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Snowden Spills: Infamous Whistleblower Opines On Spycraft, AI, And Being Suicided

#artificialintelligence

Edward Snowden has finally laid it all out - documenting his memoires in a new 432-page book, Permanent Record, which will be published worldwide on Tuesday, September 17. Meeting with both The Guardian and Spiegel Online in Moscow as part of its promotion, the infamous whistleblower spent nearly five hours with the two media outlets - offering a taste of what's in the book, details on his background, and his thoughts on artificial intelligence, facial recognition, and other intelligence gathering tools coming to a dystopia near you. While The Guardian interview is'okay,' scroll down for the far more interesting Spiegel interview, where Snowden goes way deeper into his cloak-and-dagger life, including thoughts on getting suicided. Snowden describes in detail for the first time his background, and what led him to leak details of the secret programmes being run by the US National Security Agency (NSA) and the UK's secret communication headquarters, GCHQ. He describes the 18 years since the September 11 attacks as "a litany of American destruction by way of American self-destruction, with the promulgation of secret policies, secret laws, secret courts and secret wars".


Interview with Edward Snowden: 'If I Happen to Fall out of a Window, You Can Be Sure I Was Pushed'

Der Spiegel International

Book a suite in a luxury hotel in Moscow, send the room number encrypted to a pre-determined mobile number and then wait for a return message indicating a precise time: Meeting Edward Snwoden is pretty much exactly how children imagine the grand game of espionage is played. But then, on Monday, there he was, standing in our room on the first floor of the Hotel Metropol, as pale and boyish-looking as the was when the world first saw him in June 2013. For the last six years, he has been living in Russian exile. The U.S. has considered him to be an enemy of the state, right up there with Julian Assange, ever since he revealed, with the help of journalists, the full scope of the surveillance system operated by the National Security Agency (NSA). For quite some time, though, he remained silent about how he smuggled the secrets out of the country and what his personal motivations were. Now, though, he has written a book about it. It will be published worldwide on September 17 under the title "Permanent Record." Ahead of publication, Snowden spent over two-and-a-half hours patiently responding to questions from DER SPIEGEL. DER SPIEGEL: Mr. Snowden, you always said: "I am not the story."


'They wanted me gone': Edward Snowden tells of whistleblowing, his AI fears and six years in Russia

#artificialintelligence

Fri 13 Sep 2019 17.00 BST Last modified on Fri 13 Sep 2019 17.00 BST The world's most famous whistleblower, Edward Snowden, says he has detected a softening in public hostility towards him in the US over his disclosure of top-secret documents that revealed the extent of the global surveillance programmes run by American and British spy agencies. In an exclusive two-hour interview in Moscow to mark the publication of his memoirs, Permanent Record, Snowden said dire warnings that his disclosures would cause harm had not come to pass, and even former critics now conceded "we live in a better, freer and safer world" because of his revelations. In the book, Snowden describes in detail for the first time his background, and what led him to leak details of the secret programmes being run by the US National Security Agency (NSA) and the UK's secret communication headquarters, GCHQ. He describes the 18 years since the September 11 attacks as "a litany of American destruction by way of American self-destruction, with the promulgation of secret policies, secret laws, secret courts and secret wars". Snowden also said: "The greatest danger still lies ahead, with the refinement of artificial intelligence capabilities, such as facial and pattern recognition. "An AI-equipped surveillance camera would be not a mere recording device, but could be made into something closer to an automated police officer." He is concerned the US and other governments, aided by the big internet companies, are moving towards creating a permanent record of everyone on earth, recording the whole of their daily lives. While Snowden feels justified in what he did six years ago, he told the Guardian he was reconciled to being in Russia for years to come and was planning for his future on that basis. He reveals he secretly married his partner, Lindsay Mills, two years ago in a Russian courthouse. While he would rather be in the US or somewhere like Germany, he is relaxed in Russia, now able to lead a more or less normal daily life. He is less fearful than when he first arrived in 2013, when he felt lonely, isolated and paranoid that he could be targeted in the streets by US agents seeking retribution. "I was very much a person the most powerful government in the world wanted to go away.


Alice, the making of: Behind the scenes with the new AI assistant from Yandex

ZDNet

Today, another AI assistant is joining the party with Alexa, Google Assistant, Siri, Viv, and the gang. Her name is Alice, and she comes from Russia. Yandex, the Russian internet giant, has big plans for the future and Alice is a key part of those. Read also: Russia sentences hackers from Humpty Dumpty ring Facebook, Google, Twitter execs to testify at Russia hearings Did Russia's election hacking break international law? Recently, Yandex celebrated its 20 years in Moscow, and the celebration was an opportunity to visit Yandex HQ, converse with some of its top minds, and get the lowdown of what's cooking and how things work behind the scenes.