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Juul Survives a Blow From the FDA--for Now

WIRED

Can you Currently buy a Juul e-cigarette? That depends on what day of the week it is. Earlier this week the FDA denied marketing authorization for Juul, which first started selling its e-cigarettes in 2015 (though it has operated under various company names since 2007). The FDA said the reason for the denial was that Juul "failed to provide sufficient toxicology data to demonstrate the products were safe," ArsTechnica reports, and as such the agency could not complete its toxicology assessment. The FDA specifically pointed to "potentially harmful chemicals leaching from the company's proprietary e-liquid pods" as a concern.


Google Announces New AI App To Diagnose Skin Conditions

#artificialintelligence

We've all probably done it at some point: snapping a photo of a rash or a mole and sending it to a friend or colleague for advice on the "next steps". But often the "next steps" may include confusion, uncertainty, or just plain fear. So imagine if AI could guide you to a range of possible diagnoses, and provide you with a more realistic set of possibilities (as opposed to just guessing) on what the skin lesion may actually be. But Dr. Google has been keenly aware of the need for teledermatology to enhance our lives, and with their data indicating that over ten billion searches annually are made related to skin, hair and nail conditions, the natural progression was to take advantage of the high resolution camera in your smartphone and harness the power of AI to conduct a search of a skin condition that may be often difficult to describe in words alone. Well, this past Tuesday at the Google's annual developer conference, the tech giant revealed the fruits of 3 years of labor toward its goal of harnessing the diagnostic power of AI loaded into your smartphone to diagnose common skin conditions.


The internet tricked me into believing I can multitask

Mashable

When we spend so much of our time online, we're bound to learn something while clicking and scrolling. Discover something new with Mashable's series I learned it on the internet. I've never felt more like a hungry squirrel than when I spoke to a neuroscientist who's spent decades studying, and trying to expand, human attention spans. Just like a squirrel forages for nuts, he explained, humans forage for information. As a squirrel hops from tree to tree to gather food -- even if the tree it's hanging out in has plenty to offer -- humans hop from information source to information source.


AI for the next generation of medical imaging provides "a Google Maps for surgeons"

#artificialintelligence

"A Google Maps for surgeons" is how Perimeter Medical Imaging AI Inc. (TSXV: PINK) President and CFO Jeremy Sobotta described the AI software currently being developed by the company to complement its FDA-cleared medical imaging system at a recent investment conference. Perimeter is a medical technology company working to transform cancer surgery by creating ultra-high-resolution, real-time, advanced imaging tools to address unmet medical needs. The imaging tools have already been developed and are approved in ophthalmology and cardiology (optical coherence tomography or OCT). Perimeter is using this imaging technology (OTIS or Optical Tissue Imaging Console) to assess the tissues surrounding the known cancerous target area to determine whether more tissue should be removed during the ongoing surgery. The imaging technology has the ability to rapidly image large and complex surfaces.


AI and Accessibility

Communications of the ACM

According to the World Health Organization, more than one billion people worldwide have disabilities. The field of disability studies defines disability through a social lens; people are disabled to the extent that society creates accessibility barriers. AI technologies offer the possibility of removing many accessibility barriers; for example, computer vision might help people who are blind better sense the visual world, speech recognition and translation technologies might offer real-time captioning for people who are hard of hearing, and new robotic systems might augment the capabilities of people with limited mobility. Considering the needs of users with disabilities can help technologists identify high-impact challenges whose solutions can advance the state of AI for all users; however, ethical challenges such as inclusivity, bias, privacy, error, expectation setting, simulated data, and social acceptability must be considered. The inclusivity of AI systems refers to whether they are effective for diverse user populations.


Alphabet's Next Billion-Dollar Business: 10 Industries To Watch - CB Insights Research

#artificialintelligence

Alphabet is using its dominance in the search and advertising spaces -- and its massive size -- to find its next billion-dollar business. From healthcare to smart cities to banking, here are 10 industries the tech giant is targeting. With growing threats from its big tech peers Microsoft, Apple, and Amazon, Alphabet's drive to disrupt has become more urgent than ever before. The conglomerate is leveraging the power of its first moats -- search and advertising -- and its massive scale to find its next billion-dollar businesses. To protect its current profits and grow more broadly, Alphabet is edging its way into industries adjacent to the ones where it has already found success and entering new spaces entirely to find opportunities for disruption. Evidence of Alphabet's efforts is showing up in several major industries. For example, the company is using artificial intelligence to understand the causes of diseases like diabetes and cancer and how to treat them. Those learnings feed into community health projects that serve the public, and also help Alphabet's effort to build smart cities. Elsewhere, Alphabet is using its scale to build a better virtual assistant and own the consumer electronics software layer. It's also leveraging that scale to build a new kind of Google Pay-operated checking account. In this report, we examine how Alphabet and its subsidiaries are currently working to disrupt 10 major industries -- from electronics to healthcare to transportation to banking -- and what else might be on the horizon. Within the world of consumer electronics, Alphabet has already found dominance with one product: Android. Mobile operating system market share globally is controlled by the Linux-based OS that Google acquired in 2005 to fend off Microsoft and Windows Mobile. Today, however, Alphabet's consumer electronics strategy is being driven by its work in artificial intelligence. Google is building some of its own hardware under the Made by Google line -- including the Pixel smartphone, the Chromebook, and the Google Home -- but the company is doing more important work on hardware-agnostic software products like Google Assistant (which is even available on iOS).



AI and Accessibility: A Discussion of Ethical Considerations

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This is a preprint of a column that has been accepted for publication as a "Viewpoint" in an upcoming issue of Communications of the ACM. According to the World Health Organization, more than one billion people worldwide have disabilities. The field of disability studies defines disability through a social lens; people are disabled to the extent that society creates accessibility barriers. AI technologies offer the possibility of removing many accessibility barriers; for example, computer vision might help people who are blind better sense the visual world, speech recognition and translation technologies might offer real time captioning for people who are hard of hearing, and new robotic systems might augment the capabilities of people with limited mobility. Considering the needs of users with disabilities can help technologists identify high-impact challenges whose solutions can advance the state of AI for all users; however, ethical challenges such as inclusivity, bias, privacy, error, expectation setting, simulated data, and social acceptability must be considered.


State of AI Report 2019

#artificialintelligence

We believe that AI will be a force multiplier on technological progress in our increasingly digital, data-driven world. This is because everything around us today, ranging from culture to consumer products, is a product of intelligence. In this report, we set out to capture a snapshot of the exponential progress in AI with a focus on developments in the past 12 months. Consider this report as a compilation of the most interesting things we've seen with a goal of triggering an informed conversation about the state of AI and its implication for the future. This edition builds on the inaugural State of AI Report 2018, which can be found here: www.stateof.ai/2018 We consider the following key dimensions in our report: - Research: Technology breakthroughs and their capabilities.


Google, Fitbit, AdvaMed join to advance AI tools

#artificialintelligence

The joint effort comes as health systems are stepping up adoption and investment in data analytics, including predictive analytics and AI. In recent survey of CIOs, CTOs and chief analytics officers conducted by the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions, 84% said such technology will be extremely important to their organization's strategy over the next three years. Other healthcare sectors are investing in AI as well, giving rise to potential safety, efficacy and ethical issues as the technology is more frequently used. One year ago, FDA approved the first autonomous AI diagnostic system for sale in the U.S. The cloud-based IDx-DR software detects diabetic retinopathy in images taken by retinal cameras. And in February, Verily, the life sciences arm of Google parent Alphabet, launched an eye disease screening algorithm at Aravind Eye Hospital in Madurai, India.