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Tackling Climate Change with Machine Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Climate change is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity, and we, as machine learning experts, may wonder how we can help. Here we describe how machine learning can be a powerful tool in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping society adapt to a changing climate. From smart grids to disaster management, we identify high impact problems where existing gaps can be filled by machine learning, in collaboration with other fields. Our recommendations encompass exciting research questions as well as promising business opportunities. We call on the machine learning community to join the global effort against climate change.


Big data in agriculture focus of Houston conference Aug. 20-21

#artificialintelligence

HOUSTON – High-tech devices in agriculture such as unmanned aerial vehicles and sensors are leading to immense growth in data collection and deployment, and a Houston conference Aug. 20-21 will feature scholars and industry experts discussing future applications in all aspects of production agriculture. The invitation-only conference, Identifying Obstacles to Applying Big Data in Agriculture, will be held at the Houston Airport Marriott at George Bush Intercontinental Airport. It is sponsored by Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the U.S. Department of Agriculture- National Institute of Food and Agriculture. "We have had advanced technologies like GPS in agriculture for over 20 years, but only a small handful of these technologies have made a significant impact," said Dr. Alex Thomasson, conference coordinator and Texas A&M AgriLife Research engineer in College Station. "Thus we want to cast a vision for the practical use of big data in production agriculture so we can take advantage of the current wave of attendant technologies like the so-called Internet of Things, artificial intelligence, wireless communications, the cloud, etc. "This conference will feature discussion with key business leaders and academics involved in a broad range of disciplines within big data and precision agriculture.


Big data in agriculture focus of Houston conference Aug. 20-21 AgriLife Today

#artificialintelligence

HOUSTON – High-tech devices in agriculture such as unmanned aerial vehicles and sensors are leading to immense growth in data collection and deployment, and a Houston conference Aug. 20-21 will feature scholars and industry experts discussing future applications in all aspects of production agriculture. Identifying Obstacles to Applying Big Data in Agriculture will be held Aug. The invitation-only conference, Identifying Obstacles to Applying Big Data in Agriculture, will be held at the Houston Airport Marriott at George Bush Intercontinental Airport. It is sponsored by Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the U.S. Department of Agriculture- National Institute of Food and Agriculture. "We have had advanced technologies like GPS in agriculture for over 20 years, but only a small handful of these technologies have made a significant impact," said Dr. Alex Thomasson, conference coordinator and Texas A&M AgriLife Research engineer in College Station.


Robotic milkers produce big data for UConn's lauded dairy herd

#artificialintelligence

Robotic milkers are helping UConn's nationally acclaimed dairy herd run away from the pack. In May, UConn Storrs became the first campus in the nation to launch an automatic milking system that allows its pack of dairy cows to be milked when they're ready, rather than on a set, three-times-a-day schedule. In addition to freeing up UConn staff from the utterly monotonous work of milking, the on-demand, technology-driven system also allows the school's researchers to better track and manage the health of its herd. UConn is using two, $200,000 robots in addition to sensors that collect real-time data 24 hours a day to predict the healthfulness of about 88 cows and monitor their physical environment. The school added 3,000 square feet at its dairy center to house the new machines.



IBM Wants to Build Machine Learning 'Macroscopes' to Understand the World

#artificialintelligence

Like many tech companies, IBM is starting the new year by making a few predictions. One of them has to do with a software concept they call a "macroscope," a software technology that can be used to analyze the complexities of the physical world. IBM predicts that within five years, such technology will "help us understand the Earth's complexity in infinite detail." Hyperbole aside, the goal is to better manage world's resources and commercial endeavors that use those resources by applying machine learning algorithms across an array of data sources. That includes geospatial data (weather, soil, water, etc.) as well as data about economic, social and political conditions.


climate change big data ai

#artificialintelligence

Climate deniers aside, there are very few people who are not concerned about the effects of climate change. According to a poll released by Monmouth University in January, nearly 70% of respondents said "the world's climate is undergoing a change leading to more extreme weather patterns and sea level rise",[1] and a more recent poll from Gallup reported 64% of "Americans are worried a great deal and/or a fair deal about global warming" [2]. What many people are unaware of is the fact climate scientists and business leaders are increasingly turning to Big Data and Artificial Intelligence (AI) to combat climate change. In many ways, this is inevitable as the sheer amount of data required to measure the effects of climate change requires the use of next-generation analytics. For example, the large data sets used to analyze climate are often prone to generating false positives and our understanding of climate change is still in its nascent stages.