Goto

Collaborating Authors

Results


Wireless charging on the moon

ZDNet

A company called WiBotic, which makes advanced wireless charging and fleet energy management solutions for technologies like drones and industrial robots, announced a major partnership to develop wireless charging solutions for robots on the moon. WiBotic will join in the $5.8 million contract with space robotics company Astrobotic, Bosch, and the University of Washington as part of NASA's'Tipping Point' program. "We're thrilled to have been selected by Astrobotic and NASA to deliver wireless charging capabilities to the next generation of lunar vehicles," says Ben Waters, CEO and co-founder, WiBotic. "While WiBotic specializes in wireless charging for military, industrial and commercial robots in all sorts of punishing environments here on Earth – from large warehouses to dusty deserts and corrosive saltwater – this is our first chance to take our technology into space. We're excited to work closely with NASA and be part of the next chapter of space exploration."


How NASA Finds the Mass of the Dirt Grabbed From an Asteroid

WIRED

When you think of space missions, you might think of humans walking on the moon or rovers rolling around on Mars. One of these events was the NASA OSIRIS-REx spacecraft touching an asteroid. It didn't just touch the asteroid named Bennu, it also picked up some material from the surface. It will then return that material to Earth so that humans can study it. How does OSIRIS-REx determine how much material it collected?


NASA taps AI to identify "fresh craters" on Mars

#artificialintelligence

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's HiRISE camera captured this impact crater on Mars. On July 15, 1965, the Mariner 4 spacecraft snapped a series of photographs of Mars during its flyby of the Red Planet. These were the first "close-up" images taken of another planet from outer space, according to NASA. One of these first grainy photographs depicted a massive crater nearly 100 miles in diameter. Now, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is tapping artificial intelligence (AI) to help with its cosmic cartography efforts, using these technologies to identify "fresh craters" on Mars.


#322: Exploring Venus with a Clockwork Rover, with Jonathan Sauder

Robohub

In this episode, Lilly interviews Jonathan Sauder, the Principal Investigator of a NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts project to design a rover for the surface of Venus. Sauder explains why exploring Venus is important and why previous surface missions have only lasted a few hours. They discuss his innovative wheeled-robot concept, a hybrid automaton rover which would be mostly mechanical and powered by wind. Jonathan Sauder is a NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Fellow and Senior Mechatronics Engineer at NASA Jet Propulsion Lab in the Technology Infusion Group focused on innovative concepts. He is also a lecturer of "Design Theory and Methodology" and "Advanced Mechanical Design" at the University of Southern California, where he received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering.


AI Weekly: In a chaotic year, AI is quietly accelerating the pace of space exploration

#artificialintelligence

The year 2020 continues to be difficult here on Earth, where the pandemic is exploding again in regions of the world that were once successful in containing it. Germany reported a record number of cases this week alongside Poland and the Czech Republic, as the U.S. counted 500,000 new cases. It's the backdrop to a tumultuous U.S. election, which experts fear will turn violent on election day. Meanwhile, Western and Southern states like Oregon, Washington, California, and Louisiana are reeling from historically destructive wildfires, severe droughts, and hurricanes. Things are calmer in outer space, where scientists are applying AI to make exciting new finds.


NASA's New AI Tool Can Spot Craters On Mars - Analytics India Magazine

#artificialintelligence

Amid NASA's progress in AI research starting from ML model to predict hurricanes to partnering with Google to make quantum computing accessible, it has now developed a new AI tool to classify a cluster of craters on Mars. The launch of this new AI tool, built on a machine learning algorithm, was aimed at helping scientists to reduce their process time of scanning a single Context Camera image. Thus, researchers from Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), created this tool also called an "automated fresh impact crater classifier", where for the "first time" researchers are leveraging AI to identify unknown craters on the Red Planet, stated by NASA, in their statement. According to their news release, typically scientists and researchers spend hours each day studying images to understand "dust devils, avalanches, and shifting dunes," and approximately 40 minutes to scan a single Context Camera image; however this tool will significantly reduce the processing time and advance the workflow massively. The launch of this tool is a part of a broader NASA's bigger effort -- COSMIC -- capturing onboard summarization to monitor image change that develops technologies for future generations of Mars orbiters.


Artificial intelligence helps classify new craters on Mars – IAM Network

#artificialintelligence

An innovative artificial intelligence (AI) tool developed by NASA has helped identify a cluster of craters on Mars that formed within the last decade.The new machine-learning algorithm, an automated fresh impact crater classifier, was created by researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in California -- and represents the first time artificial intelligence has been used to identify previously unknown craters on the Red Planet, according to a statement from NASA. Scientists have fed the algorithm more than 112,000 images taken by the Context Camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The program is designed to scan the photos for changes to Martian surface features that are indicative of new craters. In the case of the algorithm's first batch of finds, scientists think these craters formed from a meteor impact between March 2010 and May 2012. Related: Latest photos from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter"AI can't do the kind of skilled analysis a scientist can," Kiri Wagstaff, JPL computer scientist, said in the statement.


Artificial intelligence helps classify new craters on Mars

#artificialintelligence

An innovative artificial intelligence (AI) tool developed by NASA has helped identify a cluster of craters on Mars that formed within the last decade. The new machine-learning algorithm, an automated fresh impact crater classifier, was created by researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in California -- and represents the first time artificial intelligence has been used to identify previously unknown craters on the Red Planet, according to a statement from NASA. Scientists have fed the algorithm more than 112,000 images taken by the Context Camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The program is designed to scan the photos for changes to Martian surface features that are indicative of new craters. In the case of the algorithm's first batch of finds, scientists think these craters formed from a meteor impact between March 2010 and May 2012.


Asteroid samples escaping from jammed NASA spacecraft

FOX News

U.S. Space Force officials swear in first recruits for the defense branch on'Fox & amp; Friends.' CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A NASA spacecraft is stuffed with so much asteroid rubble from this week's grab that it's jammed open and precious particles are drifting away in space, scientists said Friday. Scientists announced the news three days after the spacecraft named Osiris-Rex briefly touched asteroid Bennu, NASA's first attempt at such a mission. The mission's lead scientist, Dante Lauretta of the University of Arizona, said Tuesday's operation 200 million miles away collected far more material than expected for return to Earth -- in the hundreds of grams. The sample container on the end of the robot arm penetrated so deeply into the asteroid and with such force, however, that rocks got sucked in and became wedged around the rim of the lid. In this image taken from video released by NASA, the Osiris-Rex spacecraft touches the surface of asteroid Bennu on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020.


Asteroid samples escaping from jammed NASA spacecraft

The Japan Times

Cape Canaveral, Florida – A NASA spacecraft is stuffed with so much asteroid rubble from this week's grab that it's jammed open and precious particles are drifting away in space, scientists said Friday. Scientists announced the news three days after the spacecraft named Osiris-Rex briefly touched asteroid Bennu, NASA's first attempt at such a mission. The mission's lead scientist, Dante Lauretta of the University of Arizona, said Tuesday's operation 200 million miles away collected far more material than expected for return to Earth – in the hundreds of grams. The sample container on the end of the robot arm penetrated so deeply into the asteroid and with such force, however, that rocks got sucked in and became wedged around the rim of the lid. Scientists estimate the sampler pressed as much as 19 inches (48 centimeters) into the rough, crumbly, black terrain.