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Challenges of Artificial Intelligence -- From Machine Learning and Computer Vision to Emotional Intelligence

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) has become a part of everyday conversation and our lives. It is considered as the new electricity that is revolutionizing the world. AI is heavily invested in both industry and academy. However, there is also a lot of hype in the current AI debate. AI based on so-called deep learning has achieved impressive results in many problems, but its limits are already visible. AI has been under research since the 1940s, and the industry has seen many ups and downs due to over-expectations and related disappointments that have followed. The purpose of this book is to give a realistic picture of AI, its history, its potential and limitations. We believe that AI is a helper, not a ruler of humans. We begin by describing what AI is and how it has evolved over the decades. After fundamentals, we explain the importance of massive data for the current mainstream of artificial intelligence. The most common representations for AI, methods, and machine learning are covered. In addition, the main application areas are introduced. Computer vision has been central to the development of AI. The book provides a general introduction to computer vision, and includes an exposure to the results and applications of our own research. Emotions are central to human intelligence, but little use has been made in AI. We present the basics of emotional intelligence and our own research on the topic. We discuss super-intelligence that transcends human understanding, explaining why such achievement seems impossible on the basis of present knowledge,and how AI could be improved. Finally, a summary is made of the current state of AI and what to do in the future. In the appendix, we look at the development of AI education, especially from the perspective of contents at our own university.


Artificial Intellgence -- Application in Life Sciences and Beyond. The Upper Rhine Artificial Intelligence Symposium UR-AI 2021

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The TriRhenaTech alliance presents the accepted papers of the 'Upper-Rhine Artificial Intelligence Symposium' held on October 27th 2021 in Kaiserslautern, Germany. Topics of the conference are applications of Artificial Intellgence in life sciences, intelligent systems, industry 4.0, mobility and others. The TriRhenaTech alliance is a network of universities in the Upper-Rhine Trinational Metropolitan Region comprising of the German universities of applied sciences in Furtwangen, Kaiserslautern, Karlsruhe, Offenburg and Trier, the Baden-Wuerttemberg Cooperative State University Loerrach, the French university network Alsace Tech (comprised of 14 'grandes \'ecoles' in the fields of engineering, architecture and management) and the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland. The alliance's common goal is to reinforce the transfer of knowledge, research, and technology, as well as the cross-border mobility of students.


Tesla's Self-Driving Business Is Powering Ahead Despite Setbacks

#artificialintelligence

Tesla stock (NASDAQ: TSLA) is up by almost 60% year-to-date, with its market cap crossing the rarefied $1 trillion mark recently. The run-up is partly due to Tesla's solid execution, with deliveries for this year poised to grow by almost 70% to about 850,000 vehicles, despite the ongoing semiconductor shortage. Tesla's sizable lead in the self-driving market has also traditionally been a very big driver of the company's valuation. So how far ahead is Tesla's self-driving system versus peers, and how does it stack up versus driver-driven vehicles. See our dashboard analysis on Just How Far Ahead Is Tesla In The Self-Driving Race? for more details.


Apple accelerates work on car as it aims for fully autonomous vehicle

The Japan Times

Apple Inc. is pushing to accelerate development of its electric car and is refocusing the project around full self-driving capabilities, according to people familiar with the matter, aiming to solve a technical challenge that has bedeviled the auto industry. For the past several years, Apple's car team had explored two simultaneous paths: creating a model with limited self-driving capabilities focused on steering and acceleration -- similar to most current cars from Tesla Inc. -- or a version with full self-driving ability that doesn't require human intervention. Under the effort's new leader -- Apple Watch software executive Kevin Lynch -- engineers are now concentrating on the second option. Lynch is pushing for a car with a full self-driving system in the first version, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the deliberations are private. It's just the latest shift for the car effort, known as the Special Projects Group or "Project Titan," which has endured strategy changes and executive turnover since starting around 2014.


Robo-taxis are headed for a street near you

MIT Technology Review

In the coming years, mobility solutions--or how we get from point A to point B--will bridge the gap between ground and air transportation--yes, that means flying cars. Technological advancements are transforming mobility for people and, leading to unprecedented change. Nand Kochhar, vice president of automotive and transportation for Siemens Software says this transformation extends beyond transportation to society in general. "The future of mobility is going to be multimodal to meet consumer demands, to offer a holistic experience in a frictionless way, which offers comfort, convenience, and safety to the end consumer." Thinking about transportation differently is part of a bigger trend, Kochhar notes: "Look at few other trends like sustainability and emissions, which are not just a challenge for the automotive industry but to society as a whole." The advances in technology will have benefits beyond shipping and commute improvements--these technological advancements, Kochhar argues, are poised to drive an infrastructure paradigm shift that will bring newfound autonomy to those who, today, aren't able to get around by themselves. Kochhar explains, "Just imagine people in our own families who are in that stage where they're not able to drive today. Now, you're able to provide them freedom." Laurel Ruma: From Technology Review, I'm Laurel Ruma, and this is Business Lab, the show that helps business leaders make sense of new technologies coming out of the lab and into the marketplace. Our topic today is the future of mobility. In 2011, Marc Andreessen famously said, "Software is eating the world."


The Station: Rimac-Bugatti is born, Tesla releases FSD beta v9 and Ola raises $500M – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

If you sent me a message on Twitter, email or pigeon post, please give me a few days to dig out of the pile that awaits me. You might recall that I mentioned I was off to do some backpacking and climbing in Grand Teton National Park and then eventually would make it to Yellowstone National Park. Yes, the crowds were real, especially for those who stuck to the traditional schedule of sightseeing between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. I took the early morning and late evening approach and never encountered the infamous parking lot traffic jams. It's that tactic that allowed me to take a ride in an empty T.E.D.D.Y., the autonomous vehicle that is being piloted in Yellowstone this summer.


How Volkswagen's $50 Billion Plan to Beat Tesla Short-Circuited

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

The car, however, didn't work as advertised. It could drive, turn corners and stop on a dime. But the fancy technology features VW had promised were either absent or broken. The company's programmers hadn't yet figured out how to update the car's software remotely. Its futuristic head-up display that was supposed to flash speed, directions and other data onto the windshield didn't function.


5 tech trends set to explode in your life this decade

#artificialintelligence

The average time-frame of tech disruption in our lives has significantly diminished and things are changing at a rapid scale. In a span of few years, gadgets such as MP3 players, compact digital cameras, scanners, CDs, fax machines and several others have more or less disappeared. On the other hand, new-age technologies like Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML), data analytics, Internet of Things (IoT), content streaming, automation, robotics and 5G have been growing in leaps and bounds to make our lives better. Let's take a look at five tech trends that are expected to explode in the decade that has just begun. Imagine a chip that can perform target computation in 200 seconds, which would otherwise take the world's fastest supercomputer 10,000 years.


Robotic Tesla taxis will be roaming the streets very soon, Elon Musk says

The Independent - Tech

Tesla plans to have a fleet of robotic taxis roaming the streets without drivers next year, Elon Musk has said. The claim is just the latest in a series of exciting pronouncements from the chief executive, who has repeatedly missed his own targets. But he has bet a considerable part of his business on the technology underpinning it. As well as allowing for the robot taxis that will drive themselves around the streets, Mr Musk says that by next year there will be a million Tesla cars on the streets that have full autonomous technology and are able to drive themselves. We'll tell you what's true.


Elon Musk says Neuralink machine that connects human brain to computers 'coming soon'

The Independent - Tech

Elon Musk has revealed his Neuralink startup is close to announcing the first brain-machine interface to connect humans and computers. The entrepreneur took to Twitter to tell followers the technology would be "coming soon" – though he failed to provide details. Neuralink was set up in 2016 with the ambitious goal of developing hardware to enhance the human brain, however, little about how this will work has been made public. We'll tell you what's true. You can form your own view.