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How artificial intelligence can help improve military readiness today

#artificialintelligence

In July 1950, a small group of American soldiers called Task Force Smith were all that stood in the way of an advance of North Korean armor. The soldiers' only anti-armor weapons were bazookas left over from World War II. The soldiers of Task Force Smith quickly found themselves firing round after round of bazooka ammunition into advancing North Korean T-34s only to see them explode harmlessly on the heavily armored tanks. Within seven hours, 40 percent of Task Force Smith were killed or wounded, and the North Korean advance rolled on.1 The shortcomings of the bazooka were no surprise. However, budget cutbacks after World War II scuttled adoption of an improved design.


Japan, U.S., South Korea agree: no easing of North Korea sanctions without progress in nuke talks

The Japan Times

SAN FRANCISCO – The top diplomats of Japan, the United States and South Korea on Tuesday urged North Korea to refrain from military provocation and continue denuclearization talks, but ruled out any easing of crushing economic sanctions without progress in the stalled negotiations. Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi held discussions with his U.S. and South Korean counterparts, Mike Pompeo and Kang Kyung-wha, in East Palo Alto, just outside San Francisco, two weeks after a deadline set by Pyongyang for progress by the end of 2019 passed. "We agreed on the importance of North Korea making positive efforts in talks with the United States rather than going through with provocative moves," Motegi told reporters. The statement appeared to contradict remarks in a New Year speech by South Korean President Moon Jae-in a day earlier in Seoul, where he said that he could seek exemptions of U.N. sanctions to bring about improved inter-Korean relations that he believes would help restart the deadlocked nuclear negotiations between Pyongyang and Washington. Moon has previously made similar comments, despite outside worries that any lifting of sanctions could undermine U.S.-led efforts to eliminate North Korea's nuclear arsenal.


Amazon scraps 'sexist AI' recruitment tool

The Independent - Tech

Amazon has scrapped a "sexist" tool that used artificial intelligence to decide the best candidates to hire for jobs. Members of the team working on the system said it effectively taught itself that male candidates were preferable. The artificial intelligence software was created by a team at Amazon's Edinburgh office in 2014 as a way to automatically sort through CVs and select the most talented applicants. But the algorithm rapidly taught itself to favour male candidates over female ones, according to members of the team who spoke to Reuters. Amazon wage increase could result in lower pay for some employees Black Friday 2018: The best Amazon deals Will Amazon's deliver-on-demand smart homes be the future of housing? Will Amazon's deliver-on-demand smart homes be the future of housing?


Financial Markets and Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Now, financial markets are not likely to care too much about the developing "Korean Situation." The impact of geopolitics on markets is still limited because investors do not price in extreme "tail risks" yet. Humans are genetically programmed to be optimistic about life and investors are still "most of the time" human, not, let's say robots. Investors that react as pure humans to so-called tail risks could become less and less the case because of the venue of Artificial Intelligence (AI) into our lives, notwithstanding we should expect that only to happen at a relatively "still" slow progressing pace. I personally have no doubt that "Change Is Coming" because of "AI" where professionals and those who have the means to use it will come first.


Robots help China fire missiles three times faster

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The Chinese armies are now able to use robots to fire ballistic missiles after successfully developing an automated launching system, Chinese military media claimed.


How Trump can destroy Kim Jong Un's nukes without blowing up the world

#artificialintelligence

In the long view of history, North Korea getting a nuclear-tipped intercontinental missile in 2017 is the rough equivalent of an army showing up for World War II riding horses and shooting muskets. Nukes are so last century. War is changing, driven by cyberweapons, artificial intelligence (AI) and robots. Weapons of mass destruction are dumb, soon to be whipped by smart weapons of pinpoint disruption--which nations can use without risking annihilation of the human race. If the U.S. is innovative and forward-thinking, it can develop technology that ensures no ill-behaving government could ever get a nuke off the ground.



AI is coming to war, regardless of Elon Musk's well-meaning concern

#artificialintelligence

Participants run ahead of Puerto de San Lorenzo's fighting bulls during the third bull run of the San Fermin festival in Pamplona, northern Spain. Each day at 8:00 am hundreds of people race with six bulls, charging along a winding, 848.6-metre (more than half a mile) course through narrow streets to the city's bull ring, where the animals are killed in a bullfight or corrida, during this festival, immortalised in Ernest Hemingway's 1926 novel "The Sun Also Rises" and dating back to medieval times and also featuring religious processions, folk dancing, concerts and round-the-clock drinking. Iraqi women, who fled the fighting between government forces and Islamic State (IS) group jihadists in the Old City of Mosul, cry as they stand in the city's western industrial district awaiting to be relocated


No one wants an arms race, but high-tech weapons are America's best shot at containing North Korea

Los Angeles Times

With threats, bribes, diplomacy and sanctions, American presidents of both parties have sought for 25 years to try to halt, or at least slow, North Korea's quest for a nuclear arsenal -- to no avail. Though the brinksmanship of the last few weeks has subsided, President Trump still faces the prospect of a madman -- Kim Jong Un -- in control of a nuclear arsenal. What the United States and its allies must now do is find options between conventional war, or even nuclear holocaust, on the one hand, and appeasement on the other. The answer could be robotic, cyber, and space weapons -- if we have the will to deploy them. They already have been used for pinpoint strikes on terrorist leaders and insurgent forces in the Mideast.


In message to North Korea, U.S. military shows off massive surveillance drone

The Japan Times

In what is likely a warning to nuclear-armed North Korea, the U.S. military on Wednesday showed off to media its Global Hawk surveillance drone, which is temporarily deployed to its Yokota Air Base in western Tokyo. The massive drone, with a wingspan of about 40 meters and a length of about 15 meters, can fly for long durations at altitudes higher than manned aircraft. The main focus of the deployment is believed to be to collect surveillance data on the North's nuclear- and missile-related facilities as well Chinese military activity in the Western Pacific. The aircraft is one of five Global Hawks sent to Yokota from their home base in Guam to avoid the harsh summer typhoon season that annually hits the Pacific island. The drones are scheduled to operate out of Yokota until the end of October.