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#artificialintelligence

Autonomous truck company Ike recently received an order of 1000 trucks from DHL, Ryder and NFI. Logistics companies hope that the automation software and sensors that Ike has developed will save lives, improve operating margins and keep drivers close to home, said Ike. eDelivery reported that this solution is designed for long-haul highway driving, and will rely on human drivers to navigate the more complex routes. The Hyunday and Aptiv venture Motional released a dataset expansion of over 1.4 Billion annotated lidar points, reported VentureBeat. The dataset called NuScenes now includes NuImages, an aggregation of 100 000 2D images that represent challenging driving conditions designed to boost safety for AVs in complex situations. Instead of building fully autonomous planes from the ground-up, Californian startup Xwing has started to unveil its Autoflight System targeting an aircraft agnostic approach.


Autonomous driving startup Pony.ai raises $462 million in Toyota-led funding

The Japan Times

HONG KONG/BEIJING – Autonomous driving firm Pony.ai said it raised $462 million in its latest funding round, led by an investment by Toyota Motor Corp. Toyota invested around $400 million (¥44.2 billion) in the round, Pony.ai said in a statement Wednesday, marking its biggest investment in an autonomous driving company with a Chinese background. The latest fund raising values the three-year-old firm, already backed by Sequoia Capital China and Beijing Kunlun Tech Co., at slightly more than $3 billion. The investment by Japan's largest automaker comes at a time when global carmakers, technology firms, start-ups and investors -- including Tesla, Alphabet Inc.'s Waymo and Uber -- are pouring capital into developing self-driving vehicles. Over the past two years, 323 deals related to autonomous cars raised a total of $14.6 billion worldwide, according to data provider PitchBook, even amid concerns about the technology given its high cost and complexity. The Silicon Valley-based startup Pony.ai -- co-founded by CEO James Peng, a former executive at China's Baidu, and chief technology officer Lou Tiancheng, a former Google and Baidu engineer -- is already testing autonomous vehicles in California, Beijing and Guangzhou.


Autonomous driving startup Pony.ai raises $462 million in Toyota-led funding

The Japan Times

HONG KONG/BEIJING – Autonomous driving firm Pony.ai said on Wednesday it has raised $462 million in its latest funding round, led by an investment by Japan's largest automaker Toyota Motor Corp. Toyota invested around $400 million (¥44.2 billion) in the round, Pony.ai said in a statement, marking its biggest investment in an autonomous driving company with a Chinese background. The latest fund raising values the three-year-old firm, already backed by Sequoia Capital China and Beijing Kunlun Tech Co, at slightly more than $3 billion. The investment by Toyota comes at a time when global car makers, technology firms, start-ups and investors -- including Tesla, Alphabet Inc's Waymo and Uber -- are pouring capital into developing self-driving vehicles. Over the past two years, 323 deals related to autonomous cars raised a total of $14.6 billion worldwide, according to data provider PitchBook, even amid concerns about the technology given its high cost and complexity. The Silicon Valley-based startup Pony.ai -- co-founded by CEO James Peng, a former executive at China's Baidu, and chief technology officer Lou Tiancheng, a former Google and Baidu engineer -- is already testing autonomous vehicles in California, Beijing and Guangzhou.


Headspace: How the meditation app turns your stressful phone into a source of calm

The Independent - Tech

Meditation and mindfulness have been around for thousands of years. But the advent of smartphones and computers led to a new phenomenon: the mindfulness app. There are a few to choose from, including the punchy, assertive 10% Happier, the elegant and placid Calm and the first app that really brought mindfulness to our phones, Headspace. Andy Puddicombe, a former Buddhist monk who went on to run a meditation clinic in London, met a new business partner, Richard Pierson, and launched Headspace in 2010. The company began as an events organisation and led to the now-ubiquitous app in 2012.


Robotic Tesla taxis will be roaming the streets very soon, Elon Musk says

The Independent - Tech

Tesla plans to have a fleet of robotic taxis roaming the streets without drivers next year, Elon Musk has said. The claim is just the latest in a series of exciting pronouncements from the chief executive, who has repeatedly missed his own targets. But he has bet a considerable part of his business on the technology underpinning it. As well as allowing for the robot taxis that will drive themselves around the streets, Mr Musk says that by next year there will be a million Tesla cars on the streets that have full autonomous technology and are able to drive themselves. We'll tell you what's true.


Elon Musk says Neuralink machine that connects human brain to computers 'coming soon'

The Independent - Tech

Elon Musk has revealed his Neuralink startup is close to announcing the first brain-machine interface to connect humans and computers. The entrepreneur took to Twitter to tell followers the technology would be "coming soon" – though he failed to provide details. Neuralink was set up in 2016 with the ambitious goal of developing hardware to enhance the human brain, however, little about how this will work has been made public. We'll tell you what's true. You can form your own view.


From '12345' to 'blink182', the most hacked passwords revealed in warning over cyber-security

The Independent - Tech

Using easily guessed passwords across multiple accounts is a major gap in the online security habits of British people, a government study has found. The survey by the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) found that many internet users did not know the best ways to protect themselves from cybercrime, with 42 per cent expecting to lose money to online fraud. Only 15 per cent of the survey's 2,500 respondents said they knew "a great deal" about how to protect themselves from harmful activity online, while fewer than half of respondents said they do not always use a strong, separate password for their main email account. We'll tell you what's true. You can form your own view.


Apple shows off robot for tearing down iPhones as it reveals new recycling programs

The Independent - Tech

Daisy, one of Apple's most valued resources, eats iPhones. She's very, very good at it, and getting better: trained with a precision that would have been unimaginable just a few years ago. She is a robot, with a variety of tools built to rip the phones apart. That includes, for instance, a tool that can chill phones down so that the battery holding the glue inside becomes brittle, and it can be knocked out with two aggressive bangs; precise pins that can pick the display off the housing that surrounds it; drills that can punch into the phone and drive out the things that might make it difficult to recycle. It won't surprise anyone to hear that Apple is pretty good at making iPhones.


UK porn ban: What is it, when does it come into effect and can I get around it?

The Independent - Tech

The UK is about to introduce restrictions on watching pornography of a kind never before seen in the world. The government is planning to stop children being damaged by watching adult content by stopping anyone from doing so unless they go through a "rigorous" age verification process. Websites that aren't part of the blocks could find themselves being punished or blocked entirely within the UK. We'll tell you what's true. You can form your own view.


Apple settles dispute with Qualcomm, potentially allowing new features to come to the iPhone

The Independent - Tech

Apple has settled a major argument with chip maker Qualcomm that could help change the future of the iPhone. The two companies were locked in a bitter and worldwide international dispute about the technology that iPhones use to connect to the internet. The pair had been expected to try and resolve the dispute in legal hearings in San Diego, in a case that involved Apple's key iPhone suppliers. But just as that case began, the surprise truce was announced, with few details of the settlement being revealed. We'll tell you what's true.