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NBC, CNN Sunday shows spend just seconds on botched Afghan drone strike after ignoring blunder last week

FOX News

'Fox & Friends Weekend' co-host Pete Hegseth reacts to the U.S. drone that killed civilians instead of ISIS-K members in Afghanistan. After previously avoiding the botched U.S. drone strike that killed Afghan civilians instead of terrorists, both CNN and NBC's Sunday morning news shows dedicated just seconds of coverage to the Biden foreign policy blunder. On Friday, the Pentagon confirmed that the Aug. 28 drone strike was a "tragic mistake" that resulted in ten dead civilians, including seven children, which was meant to be in response to the Aug. 26 terrorist attack outside the Kabul airport that killed 13 U.S. servicemen. This came one week after the New York Times published a stunning visual investigation that came to the same conclusion. The Biden administration had announced that "two high profile" ISIS-K fighters who were dubbed as "planners and facilitators" of the suicide bombing were killed in the strike.


Three Sunday shows ignored NYT report on botched drone strike Pentagon now admits killed 10 Afghan civilians

FOX News

Fox News anchor Bret Baier offers analysis on that and other breaking news stories, on'Your World'. Three of the five prominent Sunday morning newscasts avoided the explosive New York Times report about the botched U.S. drone strike the Pentagon finally admitted killed Afghan civilians rather than ISIS-K terrorists the Biden administration previously touted. During a Friday press conference, the Pentagon confirmed that the Aug. 28 drone strike was a "tragic mistake" that killed ten civilians, including seven children, which was meant to be in response to the Aug. 26 terrorist attack outside the Kabul airport that left 13 U.S. servicemen dead. This came one week after the Times published a stunning visual investigation that came to the same conclusion. The Biden administration had announced that "two high profile" ISIS-K fighters who were dubbed as "planners and facilitators" of the suicide bombing were killed in the strike.


20 years on, the 'war on terror' grinds along with no end in sight

The Japan Times

When U.S. President Joe Biden told an exhausted nation on Aug. 31 that the last C-17 cargo plane had left Taliban-controlled Kabul, ending two decades of American military misadventure in Afghanistan, he defended the frantic, bloodstained exit with a simple statement: "I was not going to extend this forever war." And yet the war grinds on. As Biden drew the curtain on Afghanistan, the CIA was quietly expanding a secret base deep in the Sahara, from which it runs drone flights to monitor al-Qaida and Islamic State group militants in Libya, as well as extremists in Niger, Chad and Mali. The military's Africa Command resumed drone strikes against the Shabab, an al-Qaida-linked group in Somalia. The Pentagon is weighing whether to send dozens of Special Forces trainers back to Somalia to help local troops fight militants.


Survey XII: What Is the Future of Ethical AI Design? – Imagining the Internet

#artificialintelligence

Results released June 16, 2021 – Pew Research Center and Elon University's Imagining the Internet Center asked experts where they thought efforts aimed at ethical artificial intelligence design would stand in the year 2030. Some 602 technology innovators, developers, business and policy leaders, researchers and activists responded to this specific question. The Question – Regarding the application of AI Ethics by 2030: In recent years, there have been scores of convenings and even more papers generated proposing ethical frameworks for the application of artificial intelligence (AI). They cover a host of issues including transparency, justice and fairness, privacy, freedom and human autonomy, beneficence and non-maleficence, freedom, trust, sustainability and dignity. Our questions here seek your predictions about the possibilities for such efforts. By 2030, will most of the AI systems being used by organizations of all sorts employ ethical principles focused primarily on the public ...


Fred Fleitz: Biden is a threat to our national security. Congress, will you keep us safe?

FOX News

'The Five' hosts give their take on Biden's call with former Afghan President Ghani amid the crisis in Afghanistan In one of the most tin-eared and imbecilic speeches ever given by a U.S. president, Joe Biden claimed Tuesday that the sudden withdrawal of U.S troops from Afghanistan that he ordered without a plan and without notifying the Afghan government and America's allies was an "extraordinary success." Let's stipulate that Biden's reckless withdrawal from Afghanistan that cost the lives of 13 U.S. servicemen and left Americans behind can in no way be called an extraordinary success. The truth, as The Wall Street Journal said, is that Biden and his advisers "have decided that the only way out of this debacle is to lie about it, blame everyone else and claim that defeat is really a victory." Biden's abrupt Afghanistan withdrawal was in fact a catastrophe for Afghanistan, the United States and the world. At the same time, it was a major victory for radical Islamist terrorists, the radical Islam movement and America's adversaries around the world.


Pentagon will launch drone strikes in Afghanistan 'if and when we need to,' spokesman says

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. The Pentagon will continue to conduct drone strikes against ISIS-K militants and other targets within Afghanistan when necessary even after the permanent withdrawal of the U.S. military presence within the country, spokesman John Kirby said on Tuesday. The U.S. launched deadly drone strikes against an individual described as an "ISIS-K planner" as well as a suspected suicide car bomber in recent days after the terrorist group claimed responsibility for suicide bombings that killed 13 U.S. service members. Kirby indicated the Pentagon would utilize drone strikes if threats arose in the future.


U.S. Says Drone Strike Kills ISIS Bombers Targeting Kabul Airport

Slate

Mere ours after President Joe Biden warned it was "highly likely" there would be another terrorist attack at the airport in Kabul, a U.S. drone strike blew up a vehicle filled with explosives in the Afghan capital on Sunday. The vehicle was carrying "multiple suicide bombers" from Afghanistan's Islamic State affiliate who were planning to strike the Kabul International Airport amid the ongoing evacuation efforts, according to U.S. officials. The strike targeted "an imminent ISIS-K threat to Hamad Karzai International airport," said a spokesman for the U.S. Central Command. "Significant secondary explosions from the vehicle indicated the presence of a substantial amount of explosive material." Earlier in the day, the U.S. Embassy in Kabul had warned of a "specific, credible threat" to the area surrounding the Kabul airport.


Policy Brief

Stanford HAI

The U.S. Intelligence Community faces a moment of reckoning and AI lies at the heart of it. Since 9/11, America's intelligence agencies have become hardwired to fight terrorism. Today's threat landscape, however, is changing dramatically, with a resurgence of great power competition and the rise of cyber threats enabling states and non-state actors to spy, steal, disrupt, destroy, and deceive across vast distances -- all without firing a shot. The Intelligence Community (IC) faces a moment of reckoning. If the IC cannot adopt AI and other emerging technologies successfully, it risks failure.


Ex-Air Force intelligence analyst gets 45 months for leaking secrets about drone program in Afghanistan

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com. A Tennessee man was sentenced Tuesday to 45 months in prison for leaking classified information about the U.S. drone program in Afghanistan while he was working as an Air Force intelligence analyst. Daniel Hale, 33, pleaded guilty in March to violating the Espionage Act by leaking top-secret documents to a reporter. Hale, who was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, said his guilt over participating in lethal drone strikes in Afghanistan led him to leak government secrets.


NSA's Jason Wang: Intelligence Community to Need AI in the Future - Executive Gov

#artificialintelligence

Jason Wang, technical director of the National Security Agency's Computer and Analytic Sciences Research Group, said he predicts the intelligence community will need artificial intelligence to protect U.S. networks in the future. Wang said at a virtual event on July 12th that intelligence community components need to pursue more partnerships to maximize capabilities against adversaries, according to an article published by NSA. "At the NSA, with most of our industry and academic counterparts, our journey started in this area of natural language processing and computer vision -- applying capabilities like machine transcription, machine translation … to our mission," he stated. Wang said NSA has been working to mature these foundational AI applications to support core missions, including the agency's cybersecurity triage mission.