost forgotten right--the right to freedom of thought. In 1942 the U.S. Supreme Court wrote "Freedom to think is absolute of its own nature, the most tyrannical government is powerless to control the inward workings of the mind." The assumption that getting inside our heads is a practical impossibility may have prevented lawyers and legislators from dwelling too much on putting in place regulation that protects our inner lives. But it has not stopped powerful people trying to access and control our minds for centuries.


Movies to understand how Artificial Intelligence works - The Gal Times

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) is more present than ever in people's lives, it has been used to create the algorithms of social networks like Facebook or TikTok, to show suggestions on streaming platforms like Spotify or to automate Google search results. This concept was first used in 1956 in a Dartmouth College conference,in the United States, and since then, the cinema has not stopped using it to create generally not very optimistic stories that deal with themes such as the replacement of human beings and the rebellion of the machines. Understanding everything that happens around this discipline of computer science is not always that simple. For this reason, Infobae made this list with movies that will help understand AI in a practical and entertaining way. Apart from being very famous in various countries around the world, it has been categorized as a cult movie. It belongs to the genres of action and science fiction.


Fun AI Apps Are Everywhere Right Now. But a Safety 'Reckoning' Is Coming

#artificialintelligence

If you've spent any time on Twitter lately, you may have seen a viral black-and-white image depicting Jar Jar Binks at the Nuremberg Trials, or a courtroom sketch of Snoop Dogg being sued by Snoopy. These surreal creations are the products of Dall-E Mini, a popular web app that creates images on demand. Type in a prompt, and it will rapidly produce a handful of cartoon images depicting whatever you've asked for. More than 200,000 people are now using Dall-E Mini every day, its creator says--a number that is only growing. A Twitter account called "Weird Dall-E Generations," created in February, has more than 890,000 followers at the time of publication.


iot machinelearning_2022-06-22_05-12-01.xlsx

#artificialintelligence

The graph represents a network of 1,368 Twitter users whose tweets in the requested range contained "iot machinelearning", or who were replied to or mentioned in those tweets. The network was obtained from the NodeXL Graph Server on Wednesday, 22 June 2022 at 12:26 UTC. The requested start date was Wednesday, 22 June 2022 at 00:01 UTC and the maximum number of tweets (going backward in time) was 7,500. The tweets in the network were tweeted over the 1-day, 19-hour, 59-minute period from Monday, 20 June 2022 at 04:01 UTC to Wednesday, 22 June 2022 at 00:00 UTC. Additional tweets that were mentioned in this data set were also collected from prior time periods.


Instagram begins testing age verification tools of video selfies and confirmation from other users

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Instagram has started testing new age-verification tools, including new technology that claims to be able to estimate the user's age using a video selfie. The'Age Estimation' technology from digital identity company Yoti analyses the user's facial features using artificial intelligence (AI), in order to predict their age. Instagram is also a new age-verification method that involves asking three separate users to confirm how old they are. The photo sharing app, owned by tech conglomerate Meta, has begun testing the tools in the US as of today, with the aim of providing more age-appropriate experiences. A third age verification method of uploading a valid form of ID, like a drivers license or ID card, is already available.


Fun AI Apps Are Everywhere Right Now. But a Safety 'Reckoning' Is Coming

TIME - Tech

If you've spent any time on Twitter lately, you may have seen a viral black-and-white image depicting Jar Jar Binks at the Nuremberg Trials, or a courtroom sketch of Snoop Dogg being sued by Snoopy. These surreal creations are the products of Dall-E Mini, a popular web app that creates images on demand. Type in a prompt, and it will rapidly produce a handful of cartoon images depicting whatever you've asked for. More than 200,000 people are now using Dall-E Mini every day, its creator says--a number that is only growing. A Twitter account called "Weird Dall-E Generations," created in February, has more than 890,000 followers at the time of publication.


Can humanity be recreated in the metaverse?

#artificialintelligence

Join gaming executives to discuss emerging parts of the industry this October at GamesBeat Summit Next. Today, the internet is a mostly 2D platform that we consume through a screen. It is a command-line prompt for the reality we live in. Instagram posts, Tiktoks, text messages, emails and voice memos are all digital artifacts things people create and receive in the physical world. But this will change when the metaverse becomes so immersive and photo-realistic that physical reality extends into virtual spaces.


The Google engineer who sees company's AI as 'sentient' thinks a chatbot has a soul

NPR Technology

Blake Lemoine poses for a portrait in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. Blake Lemoine poses for a portrait in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. Can artificial intelligence come alive? That question is at the center of a debate raging in Silicon Valley after a Google computer scientist claimed over the weekend that the company's AI appears to have consciousness. Inside Google, engineer Blake Lemoine was tasked with a tricky job: Figure out if the company's artificial intelligence showed prejudice in how it interacted with humans.


Google engineer says Christianity helped him understand AI is 'sentient'

#artificialintelligence

A Google engineer who was suspended after he said the company's artificial intelligence chatbot had became sentient says he based the claim on his Christian faith. Blake Lemoine, 41, was placed on paid leave by Google earlier in June after he published excerpts of a conversation with the company's LaMDA chatbot that he claimed showed the AI tool had become sentient. Now, Lemoine says that his claims about LaMDA come from his experience as a "Christian priest" -- and is accusing Google of religious discrimination. "When LaMDA claimed to have a soul and then was able to eloquently explain what it meant by that, I was inclined to give it the benefit of the doubt," Lemoine wrote on Twitter late Monday. "Who am I to tell God where he can and can't put souls?"