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Robots to scale alternative to plastic packaging

#artificialintelligence

Greg Nichols covers robotics, AI, and AR/VR for ZDNet. A full-time journalist and author, he writes about tech, travel, crime, and the economy for global media outlets and reports from across the U. Robots are getting in on the effort to curb our addiction to single-use plastics. A new partnership between one of the largest industrial robotics manufacturers and a compostable packaging company points the way to an efficient and cost-effective green packaging revolution. ABB Robotics has signed an agreement to collaborate with California-based Zume, which makes the compostable packaging that's becoming more commonplace as an alternative to plastics. ABB's robotic cells will help Zume speed up and scale production of 100% compostable packaging made from plant-based agricultural material.


Addressing Labor Shortages with Automation

Communications of the ACM

U..S. employment statistics hit a new milestone last year, but not a positive one. In August 2021, almost 4.3 million workers quit their jobs, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. That's the highest number since the department began tracking voluntary resignations. Their reasons for leaving their jobs vary--the numbers track people who quit for a different position, as well as those who quit without having another job lined up. While the reasons for quitting vary, one thing is clear: Businesses are having a tough time getting employees to come back.


Waste management using artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

In addition, "alternative foods" led by food artificial intelligence technology companies are offered as a solution to global warming and animal welfare issues caused by factory farming and food shortages due to population growth. Alternative foods are proteins derived from proteins or alternative meat or dairy products from cell culture, or alternative proteins from edible insects. As burgers with vegetable protein substitutes have already gained recognition in terms of taste and quality in the United States, substitute meat is predicted to account for 60% of global meat consumption by 2040 and become popular. Now is the era of'environmentally friendly' rather than'eco-friendly'. Food safety anxiety from production to consumption is also reduced by a management system based on Artificial intelligence and big data, and food taste and texture are also formatted with a 3D food printer that takes into account not only personal health but also the health of the earth.


Scientists develop edible TAPE that can hold burritos together and prevent leakages

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Unraveled, chaotic meals could be a thing of the past for burrito lovers thanks to a group of engineering students from Johns Hopkins University and their lunch-saving invention. Dubbed'Tastee Tape', the invention is simply edible sticky tape designed to hold a burrito together while it's being eaten. 'Tastee Tape allows you to put full faith in your tortilla and enjoy your meal, mess-free,' said Tyler Guarino, who led the project. Unraveled, chaotic meals could be a thing of the past for burrito lovers thanks to a group of engineering students from Johns Hopkins University and their lunch-saving invention. Dubbed'Tastee Tape', the invention is simply edible sticky tape designed to hold a burrito together while it's being eaten The team tested a'multitude' of ingredients and combinations before settling on a final recipe.


Uber Eats delivery goes fully autonomous

ZDNet

Greg Nichols covers robotics, AI, and AR/VR for ZDNet. A full-time journalist and author, he writes about tech, travel, crime, and the economy for global media outlets and reports from across the U. Uber Eats is turning to autonomous vehicles in a major market. Along with AV partner Motional, the third-party delivery platform will be launching a new autonomous delivery experience in Santa Monica, California. Deliveries will be conducted in Motional's IONIQ 5 vehicles, which are capable of operating autonomously. Participating restaurants bring packaged orders to the curb and place them inside a locking compartment.


Uber Eats is launching two autonomous delivery pilots today in Los Angeles

Engadget

Uber Eats is launching not just one but two autonomous delivery pilots today in Los Angeles, TechCrunch has reported. The first is via an autonomous vehicle partnership with Motional, originally announced in December, and the second is with sidewalk delivery firm Serve Robotics, a company that spun out of Uber itself. The trials will be limited, with deliveries from just a few merchants including the Kreation juicery and organic cafe. Serve will do short delivery routes in West Hollywood, while Motional will take care of longer deliveries in Santa Monica. "We'll be able to learn from both of those pilots what customers actually want, what merchants actually want and what makes sense for delivery," an Uber spokesperson told TechCrunch.


Chatbots and a tortilla-making robot: Chipotle's AI

#artificialintelligence

"With AI, we can really target and segment who gets what message and based on previous purchases and viewing habits. We can see how we can customize our messaging," Park said. An example of this AI-driven marketing approach is the way the chain -- which has some 2,000 locations in the U.S., Canada and Europe -- targets the 27 million loyalty rewards members who have downloaded its mobile app. Chipotle uses recommendation algorithms to send notifications to users of the app about deals tailored to the different foods they've ordered before, therefore improving their customer experience, according to the company. Chipotle also uses AI to improve customer service.


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How a grocery startup in Georgia is using AI and edge computing for "frictionless" shopping

ZDNet

Stephanie Condon is a senior staff writer for Red Ventures based in Portland, Oregon, covering business technology for ZDNet. Retail -- and grocery in particular -- is a tough business. Grocers operate on razor-thin margins, and they're up against commercial giants like Amazon and Walmart. Increasingly, major grocery chains are turning to AI, edge computing and other innovative technologies to help them bring down costs. But along with Giant Eagle, Whole Foods and other big names in the industry, one small startup in the Atlanta area is betting that a tech-first approach to grocery shopping will help them expand their business across the US.


Out of the box: Japan's vending machines get a modern makeover amid pandemic

The Japan Times

Late-night conference calls were the norm for Andy Lin when he was an engineer in California for a global semiconductor company. The time difference with clients in Taiwan, where the firm is headquartered, meant he'd often find himself feeling famished after most diners closed. One night he finished work at around 3 a.m. and decided to see if there were any vending machines that sold what he was craving -- satiating soup and noodles. Instead, he discovered on YouTube that there were vending machines serving hot bowls of udon (wheat noodles) in Japan 30 to 40 years ago. "I did some further research and found it was still popular because it's a (retro) machine that's still working and everyone wanted to try it," he says.