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The New Intelligence Game

#artificialintelligence

The relevance of the video is that the browser identified the application being used by the IAI as Google Earth and, according to the OSC 2006 report, the Arabic-language caption reads Islamic Army in Iraq/The Military Engineering Unit – Preparations for Rocket Attack, the video was recorded in 5/1/2006, we provide, in Appendix A, a reproduction of the screenshot picture made available in the OSC report. Now, prior to the release of this video demonstration of the use of Google Earth to plan attacks, in accordance with the OSC 2006 report, in the OSC-monitored online forums, discussions took place on the use of Google Earth as a GEOINT tool for terrorist planning. On August 5, 2005 the user "Al-Illiktrony" posted a message to the Islamic Renewal Organization forum titled A Gift for the Mujahidin, a Program To Enable You to Watch Cities of the World Via Satellite, in this post the author dedicated Google Earth to the mujahidin brothers and to Shaykh Muhammad al-Mas'ari, the post was replied in the forum by "Al-Mushtaq al-Jannah" warning that Google programs retain complete information about their users. This is a relevant issue, however, there are two caveats, given the amount of Google Earth users, it may be difficult for Google to flag a jihadist using the functionality in time to prevent an attack plan, one possible solution would be for Google to flag computers based on searched websites and locations, for instance to flag computers that visit certain critical sites, but this is a problem when landmarks are used, furthermore, and this is the second caveat, one may not use one's own computer to produce the search or even mask the IP address. On October 3, 2005, as described in the OSC 2006 report, in a reply to a posting by Saddam Al-Arab on the Baghdad al-Rashid forum requesting the identification of a roughly sketched map, "Almuhannad" posted a link to a site that provided a free download of Google Earth, suggesting that the satellite imagery from Google's service could help identify the sketch.


Fair ranking: a critical review, challenges, and future directions

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Ranking, recommendation, and retrieval systems are widely used in online platforms and other societal systems, including e-commerce, media-streaming, admissions, gig platforms, and hiring. In the recent past, a large "fair ranking" research literature has been developed around making these systems fair to the individuals, providers, or content that are being ranked. Most of this literature defines fairness for a single instance of retrieval, or as a simple additive notion for multiple instances of retrievals over time. This work provides a critical overview of this literature, detailing the often context-specific concerns that such an approach misses: the gap between high ranking placements and true provider utility, spillovers and compounding effects over time, induced strategic incentives, and the effect of statistical uncertainty. We then provide a path forward for a more holistic and impact-oriented fair ranking research agenda, including methodological lessons from other fields and the role of the broader stakeholder community in overcoming data bottlenecks and designing effective regulatory environments.


Forecasting: theory and practice

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Forecasting has always been at the forefront of decision making and planning. The uncertainty that surrounds the future is both exciting and challenging, with individuals and organisations seeking to minimise risks and maximise utilities. The large number of forecasting applications calls for a diverse set of forecasting methods to tackle real-life challenges. This article provides a non-systematic review of the theory and the practice of forecasting. We provide an overview of a wide range of theoretical, state-of-the-art models, methods, principles, and approaches to prepare, produce, organise, and evaluate forecasts. We then demonstrate how such theoretical concepts are applied in a variety of real-life contexts. We do not claim that this review is an exhaustive list of methods and applications. However, we wish that our encyclopedic presentation will offer a point of reference for the rich work that has been undertaken over the last decades, with some key insights for the future of forecasting theory and practice. Given its encyclopedic nature, the intended mode of reading is non-linear. We offer cross-references to allow the readers to navigate through the various topics. We complement the theoretical concepts and applications covered by large lists of free or open-source software implementations and publicly-available databases.


The Role of Social Movements, Coalitions, and Workers in Resisting Harmful Artificial Intelligence and Contributing to the Development of Responsible AI

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

There is mounting public concern over the influence that AI based systems has in our society. Coalitions in all sectors are acting worldwide to resist hamful applications of AI. From indigenous people addressing the lack of reliable data, to smart city stakeholders, to students protesting the academic relationships with sex trafficker and MIT donor Jeffery Epstein, the questionable ethics and values of those heavily investing in and profiting from AI are under global scrutiny. There are biased, wrongful, and disturbing assumptions embedded in AI algorithms that could get locked in without intervention. Our best human judgment is needed to contain AI's harmful impact. Perhaps one of the greatest contributions of AI will be to make us ultimately understand how important human wisdom truly is in life on earth.


Predicting Links on Wikipedia with Anchor Text Information

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Wikipedia, the largest open-collaborative online encyclopedia, is a corpus of documents bound together by internal hyperlinks. These links form the building blocks of a large network whose structure contains important information on the concepts covered in this encyclopedia. The presence of a link between two articles, materialised by an anchor text in the source page pointing to the target page, can increase readers' understanding of a topic. However, the process of linking follows specific editorial rules to avoid both under-linking and over-linking. In this paper, we study the transductive and the inductive tasks of link prediction on several subsets of the English Wikipedia and identify some key challenges behind automatic linking based on anchor text information. We propose an appropriate evaluation sampling methodology and compare several algorithms. Moreover, we propose baseline models that provide a good estimation of the overall difficulty of the tasks.


Building a better data economy

MIT Technology Review

It's "time to wake up and do a better job," says publisher Tim O'Reilly--from getting serious about climate change to building a better data economy. And the way a better data economy is built is through data commons--or data as a common resource--not as the giant tech companies are acting now, which is not just keeping data to themselves but profiting from our data and causing us harm in the process. "When companies are using the data they collect for our benefit, it's a great deal," says O'Reilly, founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media. "When companies are using it to manipulate us, or to direct us in a way that hurts us, or that enhances their market power at the expense of competitors who might provide us better value, then they're harming us with our data." And that's the next big thing he's researching: a specific type of harm that happens when tech companies use data against us to shape what we see, hear, and believe. It's what O'Reilly calls "algorithmic rents," which uses data, algorithms, and user interface design as a way of controlling who gets what information and why. Unfortunately, one only has to look at the news to see the rapid spread of misinformation on the internet tied to unrest in countries across the world. We can ask who profits, but perhaps the better question is "who suffers?" According to O'Reilly, "If you build an economy where you're taking more out of the system than you're putting back or that you're creating, then guess what, you're not long for this world." That really matters because users of this technology need to stop thinking about the worth of individual data and what it means when very few companies control that data, even when it's more valuable in the open. After all, there are "consequences of not creating enough value for others." We're now approaching a different idea: what if it's actually time to start rethinking capitalism as a whole? "It's a really great time for us to be talking about how do we want to change capitalism, because we change it every 30, 40 years," O'Reilly says. He clarifies that this is not about abolishing capitalism, but what we have isn't good enough anymore. "We actually have to do better, and we can do better. And to me better is defined by increasing prosperity for everyone."


The AI Index 2021 Annual Report

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Welcome to the fourth edition of the AI Index Report. This year we significantly expanded the amount of data available in the report, worked with a broader set of external organizations to calibrate our data, and deepened our connections with the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI). The AI Index Report tracks, collates, distills, and visualizes data related to artificial intelligence. Its mission is to provide unbiased, rigorously vetted, and globally sourced data for policymakers, researchers, executives, journalists, and the general public to develop intuitions about the complex field of AI. The report aims to be the most credible and authoritative source for data and insights about AI in the world.


Problematic Machine Behavior: A Systematic Literature Review of Algorithm Audits

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

While algorithm audits are growing rapidly in commonality and public importance, relatively little scholarly work has gone toward synthesizing prior work and strategizing future research in the area. This systematic literature review aims to do just that, following PRISMA guidelines in a review of over 500 English articles that yielded 62 algorithm audit studies. The studies are synthesized and organized primarily by behavior (discrimination, distortion, exploitation, and misjudgement), with codes also provided for domain (e.g. search, vision, advertising, etc.), organization (e.g. Google, Facebook, Amazon, etc.), and audit method (e.g. sock puppet, direct scrape, crowdsourcing, etc.). The review shows how previous audit studies have exposed public-facing algorithms exhibiting problematic behavior, such as search algorithms culpable of distortion and advertising algorithms culpable of discrimination. Based on the studies reviewed, it also suggests some behaviors (e.g. discrimination on the basis of intersectional identities), domains (e.g. advertising algorithms), methods (e.g. code auditing), and organizations (e.g. Twitter, TikTok, LinkedIn) that call for future audit attention. The paper concludes by offering the common ingredients of successful audits, and discussing algorithm auditing in the context of broader research working toward algorithmic justice.


Neural Methods for Effective, Efficient, and Exposure-Aware Information Retrieval

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Neural networks with deep architectures have demonstrated significant performance improvements in computer vision, speech recognition, and natural language processing. The challenges in information retrieval (IR), however, are different from these other application areas. A common form of IR involves ranking of documents -- or short passages -- in response to keyword-based queries. Effective IR systems must deal with query-document vocabulary mismatch problem, by modeling relationships between different query and document terms and how they indicate relevance. Models should also consider lexical matches when the query contains rare terms -- such as a person's name or a product model number -- not seen during training, and to avoid retrieving semantically related but irrelevant results. In many real-life IR tasks, the retrieval involves extremely large collections -- such as the document index of a commercial Web search engine -- containing billions of documents. Efficient IR methods should take advantage of specialized IR data structures, such as inverted index, to efficiently retrieve from large collections. Given an information need, the IR system also mediates how much exposure an information artifact receives by deciding whether it should be displayed, and where it should be positioned, among other results. Exposure-aware IR systems may optimize for additional objectives, besides relevance, such as parity of exposure for retrieved items and content publishers. In this thesis, we present novel neural architectures and methods motivated by the specific needs and challenges of IR tasks.


Apple Is Quietly Working On Its Own Search Engine To Take On Google

International Business Times

Apple may be stealthily developing its own search engine, as Google faces a lawsuit from the U.S. antitrust authorities regarding the search engine giant's agreements with companies to be the default search tool. In the newest operating system update for the iPhone, the iOS 14, Apple has started showing its own search results and direct links to websites when users search from their home screen. In its updated version, iOS 14 does not use Google for many of its search functions, as it previously used to. The search window that appears in iPhones when users swipe right now compiles Apple-generated search suggestions rather than Google results. Earlier this week, the U.S. Department of Justice, in a landmark lawsuit said, Google is monopolizing the search space by entering into multi-billion dollar deals with mobile companies like Apple, Motorola, and network carriers like AT&T and Verizon, to be the default search engine on devices.