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NASA Releases Hi-Res Video, Audio Of Mars Helicopter Flying Across Red Planet

International Business Times

NASA's Perseverance Mars rover has achieved yet another first after capturing the sounds of another spacecraft hovering on the red planet. Using the microphone on its rock-zapping SuperCam instrument, the six-wheeled robot listened to the sounds of the Ingenuity helicopter on April 30 and recorded the whirring of its fast-spinning rotors. This marked the first time a spacecraft has recorded audio of another probe on a world beyond Earth. This was the chopper's fourth flight since Perseverance and Ingenuity landed together on Feb. 18 on the floor of Mars' Jezero Crater, NASA said in a statement. A video recently released by NASA combined the footage from Perseverance's Mastcam-Z imager of the solar-powered helicopter with the recorded audio, allowing scientists to know how the robot is performing just by tuning in to the sound it makes.


NASA releases video and audio of Ingenuity flying on Mars as the helicopter sets off on its own Friday

FOX News

Jose Hernandez joins'Fox News Live' to discuss NASA's historic feat and Blue Origin's latest successful launch, return. NASA's Mars Ingenuity helicopter took off on its fifth test flight Friday, but it won't be returning to the Perseverance rover this time. The helicopter took flight around 3:30 p.m. ET from Wright Brothers Field, where it has performed its previous test flights, with the plan this time to head south 423 feet and land in a new area for the first time. Data from the light will transmit back to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory around 7:30 p.m. on Friday. NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter can be seen hovering over Jezero Crater.


The Morning After: NASA makes more flight plans for the Mars copter

Engadget

While there are many free-to-play titles these days, it seems like most high-profile games don't give players a way to try them out without paying the full price up front. That's not the case for Resident Evil Village, although an odd time-locked system has made it frustrating for fans to dive into the game before it's released next week. The good news is that Capcom has relaxed its policy a bit. The final demo will unlock tonight on PlayStation, Xbox, Steam and Stadia, and players can get a 60 minute taste of the game -- complete with towering vampire ladies -- at any point over the next eight days. On Friday, NASA announced it plans to transition the rotorcraft to an operational role once it completes its remaining test flights.


NASA Mars helicopter 'Ingenuity' fails to take flight during fourth run, rescheduled to Friday

FOX News

Jose Hernandez joins'Fox News Live' to discuss NASA's historic feat and Blue Origin's latest successful launch, return. NASA's helicopter on Mars, the four-pound "Ingenuity," failed to get off the ground for its fourth flight Thursday, but NASA said it is safe and will try again Friday. Previous test flights for the helicopter went well, with Ingenuity rising up 16 feet in the air during the third flight last Sunday then flashing downrange about 50 yards at a speed of 6.6 feet per second. The second test flight on April 22 and the first flight on April 19 also went as planned. The cause of Thursday's hiccup was a "watchdog" timer issue that prevented Ingenuity from transitioning to "flight mode."


A Traffic Cop for Low Earth Orbit

Communications of the ACM

On Earth, avoiding collisions is a key priority for traffic cops, air traffic controllers, and the parents of toddlers. It is no different in space--and perhaps even more critical--given that objects orbiting the Earth are moving at more than 17,000 m.p.h., which means that even very small objects less than a centimeter in diameter have caused damage to the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, and satellites. In fact, the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) estimates there are more than 500,000 such objects orbiting the Earth that are larger than a marble, and at least a million smaller pieces of debris that cannot be tracked. Based on the growing number of commercial and government launches of spacecraft, satellites, and even space stations, the number of objects that will need to be catalogued, tracked, and managed is expected to grow significantly in the coming years. And the solutions to this issue are fraught with both technical and political challenges.


Ingenuity has flown on Mars; what's next in NASA's Perseverance mission?

FOX News

'Gutfeld!' host is joined by Tyrus Murdoch, Katherine Timpf, Steve Hilton and Joe DeVito to discuss the latest space feat Now that NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter has completed its first test flight on the red planet, members of the agency's Southern California-based Jet Propulsion Laboratory will prepare for the next stages of their mission. Following Monday's historic event, the solar-powered rotorcraft will attempt up to four more flights during a period of fewer than 30 days. Over the next three Martian days -- also known as sols -- the helicopter's team will receive and analyze data and imagery from the first flight and devise a plan for the second experimental test, which is scheduled for no sooner than April 22. "If the helicopter survives the second flight test, the Ingenuity team will consider how best to expand the flight profile," NASA said in a Monday release. Ingenuity will conduct up to five flights, assuming NASA continues to successfully clear potential hurdles, each with chances to record additional data for future use. After Ingenuity is done, the Perseverance rover will resume its focus on surface operations.


NASA Mars helicopter makes history as first vehicle to fly on another planet

National Geographic

A small helicopter opened a new chapter of space exploration this morning when it lifted off the surface of Mars, marking humankind's first powered flight on another planet. The 19-inch-tall chopper called Ingenuity kicked up a little rusty red dust as it lifted about 10 feet off the ground, hovered in place, turned slightly, and slowly touched back down. The flight lasted only about 40 seconds, but it represents one of history's most audacious engineering feats. "A lot of people thought it was not possible to fly at Mars," says MiMi Aung, the project manager of Ingenuity at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). "There is so little air."


NASA Lands Ingenuity, the First Ever Mars Helicopter

WIRED

Very early this morning, NASA flew a small drone helicopter that its latest rover had toted to Mars, marking humankind's first controlled and powered flight on another planet. Ingenuity stuck the landing--and space engineers are stoked. Ingenuity ascended about one meter per second, until it rose three meters--about 10 feet above Mars. The helicopter hung as evenly as its state-of-the-art electronics could allow, and then landed where it had been 40 seconds before. Then, Ingenuity pinged its Earth-bound engineers a message they've sought for almost a decade: Mission accomplished.


The Morning After: Even NASA's Mars drone needs software updates

Engadget

Anyone who has ever brought a drone knows that after it comes out of the box, the first thing you do is install a ton of software updates. It turns out that things work similarly when you're NASA, and the drone is a helicopter preparing to take flight on Mars, 174 million miles away from you. Issues during a rotor test alerted the Ingenuity team to a problem with the command sequence, and to address it, they'll put together a patch and upload it to the craft over the next few days. That means more waiting before its eventual first test flight, but given the stakes, it makes sense to do everything necessary to avoid any type of crash. NVIDIA's GTC conference revealed the sexiest of all graphics announcements: data center CPUs.


NASA is about to fly a helicopter on another planet for the first time

New Scientist

NASA's Ingenuity Mars helicopter photographed by the Perseverance rover on 5 April The first drone on another world is ready to fly. The Ingenuity helicopter is primed to lift off from the surface of Mars on 12 April, which will be the first powered flight on another planet. NASA's Perseverance rover, which launched in July 2020 and arrived on Mars on 18 February, carried the Ingenuity helicopter folded up in its belly. After the rover landed, it dropped Ingenuity onto the ground and drove off so the drone could ready itself for its first flight. "It has survived launch, it has survived the journey through space, the vacuum and radiation, it has survived the entry and descent and landing onto the surface on the bottom of the Perseverance rover," said Bob Balaram at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Ingenuity's chief engineer, during a 23 March press conference.