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How AI is transforming remote cardiac care for patients - MedCity News

#artificialintelligence

The pandemic accelerated the advancement of artificial intelligence (AI) in remote patient care. Physicians are increasingly using digital patient monitoring to better track health data, identify abnormalities, and provide patient-specific treatment -- all without the need for in-person interaction. Additionally, emergency departments are employing remote monitoring solutions to allow some patients to leave the hospital sooner. These transformative technologies are leading to better outcomes for patients and reduced healthcare costs. AI use cases continue to grow in healthcare, as constant learning and training of algorithms results in smarter technology as well as improved patient experiences. Most AI applications in healthcare use "augmented intelligence," which curates the algorithms' output to provide clinicians with direction on "where to look" when they get the analysis.


How the US plans to manage artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

US AI guidelines are everything the EU's AI Act is not: voluntary, non-prescriptive and focused on changing the culture of tech companies. As the EU's Artificial Intelligence (AI) Act fights its way through multiple rounds of revisions at the hands of MEPs, in the US a little-known organisation is quietly working up its own guidelines to help channel the development of such a promising and yet perilous technology. In March, the Maryland-based National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released a first draft of its AI Risk Management Framework, which sets out a very different vision from the EU. The work is being led by Elham Tabassi, a computer vision researcher who joined the organisation just over 20 years ago. Then, "We built [AI] systems just because we could," she said.


Tesla Autopilot under investigation following crash that killed three people

Engadget

A recent Model S crash that killed three people has sparked another Federal probe into Tesla's Autopilot system, The Wall Street Journal has reported. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is conducting the investigation and said it's currently looking into more than 30 incidents involving Tesla's Autopilot. The accident occurred on May 12th in Newport Beach's Mariners Mile strip, according to the Orange County Register. The EV reportedly struck a curb and ran into construction equipment, killing all three occupants. Three construction workers were also sent to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.


Democratic lawmakers want FTC to investigate controversial identity firm ID.me

Engadget

A group of Democratic lawmakers led by Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon is calling on the Federal Trade Commission to investigate ID.me, the controversial identification company best known for its work with the Internal Revenue Service. In a letter addressed to FTC Chair Lina Khan, the group suggests the firm misled the American public about the capabilities of its facial recognition technology. Specifically, lawmakers point to a statement ID.me made at the start of the year. After CEO Blake Hall said the company did not use one-to-many facial recognition, an approach that involves matching images against those in a database, ID.me backtracked on those claims. It clarified it uses a "specific" one-to-many check during user enrollment to prevent identity theft.


NASA will soon bid farewell to its Mars InSight lander

Engadget

NASA's Mars InSight lander will soon no longer be able to send back data and images scientists can analyze to better understand the red planet. It's been gradually losing power for a while now as dust continues to accumulate on its solar panels. The darker skies expected in the next few months -- also due to having more dust in the air -- won't be doing it any favors, as well. InSight's solar panels used to be able to generate around 5,000 watt-hours of energy each Martian day, which is enough to power an electric oven for an hour and 40 minutes. These days, they can only produce roughly 500 watt-hours of energy per Martian day, enough to power an electric oven for 10 minutes at most.


NASA's InSight Mars Lander's Days Are Numbered

WIRED

On May 4, NASA's InSight lander made a huge discovery, recording the biggest quake ever detected on another world, a magnitude 5 temblor. But InSight's greatest accomplishment may also be its last act; just two weeks later, scientists on the InSight team revealed that the lander's solar panels are now blanketed with dust, which has gradually accumulated since its arrival on the planet. Those panels' diminishing power will likely spell the end of the mission. When the lander arrived on the Red Planet, the panels generated 5,000 watt-hours per sol (a Martian day), but now they're down to about a tenth of that, said Kathya Zamora Garcia, InSight deputy project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, at a virtual press conference on Tuesday. The scientists will keep running Insight's seismometer and robotic arm camera full-time for a few more weeks, and will run them for half-days every other sol after that, but they expect InSight's science operations to end this summer, possibly in July.


MSNBC contributor deletes tweet of Russian plane being shot down after learning it was from video game

FOX News

Former U.S. ambassador to NATO provides insight on a potentially pivotal setback for Russia in its war on Ukraine on'The Story.' MSNBC contributor Barry R. McCaffrey, a retired four-star general, shared a video Monday of what he appeared to think was a Russian plane being shot down by Ukraine, but deleted the tweet after being informed it occurred in an animated video game. According to images of the original tweet, McCaffrey tweeted an animated image from the video game "Arma 3." MSNBC's Brian R. McCaffrey, a retired four star general, shared video of a Russian plane being shot down by Ukraine on Monday but deleted the tweet after being informed it occurred in an animated video game. McCaffrey wrote in the since-deleted tweet, "Russian aircraft getting nailed by UKR missile defense. Russians are losing large numbers of attack aircraft. UKR air defense becoming formidable," to accompany the animated image from the video game.


From The Link: Lessons Learned From the SubT Challenge

CMU School of Computer Science

As the countdown started, a boxy robot with four big wheels carrying a host of cameras, sensors, communication equipment, autonomy software and the computing power to make it all work together rolled down a ramp into a dark tunnel. It did not know where it was, what was ahead of it or where it was going. It was there to explore. Over the next hour, more robots followed: wheeled robots, drones and a dog-like quadruped. Team Explorer deployed eight robots for the final round of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Subterranean, or SubT, Challenge -- a three-year competition during which teams from around the world raced to develop robotic systems that could autonomously operate in underground environments like caves, mines or subway stations for search and rescue missions.


The US Military Is Building Its Own Metaverse

WIRED

On May 10, two fighter pilots performed a high-altitude proto-metaverse experiment. A few thousand feet above the desert of California, in a pair of Berkut 540 jets, they donned custom AR headsets to connect to a system that overlaid a ghostly, glowing image of a refueling aircraft flying alongside them in the sky. One of the pilots then performed a refueling maneuver with the virtual tanker while the other looked on. Welcome to the fledgling military metaverse. It isn't only Silicon Valley that's gripped by metaverse mania these days.


Feds Warn Employers Against Discriminatory Hiring Algorithms

WIRED

As companies increasingly involve AI in their hiring processes, advocates, lawyers, and researchers have continued to sound the alarm. Algorithms have been found to automatically assign job candidates different scores based on arbitrary criteria like whether they wear glasses or a headscarf or have a bookshelf in the background. Hiring algorithms can penalize applicants for having a Black-sounding name, mentioning a women's college, and even submitting their résumé using certain file types. They can disadvantage people who stutter or have a physical disability that limits their ability to interact with a keyboard. All of this has gone widely unchecked.