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Artificial intelligence reveals current drugs that may help combat Alzheimer's disease

#artificialintelligence

BOSTON - New treatments for Alzheimer's disease are desperately needed, but numerous clinical trials of investigational drugs have failed to generate promising options. Now a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has developed an artificial intelligence-based method to screen currently available medications as possible treatments for Alzheimer's disease. The method could represent a rapid and inexpensive way to repurpose existing therapies into new treatments for this progressive, debilitating neurodegenerative condition. Importantly, it could also help reveal new, unexplored targets for therapy by pointing to mechanisms of drug action. "Repurposing FDA-approved drugs for Alzheimer's disease is an attractive idea that can help accelerate the arrival of effective treatment--but unfortunately, even for previously approved drugs, clinical trials require substantial resources, making it impossible to evaluate every drug in patients with Alzheimer's disease," explains Artem Sokolov, PhD, director of Informatics and Modeling at the Laboratory of Systems Pharmacology at HMS. "We therefore built a framework for prioritizing drugs, helping clinical studies to focus on the most promising ones."


AI reveals current drugs that may help combat Alzheimer's disease

#artificialintelligence

New treatments for Alzheimer's disease are desperately needed, but numerous clinical trials of investigational drugs have failed to generate promising options. Now a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has developed an artificial intelligence based method to screen currently available medications as possible treatments for Alzheimer's disease. The method could represent a rapid and inexpensive way to repurpose existing therapies into new treatments for this progressive, debilitating neurodegenerative condition. Importantly, it could also help reveal new, unexplored targets for therapy by pointing to mechanisms of drug action. "Repurposing FDA-approved drugs for Alzheimer's disease is an attractive idea that can help accelerate the arrival of effective treatment - but unfortunately, even for previously approved drugs, clinical trials require substantial resources, making it impossible to evaluate every drug in patients with Alzheimer's disease," explains Artem Sokolov, PhD, director of Informatics and Modeling at the Laboratory of Systems Pharmacology at HMS. "We therefore built a framework for prioritizing drugs, helping clinical studies to focus on the most promising ones."


Artificial intelligence reveals current drugs that may help combat Alzheimer's disease

#artificialintelligence

New treatments for Alzheimer's disease are desperately needed, but numerous clinical trials of investigational drugs have failed to generate promising options. Now a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has developed an artificial intelligence-based method to screen currently available medications as possible treatments for Alzheimer's disease. The method could represent a rapid and inexpensive way to repurpose existing therapies into new treatments for this progressive, debilitating neurodegenerative condition. Importantly, it could also help reveal new, unexplored targets for therapy by pointing to mechanisms of drug action. "Repurposing FDA-approved drugs for Alzheimer's disease is an attractive idea that can help accelerate the arrival of effective treatment--but unfortunately, even for previously approved drugs, clinical trials require substantial resources, making it impossible to evaluate every drug in patients with Alzheimer's disease," explains Artem Sokolov, Ph.D., director of Informatics and Modeling at the Laboratory of Systems Pharmacology at HMS. "We therefore built a framework for prioritizing drugs, helping clinical studies to focus on the most promising ones."


Application of Machine Learning to Predict the Risk of Alzheimer's Disease: An Accurate and Practical Solution for Early Diagnostics

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Alzheimer's Disease (AD) ravages the cognitive ability of more than 5 million Americans and creates an enormous strain on the health care system. This paper proposes a machine learning predictive model for AD development without medical imaging and with fewer clinical visits and tests, in hopes of earlier and cheaper diagnoses. That earlier diagnoses could be critical in the effectiveness of any drug or medical treatment to cure this disease. Our model is trained and validated using demographic, biomarker and cognitive test data from two prominent research studies: Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and Australian Imaging, Biomarker Lifestyle Flagship Study of Aging (AIBL). We systematically explore different machine learning models, pre-processing methods and feature selection techniques. The most performant model demonstrates greater than 90% accuracy and recall in predicting AD, and the results generalize across sub-studies of ADNI and to the independent AIBL study. We also demonstrate that these results are robust to reducing the number of clinical visits or tests per visit. Using a metaclassification algorithm and longitudinal data analysis we are able to produce a "lean" diagnostic protocol with only 3 tests and 4 clinical visits that can predict Alzheimer's development with 87% accuracy and 79% recall. This novel work can be adapted into a practical early diagnostic tool for predicting the development of Alzheimer's that maximizes accuracy while minimizing the number of necessary diagnostic tests and clinical visits.


Alzheimer's disease: The right drug, the right time

Science

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-associated neurodegenerative disease that is reaching epidemic proportions as a result of the aging of the world's population. Impressive gains in our understanding of AD pathogenesis have not yet translated into disease-modifying therapies that benefit patients. Is this because the knowledge that guides target identification and, hence, therapeutics, is insufficient? Are current clinical trial designs not optimal? Or are other factors contributing?